Take a Stand!-a multi-component intervention aimed at reducing sitting time among office workers: a cluster randomized trial

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

BACKGROUND: Prolonged sitting time has been associated with adverse health outcomes. Interventions at work may contribute to reduced sitting. The objective was to test if a multicomponent work-based intervention can reduce sitting time and the number of prolonged sitting periods (> 30 min), increase the number of sit-to-stand transitions and decrease waist circumference and body fat percentage among office workers. Primary outcomes were: change in sitting time, prolonged sitting periods and sit-to-stand transitions at follow-up 1 month later.

METHODS: At four workplaces, 19 offices (317 workers in total) were cluster randomized for intervention or control. The intervention included the appointment of local ambassadors, management support, environmental changes, a lecture and a workshop. Sitting time was measured using an ActiGraph GT3X+ fixed on the thigh. Data were processed using Acti4 software providing data on time spent sitting, standing and doing other activities. Control participants were instructed to behave as usual. Follow-up measurements were obtained after 1 and 3 months.

RESULTS: At 1 and 3 months, total sitting time was 71 (P< 0.001) and 48 min (P< 0.001) lower per 8-h workday in the intervention group compared with the control group. At 1 month, the number of prolonged sitting periods was lower (-0.79/8-h workday,P< 0.001) and sit-to-stand transitions were higher (+14%/sitting hour,P= 0.001) in the intervention compared with the control group. After 3 months, trends persisted. The body fat percentage was lower by 0.61 percentage points (P= 0.011) in the intervention group compared with the control group after 3 months.

CONCLUSIONS: The multicomponent workplace-based intervention was effective in reducing sitting time, prolonged sitting periods and body fat percentage, and in increasing the number of sit-to-stand transitions.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftInternational Journal of Epidemiology
Vol/bind46
Udgave nummer1
Sider (fra-til)128-140
ISSN0300-5771
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 2017

Fingeraftryk

Adipose Tissue
Workplace
Control Groups
Education
Health

Citer dette

@article{04994c036ffe4a2e91a9d92a16ead54c,
title = "Take a Stand!-a multi-component intervention aimed at reducing sitting time among office workers: a cluster randomized trial",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: Prolonged sitting time has been associated with adverse health outcomes. Interventions at work may contribute to reduced sitting. The objective was to test if a multicomponent work-based intervention can reduce sitting time and the number of prolonged sitting periods (> 30 min), increase the number of sit-to-stand transitions and decrease waist circumference and body fat percentage among office workers. Primary outcomes were: change in sitting time, prolonged sitting periods and sit-to-stand transitions at follow-up 1 month later.METHODS: At four workplaces, 19 offices (317 workers in total) were cluster randomized for intervention or control. The intervention included the appointment of local ambassadors, management support, environmental changes, a lecture and a workshop. Sitting time was measured using an ActiGraph GT3X+ fixed on the thigh. Data were processed using Acti4 software providing data on time spent sitting, standing and doing other activities. Control participants were instructed to behave as usual. Follow-up measurements were obtained after 1 and 3 months.RESULTS: At 1 and 3 months, total sitting time was 71 (P< 0.001) and 48 min (P< 0.001) lower per 8-h workday in the intervention group compared with the control group. At 1 month, the number of prolonged sitting periods was lower (-0.79/8-h workday,P< 0.001) and sit-to-stand transitions were higher (+14{\%}/sitting hour,P= 0.001) in the intervention compared with the control group. After 3 months, trends persisted. The body fat percentage was lower by 0.61 percentage points (P= 0.011) in the intervention group compared with the control group after 3 months.CONCLUSIONS: The multicomponent workplace-based intervention was effective in reducing sitting time, prolonged sitting periods and body fat percentage, and in increasing the number of sit-to-stand transitions.",
author = "Danquah, {Ida H{\o}gstedt} and Stine Kloster and Andreas Holtermann and M Aadahl and A Bauman and Ersb{\o}ll, {Annette Kj{\ae}r} and Tolstrup, {Janne Schurmann}",
note = "{\circledC} The Author 2016; all rights reserved. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the International Epidemiological Association.",
year = "2017",
doi = "10.1093/ije/dyw009",
language = "English",
volume = "46",
pages = "128--140",
journal = "International Journal of Epidemiology",
issn = "0300-5771",
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Take a Stand!-a multi-component intervention aimed at reducing sitting time among office workers : a cluster randomized trial. / Danquah, Ida Høgstedt ; Kloster, Stine; Holtermann, Andreas; Aadahl, M; Bauman, A; Ersbøll, Annette Kjær; Tolstrup, Janne Schurmann.

