Telemedicine in specialised palliative care: Healthcare Professionals and their perspectives on video consultations: - A Qualitative Study

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Resumé

Aims and objectives: To explore the advantages and disadvantages of using video consultations, as experienced by specialised palliative care healthcare professionals, who are involved in palliative care at home. Background: One challenge in the work of specialised palliative care teams is the substantial resources used in terms of time and transport to and from the patient's home. Video consultations may be a solution for real-time specialised palliative home care. Designs: Hermeneutic, postphenomenology. Methods: An explorative qualitative study utilising data from field notes of an autobiographical diary, participant observations and semi-structured interviews with healthcare professionals. The COREQ guideline was used for reporting the study. See Appendix S1. The data collection took place in patients' homes and at the Department of Oncology, Odense University Hospital, Denmark. Results: Eight participants (n = 8); five community nurses; and three specialised palliative care team members—a head physician, a physiotherapist and a nurse—participated in the study. The healthcare professionals' knowledge was based on n = 82 video consultations with 11 patients. The range of video consultations was 3–18 per patient. The use of tablets in video consultations facilitated direct palliative care and led the community nurses and the specialised palliative care team nurse to co-operate. Potential barriers against using video consultations are the discussions about personal, and private issues regarding the illness, while family members are present. Conclusions: Video consultations in specialised palliative home care are feasible, and the technology can facilitate multidisciplinary participation and co-operation among healthcare professionals. The continuous use of video consultations over time may increase the quality of specialised palliative home care. Relevance to clinical practice: The use of video consultations can provide direct specialised palliative care over distance involving healthcare professionals, patients and their relatives.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftJournal of Clinical Nursing
Vol/bind28
Udgave nummer21-22
Sider (fra-til)3966-3976
ISSN0962-1067
DOI
StatusUdgivet - nov. 2019

Fingeraftryk

Palliative Care
Referral and Consultation
Delivery of Health Care
Home Care Services
Nurses
Physical Therapists
Denmark
Guidelines
Interviews
Physicians

Bibliografisk note

This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Citer dette

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title = "Telemedicine in specialised palliative care: Healthcare Professionals and their perspectives on video consultations: - A Qualitative Study",
abstract = "Aims and objectives: To explore the advantages and disadvantages of using video consultations, as experienced by specialised palliative care healthcare professionals, who are involved in palliative care at home. Background: One challenge in the work of specialised palliative care teams is the substantial resources used in terms of time and transport to and from the patient's home. Video consultations may be a solution for real-time specialised palliative home care. Designs: Hermeneutic, postphenomenology. Methods: An explorative qualitative study utilising data from field notes of an autobiographical diary, participant observations and semi-structured interviews with healthcare professionals. The COREQ guideline was used for reporting the study. See Appendix S1. The data collection took place in patients' homes and at the Department of Oncology, Odense University Hospital, Denmark. Results: Eight participants (n = 8); five community nurses; and three specialised palliative care team members—a head physician, a physiotherapist and a nurse—participated in the study. The healthcare professionals' knowledge was based on n = 82 video consultations with 11 patients. The range of video consultations was 3–18 per patient. The use of tablets in video consultations facilitated direct palliative care and led the community nurses and the specialised palliative care team nurse to co-operate. Potential barriers against using video consultations are the discussions about personal, and private issues regarding the illness, while family members are present. Conclusions: Video consultations in specialised palliative home care are feasible, and the technology can facilitate multidisciplinary participation and co-operation among healthcare professionals. The continuous use of video consultations over time may increase the quality of specialised palliative home care. Relevance to clinical practice: The use of video consultations can provide direct specialised palliative care over distance involving healthcare professionals, patients and their relatives.",
keywords = "nursing, oncology, qualitative research, specialised palliative care, telemedicine",
author = "Funderskov, {Karen Frydenrejn} and Danbj{\o}rg, {Dorthe Boe} and Mia Jess and Lene Munk and Zwisler, {Ann-Dorthe Olsen} and Dieperink, {Karin B}",
note = "This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.",
year = "2019",
month = "11",
doi = "10.1111/jocn.15004",
language = "English",
volume = "28",
pages = "3966--3976",
journal = "Journal of Clinical Nursing",
issn = "0962-1067",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
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}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Telemedicine in specialised palliative care

