Ten-year prevalence of mental disorders in patients presenting with chronic pain in secondary care: A register linkage cohort study

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Resumé

BACKGROUND: Prevalence rates of mental disorders in patients with chronic pain vary and may be overestimated when assessed by screening instruments only. Objectives were to estimate the 10-year prevalence of different mental disorders diagnosed by psychiatrists in patients with chronic pain compared with the Danish general population.

METHODS: Patients (n = 7197) consulted in the interdisciplinary Pain Clinic South at Odense University Hospital, Denmark, from 2005 to 2015 were included. Data from the Pain Clinic were linked to the Danish National Patient Register-Psychiatry and the Danish Civil Registration System. Age and gender standardized prevalence ratios (SPR) were calculated.

RESULTS: In all, 17.8% of patients with chronic pain had been diagnosed with a mental disorder. The most frequent diagnoses were adjustment disorders (subcategory of anxiety disorders) (8.9%), depression (6.1%), personality disorders (3.8%), and substance abuse disorders (3.5%). Women and men with chronic pain had higher rates of anxiety disorders (SPR 3.1; 95% CI 2.9-3.4) and depression (SPR 2.5; 95% CI 2.3-2.8), whereas men had higher rates of substance abuse disorders (SPR 1.6; 95% CI 1.3-1.9) than found for the general population.

CONCLUSIONS: Although depression and anxiety were noted more frequently among patients with chronic pain than the general population, prevalence rates were lower than previously reported. The most frequent diagnoses were adjustment disorders.

SIGNIFICANCE: Prevalence rates of anxiety and depression diagnosed by psychiatrists in patients with chronic pain were found to be lower than previous findings using screening instruments. Adjustment disorders were the most frequent disorders diagnosed, as this study is the first to investigate.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftEuropean Journal of Pain
Vol/bind22
Udgave nummer2
Sider (fra-til)346-354
ISSN1090-3801
DOI
StatusUdgivet - feb. 2018

Fingeraftryk

Chronic Pain
Cohort Studies
Adjustment Disorders
Depression
Pain Clinics
Population
Denmark

Citer dette

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title = "Ten-year prevalence of mental disorders in patients presenting with chronic pain in secondary care: A register linkage cohort study",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: Prevalence rates of mental disorders in patients with chronic pain vary and may be overestimated when assessed by screening instruments only. Objectives were to estimate the 10-year prevalence of different mental disorders diagnosed by psychiatrists in patients with chronic pain compared with the Danish general population.METHODS: Patients (n = 7197) consulted in the interdisciplinary Pain Clinic South at Odense University Hospital, Denmark, from 2005 to 2015 were included. Data from the Pain Clinic were linked to the Danish National Patient Register-Psychiatry and the Danish Civil Registration System. Age and gender standardized prevalence ratios (SPR) were calculated.RESULTS: In all, 17.8{\%} of patients with chronic pain had been diagnosed with a mental disorder. The most frequent diagnoses were adjustment disorders (subcategory of anxiety disorders) (8.9{\%}), depression (6.1{\%}), personality disorders (3.8{\%}), and substance abuse disorders (3.5{\%}). Women and men with chronic pain had higher rates of anxiety disorders (SPR 3.1; 95{\%} CI 2.9-3.4) and depression (SPR 2.5; 95{\%} CI 2.3-2.8), whereas men had higher rates of substance abuse disorders (SPR 1.6; 95{\%} CI 1.3-1.9) than found for the general population.CONCLUSIONS: Although depression and anxiety were noted more frequently among patients with chronic pain than the general population, prevalence rates were lower than previously reported. The most frequent diagnoses were adjustment disorders.SIGNIFICANCE: Prevalence rates of anxiety and depression diagnosed by psychiatrists in patients with chronic pain were found to be lower than previous findings using screening instruments. Adjustment disorders were the most frequent disorders diagnosed, as this study is the first to investigate.",
keywords = "Adolescent, Adult, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Chronic Pain/epidemiology, Cohort Studies, Comorbidity, Denmark/epidemiology, Female, Humans, Male, Mental Disorders/epidemiology, Middle Aged, Prevalence, Secondary Care, Young Adult",
author = "S S{\o}nderg{\aa}rd and Vaegter, {H B} and A Erlangsen and E Stenager",
note = "{\circledC} 2017 European Pain Federation - EFIC{\circledR}.",
year = "2018",
month = "2",
doi = "10.1002/ejp.1124",
language = "English",
volume = "22",
pages = "346--354",
journal = "European Journal of Pain",
issn = "1090-3801",
publisher = "JohnWiley & Sons Ltd.",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Ten-year prevalence of mental disorders in patients presenting with chronic pain in secondary care

T2 - A register linkage cohort study

AU - Søndergård, S

AU - Vaegter, H B

AU - Erlangsen, A

AU - Stenager, E

N1 - © 2017 European Pain Federation - EFIC®.

