The effects of introducing a clinical pharmacist on orthopaedic wards in Denmark

Thomas Croft Buck, Lene Brandstrup, Ivan Brandslund, Jens Peter Kampmann

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

 
Udgivelsesdato: 2007-Feb
OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftPharmacy World & Science
Vol/bind29
Udgave nummer1
Sider (fra-til)12-18
Antal sider6
ISSN0928-1231
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 1. feb. 2007

Fingeraftryk

Orthopedics
Denmark
Pharmacists
Prescriptions
Hospital Pharmacy Services
Costs
Cost reduction
Medicine
Physicians
Prospective Studies

Citer dette

Buck, Thomas Croft ; Brandstrup, Lene ; Brandslund, Ivan ; Kampmann, Jens Peter. / The effects of introducing a clinical pharmacist on orthopaedic wards in Denmark. I: Pharmacy World & Science. 2007 ; Bind 29, Nr. 1. s. 12-18.
@article{8eed3c20d61d11dc860c000ea68e967b,
title = "The effects of introducing a clinical pharmacist on orthopaedic wards in Denmark",
abstract = "OBJECTIVE: To assess the effects and cost effects of introducing clinical pharmacists on hospital wards. METHODS: Comparative prospective study on four orthopaedic surgical wards in two hospitals. The primary effect variables were 10 target areas widely considered to be indicators of good prescription practice. Prescriptions not following good practice in these intervention areas were defined as {"}sub-optimal prescriptions,{"} and then discussed between a physician and a clinical pharmacist. The primary parameter was the difference in the number of days with a sub-optimal prescription (Mann-Whitney test). RESULTS: On an average 20{\%} of all the patients had a sub-optimal prescription. Of these, 70{\%} were changed by the physician after intervention by the clinical pharmacist. There was a statistically significant difference in the duration of days in treatment with a sub-optimal prescription. Where sub-optimal prescriptions were changed, 43{\%} resulted in cost reductions. The reductions achieved could cover 47{\%} of the costs of clinical pharmacy service. CONCLUSION: Clinical pharmacy services offered to four orthopaedic surgical wards resulted in reduction of sub-optimal prescriptions. Every time the pharmacist screened seven patients one sub-optimal prescription was found and adjusted. The reduction in medicine costs due to adjusted sub-optimal prescriptions could not cover the whole cost of clinical pharmacy service.",
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author = "Buck, {Thomas Croft} and Lene Brandstrup and Ivan Brandslund and Kampmann, {Jens Peter}",
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The effects of introducing a clinical pharmacist on orthopaedic wards in Denmark. / Buck, Thomas Croft; Brandstrup, Lene; Brandslund, Ivan; Kampmann, Jens Peter.

I: Pharmacy World & Science, Bind 29, Nr. 1, 01.02.2007, s. 12-18.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - The effects of introducing a clinical pharmacist on orthopaedic wards in Denmark

AU - Buck, Thomas Croft

AU - Brandstrup, Lene

AU - Brandslund, Ivan

AU - Kampmann, Jens Peter

PY - 2007/2/1

Y1 - 2007/2/1

N2 - OBJECTIVE: To assess the effects and cost effects of introducing clinical pharmacists on hospital wards. METHODS: Comparative prospective study on four orthopaedic surgical wards in two hospitals. The primary effect variables were 10 target areas widely considered to be indicators of good prescription practice. Prescriptions not following good practice in these intervention areas were defined as "sub-optimal prescriptions," and then discussed between a physician and a clinical pharmacist. The primary parameter was the difference in the number of days with a sub-optimal prescription (Mann-Whitney test). RESULTS: On an average 20% of all the patients had a sub-optimal prescription. Of these, 70% were changed by the physician after intervention by the clinical pharmacist. There was a statistically significant difference in the duration of days in treatment with a sub-optimal prescription. Where sub-optimal prescriptions were changed, 43% resulted in cost reductions. The reductions achieved could cover 47% of the costs of clinical pharmacy service. CONCLUSION: Clinical pharmacy services offered to four orthopaedic surgical wards resulted in reduction of sub-optimal prescriptions. Every time the pharmacist screened seven patients one sub-optimal prescription was found and adjusted. The reduction in medicine costs due to adjusted sub-optimal prescriptions could not cover the whole cost of clinical pharmacy service.

AB - OBJECTIVE: To assess the effects and cost effects of introducing clinical pharmacists on hospital wards. METHODS: Comparative prospective study on four orthopaedic surgical wards in two hospitals. The primary effect variables were 10 target areas widely considered to be indicators of good prescription practice. Prescriptions not following good practice in these intervention areas were defined as "sub-optimal prescriptions," and then discussed between a physician and a clinical pharmacist. The primary parameter was the difference in the number of days with a sub-optimal prescription (Mann-Whitney test). RESULTS: On an average 20% of all the patients had a sub-optimal prescription. Of these, 70% were changed by the physician after intervention by the clinical pharmacist. There was a statistically significant difference in the duration of days in treatment with a sub-optimal prescription. Where sub-optimal prescriptions were changed, 43% resulted in cost reductions. The reductions achieved could cover 47% of the costs of clinical pharmacy service. CONCLUSION: Clinical pharmacy services offered to four orthopaedic surgical wards resulted in reduction of sub-optimal prescriptions. Every time the pharmacist screened seven patients one sub-optimal prescription was found and adjusted. The reduction in medicine costs due to adjusted sub-optimal prescriptions could not cover the whole cost of clinical pharmacy service.

KW - Aged

KW - Aged, 80 and over

KW - Costs and Cost Analysis

KW - Denmark

KW - Drug Therapy

KW - Female

KW - Hospital Units

KW - Humans

KW - Male

KW - Middle Aged

KW - Orthopedics

KW - Pharmacists

KW - Pharmacy Service, Hospital

KW - Physician's Practice Patterns

KW - Professional Role

KW - Prospective Studies

KW - Quality Assurance, Health Care

U2 - 10.1007/s11096-005-2906-3

DO - 10.1007/s11096-005-2906-3

M3 - Journal article

VL - 29

SP - 12

EP - 18

JO - Pharmacy World & Science

JF - Pharmacy World & Science

SN - 0928-1231

IS - 1

ER -