Targeting pregnancy as a time to treat obesity

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

Maternal obesity is recognized as one of the largest contributors to compromised health during pregnancy. Lifestyle interventions in obese pregnant women may be able to reduce gestational weight gain (GWG) but have shown limited success in improving pregnancy and neonatal outcomes. Lack of statistical power, poor compliance and inconsistency in inclusion BMI and setting across studies may be some of the reasons. Since pregestational BMI is the single most important predictor of obesity-related complications, the metabolic profile in the first trimester of pregnancy may play a very important role. Observational studies have shown that interpregnancy weight loss reduces the risk of macrosomia in a subsequent pregnancy. Future lifestyle randomized controlled trials should target the prepregnant state and examine the effect on maternal and neonatal outcomes.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftExpert Review of Endocrinology & Metabolism
Vol/bind10
Udgave nummer5
Sider (fra-til)491-497
ISSN1744-6651
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 2015

Fingeraftryk

Mothers
First Pregnancy Trimester
Weight Gain
Pregnant Women
Randomized Controlled Trials
Health

Citer dette

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abstract = "Maternal obesity is recognized as one of the largest contributors to compromised health during pregnancy. Lifestyle interventions in obese pregnant women may be able to reduce gestational weight gain (GWG) but have shown limited success in improving pregnancy and neonatal outcomes. Lack of statistical power, poor compliance and inconsistency in inclusion BMI and setting across studies may be some of the reasons. Since pregestational BMI is the single most important predictor of obesity-related complications, the metabolic profile in the first trimester of pregnancy may play a very important role. Observational studies have shown that interpregnancy weight loss reduces the risk of macrosomia in a subsequent pregnancy. Future lifestyle randomized controlled trials should target the prepregnant state and examine the effect on maternal and neonatal outcomes.",
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Targeting pregnancy as a time to treat obesity. / Vinter, Christina Anne; Nøhr, Ellen Aagaard .

I: Expert Review of Endocrinology & Metabolism, Bind 10, Nr. 5, 2015, s. 491-497.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

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AU - Nøhr, Ellen Aagaard

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AB - Maternal obesity is recognized as one of the largest contributors to compromised health during pregnancy. Lifestyle interventions in obese pregnant women may be able to reduce gestational weight gain (GWG) but have shown limited success in improving pregnancy and neonatal outcomes. Lack of statistical power, poor compliance and inconsistency in inclusion BMI and setting across studies may be some of the reasons. Since pregestational BMI is the single most important predictor of obesity-related complications, the metabolic profile in the first trimester of pregnancy may play a very important role. Observational studies have shown that interpregnancy weight loss reduces the risk of macrosomia in a subsequent pregnancy. Future lifestyle randomized controlled trials should target the prepregnant state and examine the effect on maternal and neonatal outcomes.

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