PY - 2018/2

Y1 - 2018/2

N2 - BACKGROUND: Prevalence rates of mental disorders in patients with chronic pain vary and may be overestimated when assessed by screening instruments only. Objectives were to estimate the 10-year prevalence of different mental disorders diagnosed by psychiatrists in patients with chronic pain compared with the Danish general population.METHODS: Patients (n = 7197) consulted in the interdisciplinary Pain Clinic South at Odense University Hospital, Denmark, from 2005 to 2015 were included. Data from the Pain Clinic were linked to the Danish National Patient Register-Psychiatry and the Danish Civil Registration System. Age and gender standardized prevalence ratios (SPR) were calculated.RESULTS: In all, 17.8% of patients with chronic pain had been diagnosed with a mental disorder. The most frequent diagnoses were adjustment disorders (subcategory of anxiety disorders) (8.9%), depression (6.1%), personality disorders (3.8%), and substance abuse disorders (3.5%). Women and men with chronic pain had higher rates of anxiety disorders (SPR 3.1; 95% CI 2.9-3.4) and depression (SPR 2.5; 95% CI 2.3-2.8), whereas men had higher rates of substance abuse disorders (SPR 1.6; 95% CI 1.3-1.9) than found for the general population.CONCLUSIONS: Although depression and anxiety were noted more frequently among patients with chronic pain than the general population, prevalence rates were lower than previously reported. The most frequent diagnoses were adjustment disorders.SIGNIFICANCE: Prevalence rates of anxiety and depression diagnosed by psychiatrists in patients with chronic pain were found to be lower than previous findings using screening instruments. Adjustment disorders were the most frequent disorders diagnosed, as this study is the first to investigate.

AB - BACKGROUND: Prevalence rates of mental disorders in patients with chronic pain vary and may be overestimated when assessed by screening instruments only. Objectives were to estimate the 10-year prevalence of different mental disorders diagnosed by psychiatrists in patients with chronic pain compared with the Danish general population.METHODS: Patients (n = 7197) consulted in the interdisciplinary Pain Clinic South at Odense University Hospital, Denmark, from 2005 to 2015 were included. Data from the Pain Clinic were linked to the Danish National Patient Register-Psychiatry and the Danish Civil Registration System. Age and gender standardized prevalence ratios (SPR) were calculated.RESULTS: In all, 17.8% of patients with chronic pain had been diagnosed with a mental disorder. The most frequent diagnoses were adjustment disorders (subcategory of anxiety disorders) (8.9%), depression (6.1%), personality disorders (3.8%), and substance abuse disorders (3.5%). Women and men with chronic pain had higher rates of anxiety disorders (SPR 3.1; 95% CI 2.9-3.4) and depression (SPR 2.5; 95% CI 2.3-2.8), whereas men had higher rates of substance abuse disorders (SPR 1.6; 95% CI 1.3-1.9) than found for the general population.CONCLUSIONS: Although depression and anxiety were noted more frequently among patients with chronic pain than the general population, prevalence rates were lower than previously reported. The most frequent diagnoses were adjustment disorders.SIGNIFICANCE: Prevalence rates of anxiety and depression diagnosed by psychiatrists in patients with chronic pain were found to be lower than previous findings using screening instruments. Adjustment disorders were the most frequent disorders diagnosed, as this study is the first to investigate.

KW - Adolescent

KW - Adult

KW - Aged

KW - Aged, 80 and over

KW - Chronic Pain/epidemiology

KW - Cohort Studies

KW - Comorbidity

KW - Denmark/epidemiology

KW - Female

KW - Humans

KW - Male

KW - Mental Disorders/epidemiology

KW - Middle Aged

KW - Prevalence

KW - Secondary Care

KW - Young Adult

U2 - 10.1002/ejp.1124

DO - 10.1002/ejp.1124

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 28971547

VL - 22

SP - 346

EP - 354

JO - European Journal of Pain

JF - European Journal of Pain

SN - 1090-3801

IS - 2

ER -