Study protocol for a randomised trial evaluating the effect of a “birth environment room” versus a standard labour room on birth outcomes and the birth experience

Iben Lorentzen*, Charlotte Sander Andersen, Henriette Svenstrup Jensen, Ann Fogsgaard, Maralyn Foureur, Finn Friis Lauszus, Ellen Aagaard Nohr

*Kontaktforfatter for dette arbejde

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelFormidling

127 Downloads (Pure)

Resumé

Introduction: In the last decade, there has been an increased interest in exploring the impact of the physical birth environment on birth outcomes. The birth environment might have an important role in facilitating the production of the hormone oxytocin that causes contractions during labour. Oxytocin is released in a safe, secure and confidence-inducing environment, and environments focused on technology and medical interventions to achieve birth may disrupt the production of oxytocin and slow down the progress of labour. An experimental “birth environment room” was designed, inspired by knowledge from evidence-based healthcare design, which advocates bringing nature into the room to reduce stress. The purpose is to examine whether the ‘birth environment room’, with its design and decor to minimise stress, has an impact on birth outcomes and the birth experience of the woman and her partner. Materials and methods: A randomised controlled trial will recruit 680 nulliparous women at term who will be randomly allocated to either the “birth environment room” or a standard room. The study will take place at the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at Herning Hospital, with recruitment from May 2015. Randomisation to either the “birth environment room” or standard room takes place just before admission to a birth room during labour. The primary outcome is augmentation of labour, and the study has 80% power to detect a 10% difference between the two groups (two-sided α = 0.05). Secondary outcomes are duration of labour, use of pharmacological pain relief, mode of birth, and rating of the birth experience by women and their partners. Trial registration: NCT02478385(10/08/2016).

OriginalsprogEngelsk
Artikelnummer100336
TidsskriftContemporary Clinical Trials Communications
Vol/bind14
Antal sider7
ISSN2451-8654
DOI
StatusUdgivet - jun. 2019

Fingeraftryk

Oxytocin
Hospital Obstetrics and Gynecology Department
Evidence-Based Practice
Random Allocation
Gynecology
Randomized Controlled Trials
Hormones

Citer dette

Lorentzen, Iben ; Andersen, Charlotte Sander ; Jensen, Henriette Svenstrup ; Fogsgaard, Ann ; Foureur, Maralyn ; Lauszus, Finn Friis ; Nohr, Ellen Aagaard. / Study protocol for a randomised trial evaluating the effect of a “birth environment room” versus a standard labour room on birth outcomes and the birth experience. I: Contemporary Clinical Trials Communications. 2019 ; Bind 14.
@article{442461bba64d4e97b5319423abfed4b5,
title = "Study protocol for a randomised trial evaluating the effect of a “birth environment room” versus a standard labour room on birth outcomes and the birth experience",
abstract = "Introduction: In the last decade, there has been an increased interest in exploring the impact of the physical birth environment on birth outcomes. The birth environment might have an important role in facilitating the production of the hormone oxytocin that causes contractions during labour. Oxytocin is released in a safe, secure and confidence-inducing environment, and environments focused on technology and medical interventions to achieve birth may disrupt the production of oxytocin and slow down the progress of labour. An experimental “birth environment room” was designed, inspired by knowledge from evidence-based healthcare design, which advocates bringing nature into the room to reduce stress. The purpose is to examine whether the ‘birth environment room’, with its design and decor to minimise stress, has an impact on birth outcomes and the birth experience of the woman and her partner. Materials and methods: A randomised controlled trial will recruit 680 nulliparous women at term who will be randomly allocated to either the “birth environment room” or a standard room. The study will take place at the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at Herning Hospital, with recruitment from May 2015. Randomisation to either the “birth environment room” or standard room takes place just before admission to a birth room during labour. The primary outcome is augmentation of labour, and the study has 80{\%} power to detect a 10{\%} difference between the two groups (two-sided α = 0.05). Secondary outcomes are duration of labour, use of pharmacological pain relief, mode of birth, and rating of the birth experience by women and their partners. Trial registration: NCT02478385(10/08/2016).",
author = "Iben Lorentzen and Andersen, {Charlotte Sander} and Jensen, {Henriette Svenstrup} and Ann Fogsgaard and Maralyn Foureur and Lauszus, {Finn Friis} and Nohr, {Ellen Aagaard}",
year = "2019",
month = "6",
doi = "10.1016/j.conctc.2019.100336",
language = "English",
volume = "14",
journal = "Contemporary Clinical Trials Communications",
issn = "2451-8654",
publisher = "Elsevier",

