Resumé

Introduction
Poor postural control measured as sway performance is an intrinsic risk of injury and re-injury among adults. This has not been investigated in children.
Objective
To investigate the associations between balance, measured as sway performance, and the risk of both acute and overuse injuries in a population of children. Hypothesis: Excessive sway increases the risk of injury.
Design
The current study is part of The Childhood Health, Activity and Motor Performance School Study-Denmark (CHAMPS Study-DK II), a natural experiment with a prospective, quasi-experimental study design. The follow-up period between baseline measures of sway and registration of injuries was 1 year and 3 months.
Setting
10 public schools participated in the study, in the municipality of Svendborg.
Participants
1096 participants, 48.7% male, aged 8-14, mean age 11.2.
Assessments of risk factors
The independent variable in the current study is balance measured as sway. Sway was measured on a force platform as centre of pressure path length excursion during four tests: Eyes open: Bilateral stance (test 1), unilateral stance on dominant (test 2) and non-dominant leg (test 3). Eyes closed: Bilateral stance (test 4).
Outcome measures
Primary outcome was overuse and traumatic injuries, with special emphasis on ankle and knee sprains. Complaints were registered by SMS-track on a weekly basis, and after a telephone interview, clinicians examined and diagnosed the children with complaints. Injuries were diagnosed using ICD-10.
Results
Injuries: 2276, traumatic injuries: 714, ankle sprains: 164, knee sprains: 42
Preliminary multivariate analysis taking into account competing risk showed significant odds ratios (OR) at test 1; A) 1.003 per cm increase of sway; B) overall traumatic injury OR=3.0, ankle sprain OR=5.5 for sway longer than 400cm/minute.
Conclusion
Children with an excessive sway has an increased risk of traumatic injuries, this warrants further research into treating reduced balance in children.
OriginalsprogEngelsk
Publikationsdato2014
StatusUdgivet - 2014
BegivenhedIOC WORLD CONFERENCE ON PREVENTION OF INJURY AND ILLNESS IN SPORT: IOC WORLD CONFERENCE ON PREVENTION OF INJURY AND ILLNESS IN SPORT - Grimaldi Forum, Moncao, Monaco
Varighed: 10. apr. 201412. apr. 2014

Konference

KonferenceIOC WORLD CONFERENCE ON PREVENTION OF INJURY AND ILLNESS IN SPORT
LokationGrimaldi Forum
LandMonaco
ByMoncao
Periode10/04/201412/04/2014

Citer dette

Runge, L., Kristensen, P. L., Junge, T., Juul-Kristensen, B., & Wedderkopp, N. (2014). Sway as predictor of injuries in children. Poster session præsenteret på IOC WORLD CONFERENCE ON PREVENTION OF INJURY AND ILLNESS IN SPORT, Moncao, Monaco.
Runge, Lisbeth ; Kristensen, Peter Lund ; Junge, Tina ; Juul-Kristensen, Birgit ; Wedderkopp, Niels. / Sway as predictor of injuries in children. Poster session præsenteret på IOC WORLD CONFERENCE ON PREVENTION OF INJURY AND ILLNESS IN SPORT, Moncao, Monaco.
@conference{1913b7972d7c4c239675e2e2933205c5,
title = "Sway as predictor of injuries in children",
abstract = "Introduction Poor postural control measured as sway performance is an intrinsic risk of injury and re-injury among adults. This has not been investigated in children.Objective To investigate the associations between balance, measured as sway performance, and the risk of both acute and overuse injuries in a population of children. Hypothesis: Excessive sway increases the risk of injury.DesignThe current study is part of The Childhood Health, Activity and Motor Performance School Study-Denmark (CHAMPS Study-DK II), a natural experiment with a prospective, quasi-experimental study design. The follow-up period between baseline measures of sway and registration of injuries was 1 year and 3 months.Setting10 public schools participated in the study, in the municipality of Svendborg.Participants1096 participants, 48.7{\%} male, aged 8-14, mean age 11.2.Assessments of risk factorsThe independent variable in the current study is balance measured as sway. Sway was measured on a force platform as centre of pressure path length excursion during four tests: Eyes open: Bilateral stance (test 1), unilateral stance on dominant (test 2) and non-dominant leg (test 3). Eyes closed: Bilateral stance (test 4).Outcome measuresPrimary outcome was overuse and traumatic injuries, with special emphasis on ankle and knee sprains. Complaints were registered by SMS-track on a weekly basis, and after a telephone interview, clinicians examined and diagnosed the children with complaints. Injuries were diagnosed using ICD-10.ResultsInjuries: 2276, traumatic injuries: 714, ankle sprains: 164, knee sprains: 42Preliminary multivariate analysis taking into account competing risk showed significant odds ratios (OR) at test 1; A) 1.003 per cm increase of sway; B) overall traumatic injury OR=3.0, ankle sprain OR=5.5 for sway longer than 400cm/minute. ConclusionChildren with an excessive sway has an increased risk of traumatic injuries, this warrants further research into treating reduced balance in children.",
author = "Lisbeth Runge and Kristensen, {Peter Lund} and Tina Junge and Birgit Juul-Kristensen and Niels Wedderkopp",
year = "2014",
language = "English",
note = "null ; Conference date: 10-04-2014 Through 12-04-2014",

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Runge, L, Kristensen, PL, Junge, T, Juul-Kristensen, B & Wedderkopp, N 2014, 'Sway as predictor of injuries in children' IOC WORLD CONFERENCE ON PREVENTION OF INJURY AND ILLNESS IN SPORT, Moncao, Monaco, 10/04/2014 - 12/04/2014, .

