Study of Shear Force Technique for Near-Field Microscopy with an Uncoated Fiber Tip

Brian Vohnsen, Sergei I. Bozhevolnyi, R. Olesen

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

The shear force technique, which is based on the detection of intensity variations in the diffracted light from a laser beam incident on the resonantly vibrating fiber tip, is considered. Two simple mechanical models are used for estimating the magnitude of the forces involved in the tip-surface interaction. A theoretical model describing the optical detection part of the shear force technique is developed for uncoated fiber tips. It is shown that when using an optimum configuration of the detection system, a tip vibration amplitude of 1 nm can result in up to 50 nW of the detected optical signal for the laser beam power of 5 mW. The calculated results are compared with experimental data.
OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftUltramicroscopy
Vol/bind61
Udgave nummer1-4
Sider (fra-til)207-213
ISSN0304-3991
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 1995
Udgivet eksterntJa

Fingeraftryk

Laser beams
near fields
Microscopic examination
shear
microscopy
fibers
Fibers
laser beams
surface reactions
optical communication
estimating
vibration
configurations

Citer dette

@article{7fdaea50443d11dd9fbe000ea68e967b,
title = "Study of Shear Force Technique for Near-Field Microscopy with an Uncoated Fiber Tip",
abstract = "The shear force technique, which is based on the detection of intensity variations in the diffracted light from a laser beam incident on the resonantly vibrating fiber tip, is considered. Two simple mechanical models are used for estimating the magnitude of the forces involved in the tip-surface interaction. A theoretical model describing the optical detection part of the shear force technique is developed for uncoated fiber tips. It is shown that when using an optimum configuration of the detection system, a tip vibration amplitude of 1 nm can result in up to 50 nW of the detected optical signal for the laser beam power of 5 mW. The calculated results are compared with experimental data.",
author = "Brian Vohnsen and Bozhevolnyi, {Sergei I.} and R. Olesen",
year = "1995",
doi = "10.1016/0304-3991(95)00116-6",
language = "English",
volume = "61",
pages = "207--213",
journal = "Ultramicroscopy",
issn = "0304-3991",
publisher = "Elsevier",
number = "1-4",

}

Study of Shear Force Technique for Near-Field Microscopy with an Uncoated Fiber Tip. / Vohnsen, Brian; Bozhevolnyi, Sergei I.; Olesen, R.

I: Ultramicroscopy, Bind 61, Nr. 1-4, 1995, s. 207-213.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Study of Shear Force Technique for Near-Field Microscopy with an Uncoated Fiber Tip

AU - Vohnsen, Brian

AU - Bozhevolnyi, Sergei I.

AU - Olesen, R.

PY - 1995

Y1 - 1995

N2 - The shear force technique, which is based on the detection of intensity variations in the diffracted light from a laser beam incident on the resonantly vibrating fiber tip, is considered. Two simple mechanical models are used for estimating the magnitude of the forces involved in the tip-surface interaction. A theoretical model describing the optical detection part of the shear force technique is developed for uncoated fiber tips. It is shown that when using an optimum configuration of the detection system, a tip vibration amplitude of 1 nm can result in up to 50 nW of the detected optical signal for the laser beam power of 5 mW. The calculated results are compared with experimental data.

AB - The shear force technique, which is based on the detection of intensity variations in the diffracted light from a laser beam incident on the resonantly vibrating fiber tip, is considered. Two simple mechanical models are used for estimating the magnitude of the forces involved in the tip-surface interaction. A theoretical model describing the optical detection part of the shear force technique is developed for uncoated fiber tips. It is shown that when using an optimum configuration of the detection system, a tip vibration amplitude of 1 nm can result in up to 50 nW of the detected optical signal for the laser beam power of 5 mW. The calculated results are compared with experimental data.

U2 - 10.1016/0304-3991(95)00116-6

DO - 10.1016/0304-3991(95)00116-6

M3 - Journal article

VL - 61

SP - 207

EP - 213

JO - Ultramicroscopy

JF - Ultramicroscopy

SN - 0304-3991

IS - 1-4

ER -