T2 - Healthcare Professionals and their perspectives on video consultations: - A Qualitative Study

AU - Funderskov, Karen Frydenrejn

AU - Danbjørg, Dorthe Boe

AU - Jess, Mia

AU - Munk, Lene

AU - Zwisler, Ann-Dorthe Olsen

AU - Dieperink, Karin B

N1 - This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

PY - 2019/11

Y1 - 2019/11

N2 - Aims and objectives: To explore the advantages and disadvantages of using video consultations, as experienced by specialised palliative care healthcare professionals, who are involved in palliative care at home. Background: One challenge in the work of specialised palliative care teams is the substantial resources used in terms of time and transport to and from the patient's home. Video consultations may be a solution for real-time specialised palliative home care. Designs: Hermeneutic, postphenomenology. Methods: An explorative qualitative study utilising data from field notes of an autobiographical diary, participant observations and semi-structured interviews with healthcare professionals. The COREQ guideline was used for reporting the study. See Appendix S1. The data collection took place in patients' homes and at the Department of Oncology, Odense University Hospital, Denmark. Results: Eight participants (n = 8); five community nurses; and three specialised palliative care team members—a head physician, a physiotherapist and a nurse—participated in the study. The healthcare professionals' knowledge was based on n = 82 video consultations with 11 patients. The range of video consultations was 3–18 per patient. The use of tablets in video consultations facilitated direct palliative care and led the community nurses and the specialised palliative care team nurse to co-operate. Potential barriers against using video consultations are the discussions about personal, and private issues regarding the illness, while family members are present. Conclusions: Video consultations in specialised palliative home care are feasible, and the technology can facilitate multidisciplinary participation and co-operation among healthcare professionals. The continuous use of video consultations over time may increase the quality of specialised palliative home care. Relevance to clinical practice: The use of video consultations can provide direct specialised palliative care over distance involving healthcare professionals, patients and their relatives.

AB - Aims and objectives: To explore the advantages and disadvantages of using video consultations, as experienced by specialised palliative care healthcare professionals, who are involved in palliative care at home. Background: One challenge in the work of specialised palliative care teams is the substantial resources used in terms of time and transport to and from the patient's home. Video consultations may be a solution for real-time specialised palliative home care. Designs: Hermeneutic, postphenomenology. Methods: An explorative qualitative study utilising data from field notes of an autobiographical diary, participant observations and semi-structured interviews with healthcare professionals. The COREQ guideline was used for reporting the study. See Appendix S1. The data collection took place in patients' homes and at the Department of Oncology, Odense University Hospital, Denmark. Results: Eight participants (n = 8); five community nurses; and three specialised palliative care team members—a head physician, a physiotherapist and a nurse—participated in the study. The healthcare professionals' knowledge was based on n = 82 video consultations with 11 patients. The range of video consultations was 3–18 per patient. The use of tablets in video consultations facilitated direct palliative care and led the community nurses and the specialised palliative care team nurse to co-operate. Potential barriers against using video consultations are the discussions about personal, and private issues regarding the illness, while family members are present. Conclusions: Video consultations in specialised palliative home care are feasible, and the technology can facilitate multidisciplinary participation and co-operation among healthcare professionals. The continuous use of video consultations over time may increase the quality of specialised palliative home care. Relevance to clinical practice: The use of video consultations can provide direct specialised palliative care over distance involving healthcare professionals, patients and their relatives.

KW - nursing

KW - oncology

KW - qualitative research

KW - specialised palliative care

KW - telemedicine

U2 - 10.1111/jocn.15004

DO - 10.1111/jocn.15004

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 31328336

VL - 28

SP - 3966

EP - 3976

JO - Journal of Clinical Nursing

JF - Journal of Clinical Nursing

SN - 0962-1067

IS - 21-22

ER -