Systematic review of the risk of Parkinson's disease after mild traumatic brain injury

results of the International Collaboration on Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Prognosis

Connie Marras, Cesar A Hincapié, Vicki L Kristman, Carol Cancelliere, Sophie Soklaridis, Alvin Li, Jörgen Borg, Jean-Luc af Geijerstam, John David Cassidy

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

OBJECTIVE: To synthesize the best available evidence on the risk of Parkinson's disease (PD) after mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI).

DATA SOURCES: MEDLINE and other databases were searched (1990-2012) with terms including "craniocerebral trauma" and "parkinsonian disorders." Reference lists of eligible articles and relevant systematic reviews and meta-analyses were also searched.

STUDY SELECTION: Controlled clinical trials, cohort studies, and case-control studies were selected according to predefined criteria. Studies had to have a minimum of 30 concussion cases.

DATA EXTRACTION: Eligible studies were critically appraised using a modification of the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network criteria. Two reviewers independently reviewed and extracted data from accepted studies into evidence tables.

DATA SYNTHESIS: Evidence was synthesized qualitatively according to modified Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network criteria. Sixty-five studies were eligible and reviewed, and 5 of these with a low risk of bias were accepted as scientifically admissible and form the basis of our findings. Among these admissible studies, the definitions of MTBI were highly heterogeneous. One study found a significant positive association between MTBI and PD (odds ratio, 1.5; 95% confidence interval, 1.4-1.7). The estimated odds ratio decreased with increasing latency between MTBI and PD diagnosis, which suggests reverse causality. The other 4 studies did not find a significant association.

CONCLUSIONS: The best available evidence argues against an important causal association between MTBI and PD. There are few high-quality studies on this topic. Prospective studies of long duration would address the limitations of recall of head injury and the possibility of reverse causation.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftArchives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
Vol/bind95
Udgave nummer3 Suppl
Sider (fra-til)S238-44
ISSN0003-9993
DOI
StatusUdgivet - mar. 2014

Fingeraftryk

Parkinson Disease
Craniocerebral Trauma
Causality
Odds Ratio
Guidelines
Controlled Clinical Trials
MEDLINE
Meta-Analysis
Case-Control Studies
Cohort Studies
Databases
Prospective Studies
Confidence Intervals

Citer dette

Marras, Connie ; Hincapié, Cesar A ; Kristman, Vicki L ; Cancelliere, Carol ; Soklaridis, Sophie ; Li, Alvin ; Borg, Jörgen ; af Geijerstam, Jean-Luc ; Cassidy, John David. / Systematic review of the risk of Parkinson's disease after mild traumatic brain injury : results of the International Collaboration on Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Prognosis. I: Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. 2014 ; Bind 95, Nr. 3 Suppl. s. S238-44.
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Systematic review of the risk of Parkinson's disease after mild traumatic brain injury : results of the International Collaboration on Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Prognosis. / Marras, Connie; Hincapié, Cesar A; Kristman, Vicki L; Cancelliere, Carol; Soklaridis, Sophie; Li, Alvin; Borg, Jörgen; af Geijerstam, Jean-Luc; Cassidy, John David.

I: Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Bind 95, Nr. 3 Suppl, 03.2014, s. S238-44.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Systematic review of the risk of Parkinson's disease after mild traumatic brain injury

T2 - results of the International Collaboration on Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Prognosis

AU - Marras, Connie

AU - Hincapié, Cesar A

AU - Kristman, Vicki L

AU - Cancelliere, Carol

AU - Soklaridis, Sophie

AU - Li, Alvin

AU - Borg, Jörgen

AU - af Geijerstam, Jean-Luc

AU - Cassidy, John David

N1 - Copyright © 2014 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

PY - 2014/3

Y1 - 2014/3

N2 - OBJECTIVE: To synthesize the best available evidence on the risk of Parkinson's disease (PD) after mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI).DATA SOURCES: MEDLINE and other databases were searched (1990-2012) with terms including "craniocerebral trauma" and "parkinsonian disorders." Reference lists of eligible articles and relevant systematic reviews and meta-analyses were also searched.STUDY SELECTION: Controlled clinical trials, cohort studies, and case-control studies were selected according to predefined criteria. Studies had to have a minimum of 30 concussion cases.DATA EXTRACTION: Eligible studies were critically appraised using a modification of the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network criteria. Two reviewers independently reviewed and extracted data from accepted studies into evidence tables.DATA SYNTHESIS: Evidence was synthesized qualitatively according to modified Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network criteria. Sixty-five studies were eligible and reviewed, and 5 of these with a low risk of bias were accepted as scientifically admissible and form the basis of our findings. Among these admissible studies, the definitions of MTBI were highly heterogeneous. One study found a significant positive association between MTBI and PD (odds ratio, 1.5; 95% confidence interval, 1.4-1.7). The estimated odds ratio decreased with increasing latency between MTBI and PD diagnosis, which suggests reverse causality. The other 4 studies did not find a significant association.CONCLUSIONS: The best available evidence argues against an important causal association between MTBI and PD. There are few high-quality studies on this topic. Prospective studies of long duration would address the limitations of recall of head injury and the possibility of reverse causation.

AB - OBJECTIVE: To synthesize the best available evidence on the risk of Parkinson's disease (PD) after mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI).DATA SOURCES: MEDLINE and other databases were searched (1990-2012) with terms including "craniocerebral trauma" and "parkinsonian disorders." Reference lists of eligible articles and relevant systematic reviews and meta-analyses were also searched.STUDY SELECTION: Controlled clinical trials, cohort studies, and case-control studies were selected according to predefined criteria. Studies had to have a minimum of 30 concussion cases.DATA EXTRACTION: Eligible studies were critically appraised using a modification of the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network criteria. Two reviewers independently reviewed and extracted data from accepted studies into evidence tables.DATA SYNTHESIS: Evidence was synthesized qualitatively according to modified Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network criteria. Sixty-five studies were eligible and reviewed, and 5 of these with a low risk of bias were accepted as scientifically admissible and form the basis of our findings. Among these admissible studies, the definitions of MTBI were highly heterogeneous. One study found a significant positive association between MTBI and PD (odds ratio, 1.5; 95% confidence interval, 1.4-1.7). The estimated odds ratio decreased with increasing latency between MTBI and PD diagnosis, which suggests reverse causality. The other 4 studies did not find a significant association.CONCLUSIONS: The best available evidence argues against an important causal association between MTBI and PD. There are few high-quality studies on this topic. Prospective studies of long duration would address the limitations of recall of head injury and the possibility of reverse causation.

KW - Age Factors

KW - Brain Injuries

KW - Humans

KW - Parkinson Disease

KW - Prognosis

KW - Risk Factors

KW - Time Factors

KW - Trauma Severity Indices

U2 - 10.1016/j.apmr.2013.08.298

DO - 10.1016/j.apmr.2013.08.298

M3 - Journal article

VL - 95

SP - S238-44

JO - Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation

JF - Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation

SN - 0003-9993

IS - 3 Suppl

ER -