The association between a lifetime history of low back injury in a motor vehicle collision and future low back pain: a population-based cohort study

Paul S. Nolet*, Vicki L. Kristman, Pierre Côté, Linda J. Carroll, J. David Cassidy

*Kontaktforfatter for dette arbejde

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

Purpose: This population-based cohort study investigated the association between a lifetime history of a low back injury in a motor vehicle collision (MVC) and future troublesome low back pain. Participants with a history of a low back injury in a motor vehicle collision who had recovered (no or mild low back pain) were compared to those without a history of injury. Current evidence from two cross-sectional and one prospective study suggests that individuals with a history of a low back injury in a MVC are more likely to experience future LBP. There is a need to test this association prospectively in population-based cohorts with adequate control of known confounders. Methods: We formed a cohort of 789 randomly sampled Saskatchewan adults with no or mild LBP. At baseline, participants were asked if they had ever injured their low back in a MVC. Six and 12 months later, participants were asked about the presence of troublesome LBP (grade II–IV) on the Chronic Pain Grade Questionnaire. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression analysis was used to estimate the association while controlling for known confounders. Results: The follow-up rate was 74.8% (590/789) at 6 months and 64.5% (509/789) at 12 months. There was a positive crude association between a history of low back injury in a MVC and the development of troublesome LBP over a 12-month period (HRR = 2.76; 95% CI 1.42–5.39). Controlling for arthritis reduced this association (HRR = 2.25; 95% CI 1.11–4.56). Adding confounders that may be on the casual pathway (baseline LBP, depression and HRQoL) to the multivariable model further reduced the association (HRR = 2.20; 95% CI 1.04–4.68). Conclusion: Our analysis suggests that a history of low back injury in a MVC is a risk factor for developing future troublesome LBP. The consequences of a low back injury in a MVC can predispose individuals to experience recurrent episodes of low back pain.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftEuropean Spine Journal
Vol/bind27
Udgave nummer1
Sider (fra-til)136-144
ISSN0940-6719
DOI
StatusUdgivet - jan. 2018

Fingeraftryk

Back Injuries
Motor Vehicles
Low Back Pain
Cohort Studies
Population
Saskatchewan
Chronic Pain
Regression Analysis
Prospective Studies
Wounds and Injuries

Citer dette

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title = "The association between a lifetime history of low back injury in a motor vehicle collision and future low back pain: a population-based cohort study",
abstract = "Purpose: This population-based cohort study investigated the association between a lifetime history of a low back injury in a motor vehicle collision (MVC) and future troublesome low back pain. Participants with a history of a low back injury in a motor vehicle collision who had recovered (no or mild low back pain) were compared to those without a history of injury. Current evidence from two cross-sectional and one prospective study suggests that individuals with a history of a low back injury in a MVC are more likely to experience future LBP. There is a need to test this association prospectively in population-based cohorts with adequate control of known confounders. Methods: We formed a cohort of 789 randomly sampled Saskatchewan adults with no or mild LBP. At baseline, participants were asked if they had ever injured their low back in a MVC. Six and 12 months later, participants were asked about the presence of troublesome LBP (grade II–IV) on the Chronic Pain Grade Questionnaire. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression analysis was used to estimate the association while controlling for known confounders. Results: The follow-up rate was 74.8{\%} (590/789) at 6 months and 64.5{\%} (509/789) at 12 months. There was a positive crude association between a history of low back injury in a MVC and the development of troublesome LBP over a 12-month period (HRR = 2.76; 95{\%} CI 1.42–5.39). Controlling for arthritis reduced this association (HRR = 2.25; 95{\%} CI 1.11–4.56). Adding confounders that may be on the casual pathway (baseline LBP, depression and HRQoL) to the multivariable model further reduced the association (HRR = 2.20; 95{\%} CI 1.04–4.68). Conclusion: Our analysis suggests that a history of low back injury in a MVC is a risk factor for developing future troublesome LBP. The consequences of a low back injury in a MVC can predispose individuals to experience recurrent episodes of low back pain.",
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author = "Nolet, {Paul S.} and Kristman, {Vicki L.} and Pierre C{\^o}t{\'e} and Carroll, {Linda J.} and Cassidy, {J. David}",
year = "2018",
month = "1",
doi = "10.1007/s00586-017-5090-y",
language = "English",
volume = "27",
pages = "136--144",
journal = "European Spine Journal",
issn = "0940-6719",
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The association between a lifetime history of low back injury in a motor vehicle collision and future low back pain : a population-based cohort study. / Nolet, Paul S.; Kristman, Vicki L.; Côté, Pierre; Carroll, Linda J.; Cassidy, J. David.

