The ageing body in Monty Python Live (Mostly)

Line Nybro Petersen*

*Kontaktforfatter for dette arbejde

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

This paper analyses representations of the ageing body in the live televised show Monty Python Live (Mostly) (2014). The famous satire group performed in the O2 arena in London, and the show was telecast live in cinemas and aired on television across the world. In the show, the group members, now in their seventies, reprise a series of their most popular sketches and introduce a few new sketches. This analysis focuses on the ways in which representations of the ageing body intersects with representations of gender and sexuality in order to discuss how the boundaries for appropriation and subversion becomes blurred in the context of the show. This paper combines theory of mediatization with cultural gerontology and feminist theory in order to bring these issues to light. I argue that the show offers an appropriation of the female ageing body -- often exemplified through cross-dressing -- but also a subversion of sexuality for ageing bodies (both male and female).
OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftEuropean Journal of Cultural Studies
Vol/bind21
Udgave nummer3
Sider (fra-til)382–394
ISSN1367-5494
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 2018

Fingeraftryk

subversion
sexuality
mediatization
gerontology
satire
cinema
group membership
television
Monty Python
gender
Group
Sexuality
Subversion
Appropriation
Female Body
Cinema
Feminist Theory
Gerontology
Reprise
Mediatization

Emneord

  • Monty Python
  • television comedy
  • cultural gerontology
  • ageing bodies
  • gender
  • sexuality

Citer dette

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The ageing body in Monty Python Live (Mostly). / Petersen, Line Nybro.

I: European Journal of Cultural Studies, Bind 21, Nr. 3, 2018, s. 382–394.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

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