The association between supportive relatives and lower occurrence of anxiety and depression in heart patients

results from a nationwide survey

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

BACKGROUND: Approximately 30-40% of heart patients develop anxiety and/or depression, which might influence recovery and long-term survival. Research has suggested that support from relatives may decrease anxiety and depression among heart patients; however, the results are inconsistent and often based on small study populations.

AIM: The paper aimed to investigate the association between having supportive relatives and the occurrence of anxiety and depression in heart patients.

METHODS: A population-based cross-sectional study among Danish patients diagnosed with ischemic heart disease, atrial fibrillation, heart failure, or heart valve disease. Presence of supportive relatives was measured as the degree to which the patients felt that they had relatives they could count on, while symptoms of anxiety and depression were measured by the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). Multiple logistic regression analyses accounting for confounders were used to examine the association between supportive relatives and anxiety/depression.

RESULTS: The questionnaire was answered by 2496 heart patients, corresponding to 50% of the invited population. Patients with low or some degree of supportive relatives had a higher odds ratio (OR) of anxiety than patients with a high degree (OR = 2.20, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.28-2.37; OR = 1.75, 95% CI: 1.57-3.08, respectively). Likewise, patients with low or some degree of supportive relatives had a higher OR of depression than patients with a high degree (OR = 1.96, 95% CI: 1.40-2.66; OR = 1.93, 95% CI: 1.37-2.60, respectively).

CONCLUSIONS: The presence of supportive relatives was found to be associated with lower occurrence of anxiety and depression. Health professionals should focus on including relatives in the treatment and rehabilitation of heart patients.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftEuropean Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing
Vol/bind16
Udgave nummer8
Sider (fra-til)733-741
ISSN1474-5151
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 2017

Fingeraftryk

Depression
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Surveys and Questionnaires
Population
Cross-Sectional Studies
Logistic Models
Regression Analysis
Health
Research

Citer dette

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title = "The association between supportive relatives and lower occurrence of anxiety and depression in heart patients: results from a nationwide survey",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: Approximately 30-40{\%} of heart patients develop anxiety and/or depression, which might influence recovery and long-term survival. Research has suggested that support from relatives may decrease anxiety and depression among heart patients; however, the results are inconsistent and often based on small study populations.AIM: The paper aimed to investigate the association between having supportive relatives and the occurrence of anxiety and depression in heart patients.METHODS: A population-based cross-sectional study among Danish patients diagnosed with ischemic heart disease, atrial fibrillation, heart failure, or heart valve disease. Presence of supportive relatives was measured as the degree to which the patients felt that they had relatives they could count on, while symptoms of anxiety and depression were measured by the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). Multiple logistic regression analyses accounting for confounders were used to examine the association between supportive relatives and anxiety/depression.RESULTS: The questionnaire was answered by 2496 heart patients, corresponding to 50{\%} of the invited population. Patients with low or some degree of supportive relatives had a higher odds ratio (OR) of anxiety than patients with a high degree (OR = 2.20, 95{\%} confidence interval (CI): 1.28-2.37; OR = 1.75, 95{\%} CI: 1.57-3.08, respectively). Likewise, patients with low or some degree of supportive relatives had a higher OR of depression than patients with a high degree (OR = 1.96, 95{\%} CI: 1.40-2.66; OR = 1.93, 95{\%} CI: 1.37-2.60, respectively).CONCLUSIONS: The presence of supportive relatives was found to be associated with lower occurrence of anxiety and depression. Health professionals should focus on including relatives in the treatment and rehabilitation of heart patients.",
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author = "Camilla Hansen and Line Zinckernagel and Nanna Schneekloth and Zwisler, {Ann-Dorthe Olsen} and Teresa Holmberg",
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TY - JOUR

T1 - The association between supportive relatives and lower occurrence of anxiety and depression in heart patients

T2 - results from a nationwide survey

AU - Hansen, Camilla

AU - Zinckernagel, Line

AU - Schneekloth, Nanna

AU - Zwisler, Ann-Dorthe Olsen

AU - Holmberg, Teresa

PY - 2017

Y1 - 2017

N2 - BACKGROUND: Approximately 30-40% of heart patients develop anxiety and/or depression, which might influence recovery and long-term survival. Research has suggested that support from relatives may decrease anxiety and depression among heart patients; however, the results are inconsistent and often based on small study populations.AIM: The paper aimed to investigate the association between having supportive relatives and the occurrence of anxiety and depression in heart patients.METHODS: A population-based cross-sectional study among Danish patients diagnosed with ischemic heart disease, atrial fibrillation, heart failure, or heart valve disease. Presence of supportive relatives was measured as the degree to which the patients felt that they had relatives they could count on, while symptoms of anxiety and depression were measured by the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). Multiple logistic regression analyses accounting for confounders were used to examine the association between supportive relatives and anxiety/depression.RESULTS: The questionnaire was answered by 2496 heart patients, corresponding to 50% of the invited population. Patients with low or some degree of supportive relatives had a higher odds ratio (OR) of anxiety than patients with a high degree (OR = 2.20, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.28-2.37; OR = 1.75, 95% CI: 1.57-3.08, respectively). Likewise, patients with low or some degree of supportive relatives had a higher OR of depression than patients with a high degree (OR = 1.96, 95% CI: 1.40-2.66; OR = 1.93, 95% CI: 1.37-2.60, respectively).CONCLUSIONS: The presence of supportive relatives was found to be associated with lower occurrence of anxiety and depression. Health professionals should focus on including relatives in the treatment and rehabilitation of heart patients.

AB - BACKGROUND: Approximately 30-40% of heart patients develop anxiety and/or depression, which might influence recovery and long-term survival. Research has suggested that support from relatives may decrease anxiety and depression among heart patients; however, the results are inconsistent and often based on small study populations.AIM: The paper aimed to investigate the association between having supportive relatives and the occurrence of anxiety and depression in heart patients.METHODS: A population-based cross-sectional study among Danish patients diagnosed with ischemic heart disease, atrial fibrillation, heart failure, or heart valve disease. Presence of supportive relatives was measured as the degree to which the patients felt that they had relatives they could count on, while symptoms of anxiety and depression were measured by the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). Multiple logistic regression analyses accounting for confounders were used to examine the association between supportive relatives and anxiety/depression.RESULTS: The questionnaire was answered by 2496 heart patients, corresponding to 50% of the invited population. Patients with low or some degree of supportive relatives had a higher odds ratio (OR) of anxiety than patients with a high degree (OR = 2.20, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.28-2.37; OR = 1.75, 95% CI: 1.57-3.08, respectively). Likewise, patients with low or some degree of supportive relatives had a higher OR of depression than patients with a high degree (OR = 1.96, 95% CI: 1.40-2.66; OR = 1.93, 95% CI: 1.37-2.60, respectively).CONCLUSIONS: The presence of supportive relatives was found to be associated with lower occurrence of anxiety and depression. Health professionals should focus on including relatives in the treatment and rehabilitation of heart patients.

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U2 - 10.1177/1474515117715761

DO - 10.1177/1474515117715761

M3 - Journal article

VL - 16

SP - 733

EP - 741

JO - European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing

JF - European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing

SN - 1474-5151

IS - 8

ER -