The Human Skin Barrier Is Organized as Stacked Bilayers of Fully Extended Ceramides with Cholesterol Molecules Associated with the Ceramide Sphingoid Moiety

Ichiro Iwai, Hongmei Han, Lianne den Hollander, Stina Svensson, Lars-Göran Ofverstedt, Jamshed Anwar, Jonathan Brewer, Maria Bloksgaard Mølgaard, Aurelie Laloeuf, Daniel Nosek, Sergej Masich, Luis A Bagatolli, Ulf Skoglund, Lars Norlén

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

The skin barrier is fundamental to terrestrial life and its evolution; it upholds homeostasis and protects against the environment. Skin barrier capacity is controlled by lipids that fill the extracellular space of the skin's surface layer-the stratum corneum. Here we report on the determination of the molecular organization of the skin's lipid matrix in situ, in its near-native state, using a methodological approach combining very high magnification cryo-electron microscopy (EM) of vitreous skin section defocus series, molecular modeling, and EM simulation. The lipids are organized in an arrangement not previously described in a biological system-stacked bilayers of fully extended ceramides (CERs) with cholesterol molecules associated with the CER sphingoid moiety. This arrangement rationalizes the skin's low permeability toward water and toward hydrophilic and lipophilic substances, as well as the skin barrier's robustness toward hydration and dehydration, environmental temperature and pressure changes, stretching, compression, bending, and shearing.Journal of Investigative Dermatology advance online publication, 26 April 2012; doi:10.1038/jid.2012.43.
OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftJournal of Investigative Dermatology
Vol/bind132
Udgave nummer9
Sider (fra-til)2215-2225
Antal sider10
ISSN0022-202X
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 2012

Fingeraftryk

Ceramides
Skin
Cholesterol
Molecules
Lipids
Electron microscopy
Dermatology
Cryoelectron Microscopy
Bending (forming)
Molecular modeling
Biological systems
Dehydration
Shearing
Hydration
Stretching
Publications
Electron Microscopy
Compaction
Homeostasis
Water

Citer dette

Iwai, Ichiro ; Han, Hongmei ; Hollander, Lianne den ; Svensson, Stina ; Ofverstedt, Lars-Göran ; Anwar, Jamshed ; Brewer, Jonathan ; Mølgaard, Maria Bloksgaard ; Laloeuf, Aurelie ; Nosek, Daniel ; Masich, Sergej ; Bagatolli, Luis A ; Skoglund, Ulf ; Norlén, Lars. / The Human Skin Barrier Is Organized as Stacked Bilayers of Fully Extended Ceramides with Cholesterol Molecules Associated with the Ceramide Sphingoid Moiety. I: Journal of Investigative Dermatology. 2012 ; Bind 132, Nr. 9. s. 2215-2225.
@article{1bb090c51dc14ede9b612b21bcbe2db3,
title = "The Human Skin Barrier Is Organized as Stacked Bilayers of Fully Extended Ceramides with Cholesterol Molecules Associated with the Ceramide Sphingoid Moiety",
abstract = "The skin barrier is fundamental to terrestrial life and its evolution; it upholds homeostasis and protects against the environment. Skin barrier capacity is controlled by lipids that fill the extracellular space of the skin's surface layer-the stratum corneum. Here we report on the determination of the molecular organization of the skin's lipid matrix in situ, in its near-native state, using a methodological approach combining very high magnification cryo-electron microscopy (EM) of vitreous skin section defocus series, molecular modeling, and EM simulation. The lipids are organized in an arrangement not previously described in a biological system-stacked bilayers of fully extended ceramides (CERs) with cholesterol molecules associated with the CER sphingoid moiety. This arrangement rationalizes the skin's low permeability toward water and toward hydrophilic and lipophilic substances, as well as the skin barrier's robustness toward hydration and dehydration, environmental temperature and pressure changes, stretching, compression, bending, and shearing.Journal of Investigative Dermatology advance online publication, 26 April 2012; doi:10.1038/jid.2012.43.",
author = "Ichiro Iwai and Hongmei Han and Hollander, {Lianne den} and Stina Svensson and Lars-G{\"o}ran Ofverstedt and Jamshed Anwar and Jonathan Brewer and M{\o}lgaard, {Maria Bloksgaard} and Aurelie Laloeuf and Daniel Nosek and Sergej Masich and Bagatolli, {Luis A} and Ulf Skoglund and Lars Norl{\'e}n",
year = "2012",
doi = "10.1038/jid.2012.43",
language = "English",
volume = "132",
pages = "2215--2225",
journal = "The Journal of Investigative Dermatology",
issn = "0022-202X",
publisher = "Nature Publishing Group",
number = "9",

