Studies of twins indicate that genetics influence dietary intake

Ann Louise Hasselbalch, Berit L Heitmann, Kirsten O Kyvik, Thorkil Sørensen

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

Udgivelsesdato: 2008-Dec
OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftJournal of Nutrition
Vol/bind138
Udgave nummer12
Sider (fra-til)2406-12
Antal sider6
ISSN0022-3166
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 1. dec. 2008

Fingeraftryk

Twin Studies
Food
Eggs
Fruit
Margarine
Dietary Fiber
Vegetables
Fishes
Cross-Sectional Studies

Citer dette

Hasselbalch, Ann Louise ; Heitmann, Berit L ; Kyvik, Kirsten O ; Sørensen, Thorkil. / Studies of twins indicate that genetics influence dietary intake. I: Journal of Nutrition. 2008 ; Bind 138, Nr. 12. s. 2406-12.
@article{fb83f8e0c11f11dda428000ea68e967b,
title = "Studies of twins indicate that genetics influence dietary intake",
abstract = "Habitual dietary intake is a complex behavior that may have both biological and nonbiological bases. We estimated the contribution of genetic and environmental influences on dietary intake in a large population-based sample of healthy twins. Data originated from a cross-sectional study of 600 male and female healthy twin pairs with self-reported food consumption frequency using a validated questionnaire with 247 foods and recipes. Estimates of relative proportion of additive genetic, nonadditive genetic, shared environmental, and unshared environmental effects on various aspects of dietary intake were obtained by quantitative genetic modeling of twin data based on linear structural equations. The analyses demonstrated genetic influence on total energy, macronutrient energy, and dietary fiber intakes, the glycemic index and the glycemic load of the foods consumed, and the dietary energy density, with significant heritability estimates ranging from 0.25 (0.11-0.38) to 0.47 (0.31-0.60) in men and 0.32 (0.12-0.48) to 0.49 (0.35-0.61) in women. When analyzing dietary intake as the intake of energy from 20 food groups, the genetic and environmental influences differed among food groups and between gender. For some food groups (fruit for both genders, poultry and eggs for men), no genetic influence was found, whereas nonadditive genetic effects were demonstrated for other food groups (juices and eggs for women). A number of food groups had shared environmental influences (potatoes, vegetables, fruits, poultry, fish, margarine, and candy). These results provide evidence for both genetic and shared environmental effects on dietary intake. Although the remaining nonshared environmental effects include measurement errors, there appears to be considerable potential for individually modifiable effects.",
author = "Hasselbalch, {Ann Louise} and Heitmann, {Berit L} and Kyvik, {Kirsten O} and Thorkil S{\o}rensen",
year = "2008",
month = "12",
day = "1",
doi = "10.3945/jn.108.087668",
language = "English",
volume = "138",
pages = "2406--12",
journal = "The Journal of Nutrition",
issn = "0022-3166",
publisher = "American Society for Nutrition",
number = "12",

}

Studies of twins indicate that genetics influence dietary intake. / Hasselbalch, Ann Louise; Heitmann, Berit L; Kyvik, Kirsten O; Sørensen, Thorkil.

I: Journal of Nutrition, Bind 138, Nr. 12, 01.12.2008, s. 2406-12.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Studies of twins indicate that genetics influence dietary intake

AU - Hasselbalch, Ann Louise

AU - Heitmann, Berit L

AU - Kyvik, Kirsten O

AU - Sørensen, Thorkil

PY - 2008/12/1

Y1 - 2008/12/1

N2 - Habitual dietary intake is a complex behavior that may have both biological and nonbiological bases. We estimated the contribution of genetic and environmental influences on dietary intake in a large population-based sample of healthy twins. Data originated from a cross-sectional study of 600 male and female healthy twin pairs with self-reported food consumption frequency using a validated questionnaire with 247 foods and recipes. Estimates of relative proportion of additive genetic, nonadditive genetic, shared environmental, and unshared environmental effects on various aspects of dietary intake were obtained by quantitative genetic modeling of twin data based on linear structural equations. The analyses demonstrated genetic influence on total energy, macronutrient energy, and dietary fiber intakes, the glycemic index and the glycemic load of the foods consumed, and the dietary energy density, with significant heritability estimates ranging from 0.25 (0.11-0.38) to 0.47 (0.31-0.60) in men and 0.32 (0.12-0.48) to 0.49 (0.35-0.61) in women. When analyzing dietary intake as the intake of energy from 20 food groups, the genetic and environmental influences differed among food groups and between gender. For some food groups (fruit for both genders, poultry and eggs for men), no genetic influence was found, whereas nonadditive genetic effects were demonstrated for other food groups (juices and eggs for women). A number of food groups had shared environmental influences (potatoes, vegetables, fruits, poultry, fish, margarine, and candy). These results provide evidence for both genetic and shared environmental effects on dietary intake. Although the remaining nonshared environmental effects include measurement errors, there appears to be considerable potential for individually modifiable effects.

AB - Habitual dietary intake is a complex behavior that may have both biological and nonbiological bases. We estimated the contribution of genetic and environmental influences on dietary intake in a large population-based sample of healthy twins. Data originated from a cross-sectional study of 600 male and female healthy twin pairs with self-reported food consumption frequency using a validated questionnaire with 247 foods and recipes. Estimates of relative proportion of additive genetic, nonadditive genetic, shared environmental, and unshared environmental effects on various aspects of dietary intake were obtained by quantitative genetic modeling of twin data based on linear structural equations. The analyses demonstrated genetic influence on total energy, macronutrient energy, and dietary fiber intakes, the glycemic index and the glycemic load of the foods consumed, and the dietary energy density, with significant heritability estimates ranging from 0.25 (0.11-0.38) to 0.47 (0.31-0.60) in men and 0.32 (0.12-0.48) to 0.49 (0.35-0.61) in women. When analyzing dietary intake as the intake of energy from 20 food groups, the genetic and environmental influences differed among food groups and between gender. For some food groups (fruit for both genders, poultry and eggs for men), no genetic influence was found, whereas nonadditive genetic effects were demonstrated for other food groups (juices and eggs for women). A number of food groups had shared environmental influences (potatoes, vegetables, fruits, poultry, fish, margarine, and candy). These results provide evidence for both genetic and shared environmental effects on dietary intake. Although the remaining nonshared environmental effects include measurement errors, there appears to be considerable potential for individually modifiable effects.

U2 - 10.3945/jn.108.087668

DO - 10.3945/jn.108.087668

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 19022965

VL - 138

SP - 2406

EP - 2412

JO - The Journal of Nutrition

JF - The Journal of Nutrition

SN - 0022-3166

IS - 12

ER -