The effect of co-morbid depression and anxiety on the course and outcome of alcohol outpatient treatment

a naturalistic prospective cohort study

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

Background: Studies examining the effect of alcohol treatment among patients with alcohol use disorders (AUD) and co-morbid depression and/or anxiety are few and show inconsistent, but mainly negative drinking outcomes. Aims: To describe the prevalence of anxiety and depression among Danish patients seeking treatment for an AUD, and to investigate the infl uence of psychiatric co-morbidity on the course and effect of treatment. Method: A consecutive sample
of 363 outpatients with an AUD diagnosis according to the ICD-10 Diagnostic Criteria for Research was assessed by the means of the Addiction Severity Index at treatment start and 276 (76%) followed up after 1 year. Results: 15.7% of the patients suffered from depression and 12.7% from anxiety at baseline. Both patients with or without co-morbidity had improved on drinking outcome measures at follow-up with medium to large effect sizes. No difference was
found between patients with and without co-morbidity. Conclusion: In contrast to the majority of prior studies, this study provides evidence that depression and anxiety do not have an effect on alcohol treatment. However, because of the naturalistic setting, a number of limitations should be taken into consideration interpreting the results.
OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftNordic Journal of Psychiatry
Vol/bind69
Udgave nummer5
Sider (fra-til)331-338
ISSN0803-9488
DOI
StatusUdgivet - jul. 2015

Citer dette

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title = "The effect of co-morbid depression and anxiety on the course and outcome of alcohol outpatient treatment: a naturalistic prospective cohort study",
abstract = "Background: Studies examining the effect of alcohol treatment among patients with alcohol use disorders (AUD) and co-morbid depression and/or anxiety are few and show inconsistent, but mainly negative drinking outcomes. Aims: To describe the prevalence of anxiety and depression among Danish patients seeking treatment for an AUD, and to investigate the infl uence of psychiatric co-morbidity on the course and effect of treatment. Method: A consecutive sampleof 363 outpatients with an AUD diagnosis according to the ICD-10 Diagnostic Criteria for Research was assessed by the means of the Addiction Severity Index at treatment start and 276 (76{\%}) followed up after 1 year. Results: 15.7{\%} of the patients suffered from depression and 12.7{\%} from anxiety at baseline. Both patients with or without co-morbidity had improved on drinking outcome measures at follow-up with medium to large effect sizes. No difference wasfound between patients with and without co-morbidity. Conclusion: In contrast to the majority of prior studies, this study provides evidence that depression and anxiety do not have an effect on alcohol treatment. However, because of the naturalistic setting, a number of limitations should be taken into consideration interpreting the results.",
author = "Mellentin, {Angelina Isabella} and Bent Nielsen and Elsebeth Stenager and Nielsen, {Anette S{\o}gaard}",
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pages = "331--338",
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TY - JOUR

T1 - The effect of co-morbid depression and anxiety on the course and outcome of alcohol outpatient treatment

T2 - a naturalistic prospective cohort study

AU - Mellentin, Angelina Isabella

AU - Nielsen, Bent

AU - Stenager, Elsebeth

AU - Nielsen, Anette Søgaard

PY - 2015/7

Y1 - 2015/7

N2 - Background: Studies examining the effect of alcohol treatment among patients with alcohol use disorders (AUD) and co-morbid depression and/or anxiety are few and show inconsistent, but mainly negative drinking outcomes. Aims: To describe the prevalence of anxiety and depression among Danish patients seeking treatment for an AUD, and to investigate the infl uence of psychiatric co-morbidity on the course and effect of treatment. Method: A consecutive sampleof 363 outpatients with an AUD diagnosis according to the ICD-10 Diagnostic Criteria for Research was assessed by the means of the Addiction Severity Index at treatment start and 276 (76%) followed up after 1 year. Results: 15.7% of the patients suffered from depression and 12.7% from anxiety at baseline. Both patients with or without co-morbidity had improved on drinking outcome measures at follow-up with medium to large effect sizes. No difference wasfound between patients with and without co-morbidity. Conclusion: In contrast to the majority of prior studies, this study provides evidence that depression and anxiety do not have an effect on alcohol treatment. However, because of the naturalistic setting, a number of limitations should be taken into consideration interpreting the results.

AB - Background: Studies examining the effect of alcohol treatment among patients with alcohol use disorders (AUD) and co-morbid depression and/or anxiety are few and show inconsistent, but mainly negative drinking outcomes. Aims: To describe the prevalence of anxiety and depression among Danish patients seeking treatment for an AUD, and to investigate the infl uence of psychiatric co-morbidity on the course and effect of treatment. Method: A consecutive sampleof 363 outpatients with an AUD diagnosis according to the ICD-10 Diagnostic Criteria for Research was assessed by the means of the Addiction Severity Index at treatment start and 276 (76%) followed up after 1 year. Results: 15.7% of the patients suffered from depression and 12.7% from anxiety at baseline. Both patients with or without co-morbidity had improved on drinking outcome measures at follow-up with medium to large effect sizes. No difference wasfound between patients with and without co-morbidity. Conclusion: In contrast to the majority of prior studies, this study provides evidence that depression and anxiety do not have an effect on alcohol treatment. However, because of the naturalistic setting, a number of limitations should be taken into consideration interpreting the results.

U2 - 10.3109/08039488.2014.981857

DO - 10.3109/08039488.2014.981857

M3 - Journal article

VL - 69

SP - 331

EP - 338

JO - Nordic Journal of Psychiatry

JF - Nordic Journal of Psychiatry

SN - 0803-9488

IS - 5

ER -