The effect of intelligent physical exercise training on sickness absence and job performance among office workers: a randomized controlled trial

Publikation: Konferencebidrag uden forlag/tidsskriftKonferenceabstrakt til konferenceForskningpeer review

Resumé

The effect of intelligent physical exercise training on sickness absence and job performance among office workers: a randomized controlled trial Christensen, JR. 1, Sjøgaard, G. 1, Søgaard, K. 1, Justesen, JB. 1 SDU (Odense, Denmark) Introduction Physical training may improve health and decrease the risk of sickness absence and low job performance. The aim of this paper was thus to investigate the effect of individually tailored intelligent physical exercise training (IPET) on sickness absence and job performance among office workers. Methods In a randomized controlled trial employees from six companies located across Denmark were allocated to a training group, TG, (N = 194) or a control group, CG, (N = 195). The TG received one-hour high intensity IPET every week within working hours, and was recommended to perform 30 minutes of moderate intensity physical activity six days a week during leisure time. The principles of IPET have previously been described in details (Sjogaard, Justesen et al. 2014). Before and after the one-year intervention the office workers answered a questionnaire on work ability (ten-step ordinal scale), productivity (ten-step ordinal scale), and health (five–step ordinal scale). These data were analyzed with ITT. Only short term absence in spells of 1 to 10 days were included in the sickness absence data. Adherence was calculated as the number of completed training sessions out of the total possible training sessions, which ranged from 34 - 37 between the six companies within the one-year time-period. For the per protocol analysis, we set a cut-point of ≥70 % for adherence. Results At baseline, there were no differences between training and control group. The participants were on average 44 ± 10.4 years old, 75% were female and had an average BMI of 25.4 ± 5.1 kg/m2 and an average percentage body fat of 29.1 ± 8.8%. After one year, an ITT analysis showed that TG had a significant increase in workability from 8,7 to 9,0 (p = <0.001), productivity from 8,2 to 8,6 (p = 0.054) and general health from 3,5 to 3,8 (p = <0.001) compared to the CG but there was no change in sickness absence between the two groups. A per protocol analysis, where 89 (46%) office workers participated ≥70 % showed a significant 6% improvement in job performance (p = <0.001), and 56 % decrease in sickness absence (p = <0.001) compared to the CG from baseline to one-year follow-up. Sickness absence were at baseline mean 4,4 days in TG and 3,5 days in CG. Discussion One-hour high intensity IPET in working hours combined with recommendations of 30 minutes daily leisure time moderate intensity physical activity improved job performance and decreased sickness absence if adhering to the intervention protocol. Overall, these results underline the effectiveness and corporate incentives of implementing IPET at the workplace. Reference Sjøgaard G., Justesen JB, Murray M, Dalager T, Søgaard K. (2014). BMC Public Health, (14), 652. Contact jrchristensen@health.sdu.dk
OriginalsprogEngelsk
Publikationsdato24. jun. 2015
StatusUdgivet - 24. jun. 2015
Begivenhed20th Annual Congress of the European College of Sport Science: Sustainable Sport - Clarion Hotel & Congress Malmö Live, Malmø, Sverige
Varighed: 24. jun. 201527. jun. 2015

Konference

Konference20th Annual Congress of the European College of Sport Science
LokationClarion Hotel & Congress Malmö Live
LandSverige
ByMalmø
Periode24/06/201527/06/2015

