Support your local species: The potential of zoos in the protection of Europe's threatened species

Publikation: Konferencebidrag uden forlag/tidsskriftPosterForskning

Resumé

Nearly a quarter of all animal species within the European Union are threatened with extinction. Protecting many of these species will require the full spectrum of conservation actions from in-situ to ex-situ management.
Holding an estimated 44% of EU Red Listed terrestrial vertebrates, zoos hereby play an important role in protecting local species. However, outcomes of conservation actions are often highly uncertain and if European zoos want to support the conservation of threatened species, they are faced with the question of which species to target first and which conservation strategy to choose. Current decision-making in resource allocation and conservation planning is often, as in many other disciplines, based on little scientific ground. Here, we propose a Decision Analysis framework to support the Ex-situ guidelines of the Species Survival Commission of the IUCN. In which we assessed the Net-Cost-effectiveness of the following conservation actions: protecting a species habitat, the establishment of a Conservation Breeding Program, or doing both, for each of a total of 735 EU-species. We ranked those to prioritize which species to target first. This decision framework can be a fist step for the development of tools to support zoo collection planning and existing European conservation programs.
OriginalsprogEngelsk
Publikationsdato2015
StatusUdgivet - 2015
Begivenhed27th International Congress for Conservation Biology/4th European Congress for Conservation Biology: Mission Biodiversity: Choosing New Paths for Conservation - Montpellier, Frankrig
Varighed: 2. aug. 20156. aug. 2015
Konferencens nummer: 27

Konference

Konference27th International Congress for Conservation Biology/4th European Congress for Conservation Biology
Nummer27
LandFrankrig
ByMontpellier
Periode02/08/201506/08/2015

Fingeraftryk

zoo
decision analysis
conservation planning
resource allocation
Europe
European Union
vertebrate
extinction
breeding
decision making
habitat
cost

Citer dette

Stärk, J. (2015). Support your local species: The potential of zoos in the protection of Europe's threatened species. Poster session præsenteret på 27th International Congress for Conservation Biology/4th European Congress for Conservation Biology, Montpellier, Frankrig.
Stärk, Johanna. / Support your local species : The potential of zoos in the protection of Europe's threatened species. Poster session præsenteret på 27th International Congress for Conservation Biology/4th European Congress for Conservation Biology, Montpellier, Frankrig.
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title = "Support your local species: The potential of zoos in the protection of Europe's threatened species",
abstract = "Nearly a quarter of all animal species within the European Union are threatened with extinction. Protecting many of these species will require the full spectrum of conservation actions from in-situ to ex-situ management.Holding an estimated 44{\%} of EU Red Listed terrestrial vertebrates, zoos hereby play an important role in protecting local species. However, outcomes of conservation actions are often highly uncertain and if European zoos want to support the conservation of threatened species, they are faced with the question of which species to target first and which conservation strategy to choose. Current decision-making in resource allocation and conservation planning is often, as in many other disciplines, based on little scientific ground. Here, we propose a Decision Analysis framework to support the Ex-situ guidelines of the Species Survival Commission of the IUCN. In which we assessed the Net-Cost-effectiveness of the following conservation actions: protecting a species habitat, the establishment of a Conservation Breeding Program, or doing both, for each of a total of 735 EU-species. We ranked those to prioritize which species to target first. This decision framework can be a fist step for the development of tools to support zoo collection planning and existing European conservation programs.",
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note = "27th International Congress for Conservation Biology/4th European Congress for Conservation Biology : Mission Biodiversity: Choosing New Paths for Conservation, ICCB-ECCB ; Conference date: 02-08-2015 Through 06-08-2015",

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Stärk, J 2015, 'Support your local species: The potential of zoos in the protection of Europe's threatened species', 27th International Congress for Conservation Biology/4th European Congress for Conservation Biology, Montpellier, Frankrig, 02/08/2015 - 06/08/2015.

Support your local species : The potential of zoos in the protection of Europe's threatened species. / Stärk, Johanna.

2015. Poster session præsenteret på 27th International Congress for Conservation Biology/4th European Congress for Conservation Biology, Montpellier, Frankrig.

Publikation: Konferencebidrag uden forlag/tidsskriftPosterForskning

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T1 - Support your local species

T2 - The potential of zoos in the protection of Europe's threatened species

AU - Stärk, Johanna

PY - 2015

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N2 - Nearly a quarter of all animal species within the European Union are threatened with extinction. Protecting many of these species will require the full spectrum of conservation actions from in-situ to ex-situ management.Holding an estimated 44% of EU Red Listed terrestrial vertebrates, zoos hereby play an important role in protecting local species. However, outcomes of conservation actions are often highly uncertain and if European zoos want to support the conservation of threatened species, they are faced with the question of which species to target first and which conservation strategy to choose. Current decision-making in resource allocation and conservation planning is often, as in many other disciplines, based on little scientific ground. Here, we propose a Decision Analysis framework to support the Ex-situ guidelines of the Species Survival Commission of the IUCN. In which we assessed the Net-Cost-effectiveness of the following conservation actions: protecting a species habitat, the establishment of a Conservation Breeding Program, or doing both, for each of a total of 735 EU-species. We ranked those to prioritize which species to target first. This decision framework can be a fist step for the development of tools to support zoo collection planning and existing European conservation programs.

AB - Nearly a quarter of all animal species within the European Union are threatened with extinction. Protecting many of these species will require the full spectrum of conservation actions from in-situ to ex-situ management.Holding an estimated 44% of EU Red Listed terrestrial vertebrates, zoos hereby play an important role in protecting local species. However, outcomes of conservation actions are often highly uncertain and if European zoos want to support the conservation of threatened species, they are faced with the question of which species to target first and which conservation strategy to choose. Current decision-making in resource allocation and conservation planning is often, as in many other disciplines, based on little scientific ground. Here, we propose a Decision Analysis framework to support the Ex-situ guidelines of the Species Survival Commission of the IUCN. In which we assessed the Net-Cost-effectiveness of the following conservation actions: protecting a species habitat, the establishment of a Conservation Breeding Program, or doing both, for each of a total of 735 EU-species. We ranked those to prioritize which species to target first. This decision framework can be a fist step for the development of tools to support zoo collection planning and existing European conservation programs.

M3 - Poster

ER -

Stärk J. Support your local species: The potential of zoos in the protection of Europe's threatened species. 2015. Poster session præsenteret på 27th International Congress for Conservation Biology/4th European Congress for Conservation Biology, Montpellier, Frankrig.