Stone risk after bladder substitution with the ileal-urethral Kock reservoir

P J Osther, A L Poulsen, K Steven

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

Udgivelsesdato: 2000-Aug
OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftScandinavian Journal of Urology and Nephrology
Vol/bind34
Udgave nummer4
Sider (fra-til)257-61
Antal sider4
ISSN0036-5599
StatusUdgivet - 1. aug. 2000

Fingeraftryk

Urine
Urine Specimen Collection
Ammonia
Phosphorus
Magnesium
Creatinine
Ions
Kidney
Struvite

Citer dette

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title = "Stone risk after bladder substitution with the ileal-urethral Kock reservoir",
abstract = "OBJECTIVE: The study was carried out to compare urinary biochemical and physicochemical environments in patients who had undergone bladder substitution with the ileal-urethral Kock reservoir, and who had no actual urinary infection, with those of healthy subjects. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The participants were 23 male patients who had undergone bladder substitution with the ileal-urethral Kock reservoir and 25 healthy men. All subjects had sterile urine at the time of urine collection. Concentrations of calcium, magnesium, phosphorus, creatinine, citrate, oxalate, and ammonia in 24-h urine samples were measured. Estimates of ion activity products of calcium oxalate (CaOx), calcium phosphate (CaP), brushite (Bru), and magnesium ammonium phosphate (MAP) in urine were calculated according to Tiselius. RESULTS: There was no significant difference in 24-h urinary volume between patients with a bladder substitute and the healthy controls. For most of the other measured values the results for patients differed significantly from those for controls. The most striking findings were markedly lower urinary excretion rates of citrate (p < 0.0001) and higher urine pH (p < 0.0001) in patients compared with controls. These findings were reflected in significantly higher levels of urinary supersaturation with respect to CaOx (p < 0.0001), CaP (p <0.0001), Bru (p < 0.0001) and MAP (stuvite) (p < 0.0001) in patients with a bladder substitute compared with healthy subjects. CONCLUSIONS: Hypocitraturia seems to be the main risk factor for calcium stone formation in non-infected Kock reservoir patients, and citrate supplementation appears to be the most obvious choice for stone prophylaxis in patients with intestinal urinary diversion and recurrent renal stone formation.",
keywords = "Adult, Aged, Calcium, Case-Control Studies, Citric Acid, Humans, Hydrogen-Ion Concentration, Kidney Calculi, Male, Middle Aged, Risk Factors, Statistics, Nonparametric, Urinalysis, Urinary Reservoirs, Continent",
author = "Osther, {P J} and Poulsen, {A L} and K Steven",
year = "2000",
month = "8",
day = "1",
language = "English",
volume = "34",
pages = "257--61",
journal = "Scandinavian Journal of Urology and Nephrology",
issn = "0036-5599",
publisher = "Taylor & Francis",
number = "4",

}

Stone risk after bladder substitution with the ileal-urethral Kock reservoir. / Osther, P J; Poulsen, A L; Steven, K.

I: Scandinavian Journal of Urology and Nephrology, Bind 34, Nr. 4, 01.08.2000, s. 257-61.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Stone risk after bladder substitution with the ileal-urethral Kock reservoir

AU - Osther, P J

AU - Poulsen, A L

AU - Steven, K

PY - 2000/8/1

Y1 - 2000/8/1

N2 - OBJECTIVE: The study was carried out to compare urinary biochemical and physicochemical environments in patients who had undergone bladder substitution with the ileal-urethral Kock reservoir, and who had no actual urinary infection, with those of healthy subjects. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The participants were 23 male patients who had undergone bladder substitution with the ileal-urethral Kock reservoir and 25 healthy men. All subjects had sterile urine at the time of urine collection. Concentrations of calcium, magnesium, phosphorus, creatinine, citrate, oxalate, and ammonia in 24-h urine samples were measured. Estimates of ion activity products of calcium oxalate (CaOx), calcium phosphate (CaP), brushite (Bru), and magnesium ammonium phosphate (MAP) in urine were calculated according to Tiselius. RESULTS: There was no significant difference in 24-h urinary volume between patients with a bladder substitute and the healthy controls. For most of the other measured values the results for patients differed significantly from those for controls. The most striking findings were markedly lower urinary excretion rates of citrate (p < 0.0001) and higher urine pH (p < 0.0001) in patients compared with controls. These findings were reflected in significantly higher levels of urinary supersaturation with respect to CaOx (p < 0.0001), CaP (p <0.0001), Bru (p < 0.0001) and MAP (stuvite) (p < 0.0001) in patients with a bladder substitute compared with healthy subjects. CONCLUSIONS: Hypocitraturia seems to be the main risk factor for calcium stone formation in non-infected Kock reservoir patients, and citrate supplementation appears to be the most obvious choice for stone prophylaxis in patients with intestinal urinary diversion and recurrent renal stone formation.

AB - OBJECTIVE: The study was carried out to compare urinary biochemical and physicochemical environments in patients who had undergone bladder substitution with the ileal-urethral Kock reservoir, and who had no actual urinary infection, with those of healthy subjects. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The participants were 23 male patients who had undergone bladder substitution with the ileal-urethral Kock reservoir and 25 healthy men. All subjects had sterile urine at the time of urine collection. Concentrations of calcium, magnesium, phosphorus, creatinine, citrate, oxalate, and ammonia in 24-h urine samples were measured. Estimates of ion activity products of calcium oxalate (CaOx), calcium phosphate (CaP), brushite (Bru), and magnesium ammonium phosphate (MAP) in urine were calculated according to Tiselius. RESULTS: There was no significant difference in 24-h urinary volume between patients with a bladder substitute and the healthy controls. For most of the other measured values the results for patients differed significantly from those for controls. The most striking findings were markedly lower urinary excretion rates of citrate (p < 0.0001) and higher urine pH (p < 0.0001) in patients compared with controls. These findings were reflected in significantly higher levels of urinary supersaturation with respect to CaOx (p < 0.0001), CaP (p <0.0001), Bru (p < 0.0001) and MAP (stuvite) (p < 0.0001) in patients with a bladder substitute compared with healthy subjects. CONCLUSIONS: Hypocitraturia seems to be the main risk factor for calcium stone formation in non-infected Kock reservoir patients, and citrate supplementation appears to be the most obvious choice for stone prophylaxis in patients with intestinal urinary diversion and recurrent renal stone formation.

KW - Adult

KW - Aged

KW - Calcium

KW - Case-Control Studies

KW - Citric Acid

KW - Humans

KW - Hydrogen-Ion Concentration

KW - Kidney Calculi

KW - Male

KW - Middle Aged

KW - Risk Factors

KW - Statistics, Nonparametric

KW - Urinalysis

KW - Urinary Reservoirs, Continent

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 11095084

VL - 34

SP - 257

EP - 261

JO - Scandinavian Journal of Urology and Nephrology

JF - Scandinavian Journal of Urology and Nephrology

SN - 0036-5599

IS - 4

ER -