Citer dette

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abstract = "The effect of intelligent physical exercise training on sickness absence and job performance among office workers: a randomized controlled trial Christensen, JR. 1, Sj{\o}gaard, G. 1, S{\o}gaard, K. 1, Justesen, JB. 1 SDU (Odense, Denmark) Introduction Physical training may improve health and decrease the risk of sickness absence and low job performance. The aim of this paper was thus to investigate the effect of individually tailored intelligent physical exercise training (IPET) on sickness absence and job performance among office workers. Methods In a randomized controlled trial employees from six companies located across Denmark were allocated to a training group, TG, (N = 194) or a control group, CG, (N = 195). The TG received one-hour high intensity IPET every week within working hours, and was recommended to perform 30 minutes of moderate intensity physical activity six days a week during leisure time. The principles of IPET have previously been described in details (Sjogaard, Justesen et al. 2014). Before and after the one-year intervention the office workers answered a questionnaire on work ability (ten-step ordinal scale), productivity (ten-step ordinal scale), and health (five–step ordinal scale). These data were analyzed with ITT. Only short term absence in spells of 1 to 10 days were included in the sickness absence data. Adherence was calculated as the number of completed training sessions out of the total possible training sessions, which ranged from 34 - 37 between the six companies within the one-year time-period. For the per protocol analysis, we set a cut-point of ≥70 {\%} for adherence. Results At baseline, there were no differences between training and control group. The participants were on average 44 ± 10.4 years old, 75{\%} were female and had an average BMI of 25.4 ± 5.1 kg/m2 and an average percentage body fat of 29.1 ± 8.8{\%}. After one year, an ITT analysis showed that TG had a significant increase in workability from 8,7 to 9,0 (p = <0.001), productivity from 8,2 to 8,6 (p = 0.054) and general health from 3,5 to 3,8 (p = <0.001) compared to the CG but there was no change in sickness absence between the two groups. A per protocol analysis, where 89 (46{\%}) office workers participated ≥70 {\%} showed a significant 6{\%} improvement in job performance (p = <0.001), and 56 {\%} decrease in sickness absence (p = <0.001) compared to the CG from baseline to one-year follow-up. Sickness absence were at baseline mean 4,4 days in TG and 3,5 days in CG. Discussion One-hour high intensity IPET in working hours combined with recommendations of 30 minutes daily leisure time moderate intensity physical activity improved job performance and decreased sickness absence if adhering to the intervention protocol. Overall, these results underline the effectiveness and corporate incentives of implementing IPET at the workplace. Reference Sj{\o}gaard G., Justesen JB, Murray M, Dalager T, S{\o}gaard K. (2014). BMC Public Health, (14), 652. Contact jrchristensen@health.sdu.dk",
author = "Christensen, {Jeanette Reffstrup} and Gisela Sj{\o}gaard and Karen S{\o}gaard and Justesen, {Just Bendix}",
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The effect of intelligent physical exercise training on sickness absence and job performance among office workers : a randomized controlled trial. / Christensen, Jeanette Reffstrup; Sjøgaard, Gisela; Søgaard, Karen; Justesen, Just Bendix.

2015. Abstract fra 20th Annual Congress of the European College of Sport Science, Malmø, Sverige.

Publikation: Konferencebidrag uden forlag/tidsskriftKonferenceabstrakt til konferenceForskningpeer review

TY - ABST

T1 - The effect of intelligent physical exercise training on sickness absence and job performance among office workers