I: European Spine Journal, Bind 27, Nr. 1, 01.2018, s. 136-144.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - The association between a lifetime history of low back injury in a motor vehicle collision and future low back pain

T2 - a population-based cohort study

AU - Nolet, Paul S.

AU - Kristman, Vicki L.

AU - Côté, Pierre

AU - Carroll, Linda J.

AU - Cassidy, J. David

PY - 2018/1

Y1 - 2018/1

N2 - Purpose: This population-based cohort study investigated the association between a lifetime history of a low back injury in a motor vehicle collision (MVC) and future troublesome low back pain. Participants with a history of a low back injury in a motor vehicle collision who had recovered (no or mild low back pain) were compared to those without a history of injury. Current evidence from two cross-sectional and one prospective study suggests that individuals with a history of a low back injury in a MVC are more likely to experience future LBP. There is a need to test this association prospectively in population-based cohorts with adequate control of known confounders. Methods: We formed a cohort of 789 randomly sampled Saskatchewan adults with no or mild LBP. At baseline, participants were asked if they had ever injured their low back in a MVC. Six and 12 months later, participants were asked about the presence of troublesome LBP (grade II–IV) on the Chronic Pain Grade Questionnaire. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression analysis was used to estimate the association while controlling for known confounders. Results: The follow-up rate was 74.8% (590/789) at 6 months and 64.5% (509/789) at 12 months. There was a positive crude association between a history of low back injury in a MVC and the development of troublesome LBP over a 12-month period (HRR = 2.76; 95% CI 1.42–5.39). Controlling for arthritis reduced this association (HRR = 2.25; 95% CI 1.11–4.56). Adding confounders that may be on the casual pathway (baseline LBP, depression and HRQoL) to the multivariable model further reduced the association (HRR = 2.20; 95% CI 1.04–4.68). Conclusion: Our analysis suggests that a history of low back injury in a MVC is a risk factor for developing future troublesome LBP. The consequences of a low back injury in a MVC can predispose individuals to experience recurrent episodes of low back pain.

AB - Purpose: This population-based cohort study investigated the association between a lifetime history of a low back injury in a motor vehicle collision (MVC) and future troublesome low back pain. Participants with a history of a low back injury in a motor vehicle collision who had recovered (no or mild low back pain) were compared to those without a history of injury. Current evidence from two cross-sectional and one prospective study suggests that individuals with a history of a low back injury in a MVC are more likely to experience future LBP. There is a need to test this association prospectively in population-based cohorts with adequate control of known confounders. Methods: We formed a cohort of 789 randomly sampled Saskatchewan adults with no or mild LBP. At baseline, participants were asked if they had ever injured their low back in a MVC. Six and 12 months later, participants were asked about the presence of troublesome LBP (grade II–IV) on the Chronic Pain Grade Questionnaire. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression analysis was used to estimate the association while controlling for known confounders. Results: The follow-up rate was 74.8% (590/789) at 6 months and 64.5% (509/789) at 12 months. There was a positive crude association between a history of low back injury in a MVC and the development of troublesome LBP over a 12-month period (HRR = 2.76; 95% CI 1.42–5.39). Controlling for arthritis reduced this association (HRR = 2.25; 95% CI 1.11–4.56). Adding confounders that may be on the casual pathway (baseline LBP, depression and HRQoL) to the multivariable model further reduced the association (HRR = 2.20; 95% CI 1.04–4.68). Conclusion: Our analysis suggests that a history of low back injury in a MVC is a risk factor for developing future troublesome LBP. The consequences of a low back injury in a MVC can predispose individuals to experience recurrent episodes of low back pain.

KW - Cohort studies

KW - Low back pain

KW - Risk factors

KW - Traffic accidents

KW - Whiplash injuries

KW - Accidents, Traffic/statistics & numerical data

KW - Prospective Studies

KW - Cross-Sectional Studies

KW - Follow-Up Studies

KW - Humans

KW - Middle Aged

KW - Risk Factors

KW - Male

KW - Saskatchewan

KW - Low Back Pain/epidemiology

KW - Back Injuries/complications

KW - Adult

KW - Female

KW - Surveys and Questionnaires

KW - Cohort Studies

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U2 - 10.1007/s00586-017-5090-y

DO - 10.1007/s00586-017-5090-y

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 28391385

AN - SCOPUS:85017093279

VL - 27

SP - 136

EP - 144

JO - European Spine Journal

JF - European Spine Journal

SN - 0940-6719

IS - 1

ER -