The association between socioeconomic status and the 30- and 90-day risk of infection after total hip arthroplasty: a registry-based cohort study of 103,901 patients with osteoarthritis

Nina M. Edwards, Claus Varnum, Rob G.H.H. Nelissen, Søren Overgaard, Alma B. Pedersen

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Abstrakt

AIMS: The aim of this study was to examine whether socioeconomic status (SES) is associated with a higher risk of infections following total hip arthroplasty (THA) at 30 and 90 days. METHODS: We obtained individual-based information on SES markers (cohabitation, education, income, and savings) on 103,901 THA patients from Danish health registries between 1 January 1995 and 31 December 2017. The primary outcome measure was any hospital-treated infection (i.e. all infections). The secondary outcomes were further specified to specific hospital-treated infections (pneumonia, urinary tract infection, and periprosthetic joint infection). The primary timepoint was within 90 days. In addition, the outcomes were further evaluated within 30 days. We calculated the cumulative incidence, and used the pseudo-observation method and generalized linear regression to estimate adjusted risk ratios (RRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for each marker. RESULTS: The cumulative incidence of any infection at 90 days was highest in patients who lived alone (1.5% (95% CI 1.3 to 1.6)) versus cohabitant (0.7% (95% CI 0.7 to 0.8)), had the lowest educational achievement (1.1% (95% CI 1.0 to 1.2)) versus highest (0.7% (95% CI 0.5 to 0.8)), had the lowest income (1.6% (95% CI 1.5 to 1.70)) versus highest (0.4% (95% CI 0.3 to 0.5)), or had lowest savings (1.3% (95% CI 1.2 to 1.4)) versus highest (0.7% (95% CI 0.6 to 0.8)). Within 90 days, the RRs for any infection were 1.3 (95% CI 1.2 to 1.4) for patients living alone versus cohabiting, 1.2 (95% CI 1.0 to 1.3) for low education achievement versus high, 1.7 (95% CI 1.4 to 2.1) for low income versus high income, and 1.5 (95% CI 1.4 to 1.8) for low savings versus high savings. The same trends were also seen for any infections within the first 30 days. CONCLUSION: Our study provides evidence that socioeconomic inequality adversely influences the risk of infection after THA, thus contributing to healthcare disparities and inequalities. We found that living alone, low educational achievement, low income, or low savings were associated with higher risks of infections within the first 30 and 90 days after THA. Therefore, the development of targeted intervention strategies with the aim of increasing awareness of patients identified as being at greatest risk is needed to mitigate the impact of SES on the risk of infections following THA. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2022;104-B(2):221-226.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftThe Bone & Joint Journal
Vol/bind104-B
Udgave nummer2
Sider (fra-til)221-226
ISSN2049-4394
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 1. feb. 2022

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