}

Iwai, I, Han, H, Hollander, LD, Svensson, S, Ofverstedt, L-G, Anwar, J, Brewer, J, Mølgaard, MB, Laloeuf, A, Nosek, D, Masich, S, Bagatolli, LA, Skoglund, U & Norlén, L 2012, 'The Human Skin Barrier Is Organized as Stacked Bilayers of Fully Extended Ceramides with Cholesterol Molecules Associated with the Ceramide Sphingoid Moiety', Journal of Investigative Dermatology, bind 132, nr. 9, s. 2215-2225. https://doi.org/10.1038/jid.2012.43

The Human Skin Barrier Is Organized as Stacked Bilayers of Fully Extended Ceramides with Cholesterol Molecules Associated with the Ceramide Sphingoid Moiety. / Iwai, Ichiro; Han, Hongmei; Hollander, Lianne den; Svensson, Stina; Ofverstedt, Lars-Göran; Anwar, Jamshed; Brewer, Jonathan; Mølgaard, Maria Bloksgaard; Laloeuf, Aurelie; Nosek, Daniel; Masich, Sergej; Bagatolli, Luis A; Skoglund, Ulf; Norlén, Lars.

I: Journal of Investigative Dermatology, Bind 132, Nr. 9, 2012, s. 2215-2225.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - The Human Skin Barrier Is Organized as Stacked Bilayers of Fully Extended Ceramides with Cholesterol Molecules Associated with the Ceramide Sphingoid Moiety

AU - Iwai, Ichiro

AU - Han, Hongmei

AU - Hollander, Lianne den

AU - Svensson, Stina

AU - Ofverstedt, Lars-Göran

AU - Anwar, Jamshed

AU - Brewer, Jonathan

AU - Mølgaard, Maria Bloksgaard

AU - Laloeuf, Aurelie

AU - Nosek, Daniel

AU - Masich, Sergej

AU - Bagatolli, Luis A

AU - Skoglund, Ulf

AU - Norlén, Lars

PY - 2012

Y1 - 2012

N2 - The skin barrier is fundamental to terrestrial life and its evolution; it upholds homeostasis and protects against the environment. Skin barrier capacity is controlled by lipids that fill the extracellular space of the skin's surface layer-the stratum corneum. Here we report on the determination of the molecular organization of the skin's lipid matrix in situ, in its near-native state, using a methodological approach combining very high magnification cryo-electron microscopy (EM) of vitreous skin section defocus series, molecular modeling, and EM simulation. The lipids are organized in an arrangement not previously described in a biological system-stacked bilayers of fully extended ceramides (CERs) with cholesterol molecules associated with the CER sphingoid moiety. This arrangement rationalizes the skin's low permeability toward water and toward hydrophilic and lipophilic substances, as well as the skin barrier's robustness toward hydration and dehydration, environmental temperature and pressure changes, stretching, compression, bending, and shearing.Journal of Investigative Dermatology advance online publication, 26 April 2012; doi:10.1038/jid.2012.43.

AB - The skin barrier is fundamental to terrestrial life and its evolution; it upholds homeostasis and protects against the environment. Skin barrier capacity is controlled by lipids that fill the extracellular space of the skin's surface layer-the stratum corneum. Here we report on the determination of the molecular organization of the skin's lipid matrix in situ, in its near-native state, using a methodological approach combining very high magnification cryo-electron microscopy (EM) of vitreous skin section defocus series, molecular modeling, and EM simulation. The lipids are organized in an arrangement not previously described in a biological system-stacked bilayers of fully extended ceramides (CERs) with cholesterol molecules associated with the CER sphingoid moiety. This arrangement rationalizes the skin's low permeability toward water and toward hydrophilic and lipophilic substances, as well as the skin barrier's robustness toward hydration and dehydration, environmental temperature and pressure changes, stretching, compression, bending, and shearing.Journal of Investigative Dermatology advance online publication, 26 April 2012; doi:10.1038/jid.2012.43.

U2 - 10.1038/jid.2012.43

DO - 10.1038/jid.2012.43

M3 - Journal article

VL - 132

SP - 2215

EP - 2225

JO - The Journal of Investigative Dermatology

JF - The Journal of Investigative Dermatology

SN - 0022-202X

IS - 9

ER -