T2 - a randomized controlled trial

AU - Christensen, Jeanette Reffstrup

AU - Sjøgaard, Gisela

AU - Søgaard, Karen

AU - Justesen, Just Bendix

PY - 2015/6/24

Y1 - 2015/6/24

N2 - The effect of intelligent physical exercise training on sickness absence and job performance among office workers: a randomized controlled trial Christensen, JR. 1, Sjøgaard, G. 1, Søgaard, K. 1, Justesen, JB. 1 SDU (Odense, Denmark) Introduction Physical training may improve health and decrease the risk of sickness absence and low job performance. The aim of this paper was thus to investigate the effect of individually tailored intelligent physical exercise training (IPET) on sickness absence and job performance among office workers. Methods In a randomized controlled trial employees from six companies located across Denmark were allocated to a training group, TG, (N = 194) or a control group, CG, (N = 195). The TG received one-hour high intensity IPET every week within working hours, and was recommended to perform 30 minutes of moderate intensity physical activity six days a week during leisure time. The principles of IPET have previously been described in details (Sjogaard, Justesen et al. 2014). Before and after the one-year intervention the office workers answered a questionnaire on work ability (ten-step ordinal scale), productivity (ten-step ordinal scale), and health (five–step ordinal scale). These data were analyzed with ITT. Only short term absence in spells of 1 to 10 days were included in the sickness absence data. Adherence was calculated as the number of completed training sessions out of the total possible training sessions, which ranged from 34 - 37 between the six companies within the one-year time-period. For the per protocol analysis, we set a cut-point of ≥70 % for adherence. Results At baseline, there were no differences between training and control group. The participants were on average 44 ± 10.4 years old, 75% were female and had an average BMI of 25.4 ± 5.1 kg/m2 and an average percentage body fat of 29.1 ± 8.8%. After one year, an ITT analysis showed that TG had a significant increase in workability from 8,7 to 9,0 (p = <0.001), productivity from 8,2 to 8,6 (p = 0.054) and general health from 3,5 to 3,8 (p = <0.001) compared to the CG but there was no change in sickness absence between the two groups. A per protocol analysis, where 89 (46%) office workers participated ≥70 % showed a significant 6% improvement in job performance (p = <0.001), and 56 % decrease in sickness absence (p = <0.001) compared to the CG from baseline to one-year follow-up. Sickness absence were at baseline mean 4,4 days in TG and 3,5 days in CG. Discussion One-hour high intensity IPET in working hours combined with recommendations of 30 minutes daily leisure time moderate intensity physical activity improved job performance and decreased sickness absence if adhering to the intervention protocol. Overall, these results underline the effectiveness and corporate incentives of implementing IPET at the workplace. Reference Sjøgaard G., Justesen JB, Murray M, Dalager T, Søgaard K. (2014). BMC Public Health, (14), 652. Contact jrchristensen@health.sdu.dk

AB - The effect of intelligent physical exercise training on sickness absence and job performance among office workers: a randomized controlled trial Christensen, JR. 1, Sjøgaard, G. 1, Søgaard, K. 1, Justesen, JB. 1 SDU (Odense, Denmark) Introduction Physical training may improve health and decrease the risk of sickness absence and low job performance. The aim of this paper was thus to investigate the effect of individually tailored intelligent physical exercise training (IPET) on sickness absence and job performance among office workers. Methods In a randomized controlled trial employees from six companies located across Denmark were allocated to a training group, TG, (N = 194) or a control group, CG, (N = 195). The TG received one-hour high intensity IPET every week within working hours, and was recommended to perform 30 minutes of moderate intensity physical activity six days a week during leisure time. The principles of IPET have previously been described in details (Sjogaard, Justesen et al. 2014). Before and after the one-year intervention the office workers answered a questionnaire on work ability (ten-step ordinal scale), productivity (ten-step ordinal scale), and health (five–step ordinal scale). These data were analyzed with ITT. Only short term absence in spells of 1 to 10 days were included in the sickness absence data. Adherence was calculated as the number of completed training sessions out of the total possible training sessions, which ranged from 34 - 37 between the six companies within the one-year time-period. For the per protocol analysis, we set a cut-point of ≥70 % for adherence. Results At baseline, there were no differences between training and control group. The participants were on average 44 ± 10.4 years old, 75% were female and had an average BMI of 25.4 ± 5.1 kg/m2 and an average percentage body fat of 29.1 ± 8.8%. After one year, an ITT analysis showed that TG had a significant increase in workability from 8,7 to 9,0 (p = <0.001), productivity from 8,2 to 8,6 (p = 0.054) and general health from 3,5 to 3,8 (p = <0.001) compared to the CG but there was no change in sickness absence between the two groups. A per protocol analysis, where 89 (46%) office workers participated ≥70 % showed a significant 6% improvement in job performance (p = <0.001), and 56 % decrease in sickness absence (p = <0.001) compared to the CG from baseline to one-year follow-up. Sickness absence were at baseline mean 4,4 days in TG and 3,5 days in CG. Discussion One-hour high intensity IPET in working hours combined with recommendations of 30 minutes daily leisure time moderate intensity physical activity improved job performance and decreased sickness absence if adhering to the intervention protocol. Overall, these results underline the effectiveness and corporate incentives of implementing IPET at the workplace. Reference Sjøgaard G., Justesen JB, Murray M, Dalager T, Søgaard K. (2014). BMC Public Health, (14), 652. Contact jrchristensen@health.sdu.dk

M3 - Conference abstract for conference

ER -