Sway as predictor of injuries in children. / Runge, Lisbeth ; Kristensen, Peter Lund; Junge, Tina; Juul-Kristensen, Birgit; Wedderkopp, Niels.

2014. Poster session præsenteret på IOC WORLD CONFERENCE ON PREVENTION OF INJURY AND ILLNESS IN SPORT, Moncao, Monaco.

Publikation: Konferencebidrag uden forlag/tidsskriftPosterForskning

TY - CONF

T1 - Sway as predictor of injuries in children

AU - Runge, Lisbeth

AU - Kristensen, Peter Lund

AU - Junge, Tina

AU - Juul-Kristensen, Birgit

AU - Wedderkopp, Niels

PY - 2014

Y1 - 2014

N2 - Introduction Poor postural control measured as sway performance is an intrinsic risk of injury and re-injury among adults. This has not been investigated in children.Objective To investigate the associations between balance, measured as sway performance, and the risk of both acute and overuse injuries in a population of children. Hypothesis: Excessive sway increases the risk of injury.DesignThe current study is part of The Childhood Health, Activity and Motor Performance School Study-Denmark (CHAMPS Study-DK II), a natural experiment with a prospective, quasi-experimental study design. The follow-up period between baseline measures of sway and registration of injuries was 1 year and 3 months.Setting10 public schools participated in the study, in the municipality of Svendborg.Participants1096 participants, 48.7% male, aged 8-14, mean age 11.2.Assessments of risk factorsThe independent variable in the current study is balance measured as sway. Sway was measured on a force platform as centre of pressure path length excursion during four tests: Eyes open: Bilateral stance (test 1), unilateral stance on dominant (test 2) and non-dominant leg (test 3). Eyes closed: Bilateral stance (test 4).Outcome measuresPrimary outcome was overuse and traumatic injuries, with special emphasis on ankle and knee sprains. Complaints were registered by SMS-track on a weekly basis, and after a telephone interview, clinicians examined and diagnosed the children with complaints. Injuries were diagnosed using ICD-10.ResultsInjuries: 2276, traumatic injuries: 714, ankle sprains: 164, knee sprains: 42Preliminary multivariate analysis taking into account competing risk showed significant odds ratios (OR) at test 1; A) 1.003 per cm increase of sway; B) overall traumatic injury OR=3.0, ankle sprain OR=5.5 for sway longer than 400cm/minute. ConclusionChildren with an excessive sway has an increased risk of traumatic injuries, this warrants further research into treating reduced balance in children.

AB - Introduction Poor postural control measured as sway performance is an intrinsic risk of injury and re-injury among adults. This has not been investigated in children.Objective To investigate the associations between balance, measured as sway performance, and the risk of both acute and overuse injuries in a population of children. Hypothesis: Excessive sway increases the risk of injury.DesignThe current study is part of The Childhood Health, Activity and Motor Performance School Study-Denmark (CHAMPS Study-DK II), a natural experiment with a prospective, quasi-experimental study design. The follow-up period between baseline measures of sway and registration of injuries was 1 year and 3 months.Setting10 public schools participated in the study, in the municipality of Svendborg.Participants1096 participants, 48.7% male, aged 8-14, mean age 11.2.Assessments of risk factorsThe independent variable in the current study is balance measured as sway. Sway was measured on a force platform as centre of pressure path length excursion during four tests: Eyes open: Bilateral stance (test 1), unilateral stance on dominant (test 2) and non-dominant leg (test 3). Eyes closed: Bilateral stance (test 4).Outcome measuresPrimary outcome was overuse and traumatic injuries, with special emphasis on ankle and knee sprains. Complaints were registered by SMS-track on a weekly basis, and after a telephone interview, clinicians examined and diagnosed the children with complaints. Injuries were diagnosed using ICD-10.ResultsInjuries: 2276, traumatic injuries: 714, ankle sprains: 164, knee sprains: 42Preliminary multivariate analysis taking into account competing risk showed significant odds ratios (OR) at test 1; A) 1.003 per cm increase of sway; B) overall traumatic injury OR=3.0, ankle sprain OR=5.5 for sway longer than 400cm/minute. ConclusionChildren with an excessive sway has an increased risk of traumatic injuries, this warrants further research into treating reduced balance in children.

M3 - Poster

ER -

Runge L, Kristensen PL, Junge T, Juul-Kristensen B, Wedderkopp N. Sway as predictor of injuries in children. 2014. Poster session præsenteret på IOC WORLD CONFERENCE ON PREVENTION OF INJURY AND ILLNESS IN SPORT, Moncao, Monaco.