I: International Journal of Epidemiology, Bind 46, Nr. 1, 2017, s. 128-140.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Take a Stand!-a multi-component intervention aimed at reducing sitting time among office workers

T2 - a cluster randomized trial

AU - Danquah, Ida Høgstedt

AU - Kloster, Stine

AU - Holtermann, Andreas

AU - Aadahl, M

AU - Bauman, A

AU - Ersbøll, Annette Kjær

AU - Tolstrup, Janne Schurmann

N1 - © The Author 2016; all rights reserved. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the International Epidemiological Association.

PY - 2017

Y1 - 2017

N2 - BACKGROUND: Prolonged sitting time has been associated with adverse health outcomes. Interventions at work may contribute to reduced sitting. The objective was to test if a multicomponent work-based intervention can reduce sitting time and the number of prolonged sitting periods (> 30 min), increase the number of sit-to-stand transitions and decrease waist circumference and body fat percentage among office workers. Primary outcomes were: change in sitting time, prolonged sitting periods and sit-to-stand transitions at follow-up 1 month later.METHODS: At four workplaces, 19 offices (317 workers in total) were cluster randomized for intervention or control. The intervention included the appointment of local ambassadors, management support, environmental changes, a lecture and a workshop. Sitting time was measured using an ActiGraph GT3X+ fixed on the thigh. Data were processed using Acti4 software providing data on time spent sitting, standing and doing other activities. Control participants were instructed to behave as usual. Follow-up measurements were obtained after 1 and 3 months.RESULTS: At 1 and 3 months, total sitting time was 71 (P< 0.001) and 48 min (P< 0.001) lower per 8-h workday in the intervention group compared with the control group. At 1 month, the number of prolonged sitting periods was lower (-0.79/8-h workday,P< 0.001) and sit-to-stand transitions were higher (+14%/sitting hour,P= 0.001) in the intervention compared with the control group. After 3 months, trends persisted. The body fat percentage was lower by 0.61 percentage points (P= 0.011) in the intervention group compared with the control group after 3 months.CONCLUSIONS: The multicomponent workplace-based intervention was effective in reducing sitting time, prolonged sitting periods and body fat percentage, and in increasing the number of sit-to-stand transitions.

AB - BACKGROUND: Prolonged sitting time has been associated with adverse health outcomes. Interventions at work may contribute to reduced sitting. The objective was to test if a multicomponent work-based intervention can reduce sitting time and the number of prolonged sitting periods (> 30 min), increase the number of sit-to-stand transitions and decrease waist circumference and body fat percentage among office workers. Primary outcomes were: change in sitting time, prolonged sitting periods and sit-to-stand transitions at follow-up 1 month later.METHODS: At four workplaces, 19 offices (317 workers in total) were cluster randomized for intervention or control. The intervention included the appointment of local ambassadors, management support, environmental changes, a lecture and a workshop. Sitting time was measured using an ActiGraph GT3X+ fixed on the thigh. Data were processed using Acti4 software providing data on time spent sitting, standing and doing other activities. Control participants were instructed to behave as usual. Follow-up measurements were obtained after 1 and 3 months.RESULTS: At 1 and 3 months, total sitting time was 71 (P< 0.001) and 48 min (P< 0.001) lower per 8-h workday in the intervention group compared with the control group. At 1 month, the number of prolonged sitting periods was lower (-0.79/8-h workday,P< 0.001) and sit-to-stand transitions were higher (+14%/sitting hour,P= 0.001) in the intervention compared with the control group. After 3 months, trends persisted. The body fat percentage was lower by 0.61 percentage points (P= 0.011) in the intervention group compared with the control group after 3 months.CONCLUSIONS: The multicomponent workplace-based intervention was effective in reducing sitting time, prolonged sitting periods and body fat percentage, and in increasing the number of sit-to-stand transitions.

U2 - 10.1093/ije/dyw009

DO - 10.1093/ije/dyw009

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 27094749

VL - 46

SP - 128

EP - 140

JO - International Journal of Epidemiology

JF - International Journal of Epidemiology

SN - 0300-5771

IS - 1

ER -