"The helm is lost!" Reframing psychological matters in non-routine technologically mediated interaction in a maritime context

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

The maritime industry is a dangerous and highly technologically saturated sector. Unfortunately, advancement in automation and technology have not minimised human error as intended. Interaction between humans and technology in the industry is also overtly pre-scripted. The main reason for this is to reduce human error by ensuring predictability in interaction. Ultimately, investigations of non-routine interaction are often based on a hindsight view of what went wrong in a given situation. This article analyses a collection of non-routine interactions that derive from a larger data corpus, using Discursive Psychology and Conversation Analysis. It argues that such a study can capture what is missing from some investigations, namely, what makes sense for crews in the context of a given non-routine situation. Despite the constraints and the challenges of technological complexity, this article argues that reframing psychological matters in non-routine technologically mediated interaction can be a new way of showing how such matters are dynamic, visible and manageable. This can inform the general debate of how to minimise human error, and more specifically, provide insight into the increasing inclusion of technology and as a consequence, the equally increasing amount of technologically mediated interaction that we will see in the future.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
Artikelnummer2
TidsskriftText & Talk (Print Edition)
Vol/bind39
Udgave nummer2
Sider (fra-til)171-190
Antal sider19
ISSN1860-7330
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 13. mar. 2019

Fingeraftryk

human error
interaction
Industry
Automation
industry
conversation analysis
automation
Reframing
Psychological
Interaction
psychology
inclusion

Citer dette

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"The helm is lost!" Reframing psychological matters in non-routine technologically mediated interaction in a maritime context. / Froholdt, Lisa Loloma.

I: Text & Talk (Print Edition), Bind 39, Nr. 2, 2, 13.03.2019, s. 171-190.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

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