}

Study protocol for a randomised trial evaluating the effect of a “birth environment room” versus a standard labour room on birth outcomes and the birth experience. / Lorentzen, Iben; Andersen, Charlotte Sander; Jensen, Henriette Svenstrup; Fogsgaard, Ann; Foureur, Maralyn; Lauszus, Finn Friis; Nohr, Ellen Aagaard.

I: Contemporary Clinical Trials Communications, Bind 14, 100336, 06.2019.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelFormidling

TY - JOUR

T1 - Study protocol for a randomised trial evaluating the effect of a “birth environment room” versus a standard labour room on birth outcomes and the birth experience

AU - Lorentzen, Iben

AU - Andersen, Charlotte Sander

AU - Jensen, Henriette Svenstrup

AU - Fogsgaard, Ann

AU - Foureur, Maralyn

AU - Lauszus, Finn Friis

AU - Nohr, Ellen Aagaard

PY - 2019/6

Y1 - 2019/6

N2 - Introduction: In the last decade, there has been an increased interest in exploring the impact of the physical birth environment on birth outcomes. The birth environment might have an important role in facilitating the production of the hormone oxytocin that causes contractions during labour. Oxytocin is released in a safe, secure and confidence-inducing environment, and environments focused on technology and medical interventions to achieve birth may disrupt the production of oxytocin and slow down the progress of labour. An experimental “birth environment room” was designed, inspired by knowledge from evidence-based healthcare design, which advocates bringing nature into the room to reduce stress. The purpose is to examine whether the ‘birth environment room’, with its design and decor to minimise stress, has an impact on birth outcomes and the birth experience of the woman and her partner. Materials and methods: A randomised controlled trial will recruit 680 nulliparous women at term who will be randomly allocated to either the “birth environment room” or a standard room. The study will take place at the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at Herning Hospital, with recruitment from May 2015. Randomisation to either the “birth environment room” or standard room takes place just before admission to a birth room during labour. The primary outcome is augmentation of labour, and the study has 80% power to detect a 10% difference between the two groups (two-sided α = 0.05). Secondary outcomes are duration of labour, use of pharmacological pain relief, mode of birth, and rating of the birth experience by women and their partners. Trial registration: NCT02478385(10/08/2016).

AB - Introduction: In the last decade, there has been an increased interest in exploring the impact of the physical birth environment on birth outcomes. The birth environment might have an important role in facilitating the production of the hormone oxytocin that causes contractions during labour. Oxytocin is released in a safe, secure and confidence-inducing environment, and environments focused on technology and medical interventions to achieve birth may disrupt the production of oxytocin and slow down the progress of labour. An experimental “birth environment room” was designed, inspired by knowledge from evidence-based healthcare design, which advocates bringing nature into the room to reduce stress. The purpose is to examine whether the ‘birth environment room’, with its design and decor to minimise stress, has an impact on birth outcomes and the birth experience of the woman and her partner. Materials and methods: A randomised controlled trial will recruit 680 nulliparous women at term who will be randomly allocated to either the “birth environment room” or a standard room. The study will take place at the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at Herning Hospital, with recruitment from May 2015. Randomisation to either the “birth environment room” or standard room takes place just before admission to a birth room during labour. The primary outcome is augmentation of labour, and the study has 80% power to detect a 10% difference between the two groups (two-sided α = 0.05). Secondary outcomes are duration of labour, use of pharmacological pain relief, mode of birth, and rating of the birth experience by women and their partners. Trial registration: NCT02478385(10/08/2016).

U2 - 10.1016/j.conctc.2019.100336

DO - 10.1016/j.conctc.2019.100336

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 30886935

AN - SCOPUS:85062148298

VL - 14

JO - Contemporary Clinical Trials Communications

JF - Contemporary Clinical Trials Communications

SN - 2451-8654

M1 - 100336

ER -