Social learning within and across species: information transfer in mouse-eared bats

T. M. A. Clarin, I. Borissov, R. A. Page, J. M. Ratcliffe, B. M. Siemers

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

Social learning describes information transfer between individuals through observation or direct interaction. Bats can live and forage in large groups, sometimes comprising several species, and are thus well suited for investigations of both intraspecific and interspecific information transfer. Although social learning has been documented within several bat species, it has not been shown to occur between species. Furthermore, it is not fully understood what level of interaction between individuals is necessary for social learning in bats. We address these questions by comparing the efficiency of observation versus interaction in intraspecific social learning and by considering interspecific social learning in sympatric bat species. Observers learned from demonstrators to identify food sources using a light cue. We show that intraspecific social learning exists in the greater mouse-eared bat (Myotis myotis (Borkhausen, 1797)) and that direct interaction with a demonstrator more efficiently leads to information transfer than observational learning alone. We also found evidence for interspecific information transfer from M. myotis to the lesser mouse-eared bat (Myotis oxygnathus Monticelli, 1885). Additionally, we opportunistically retested one individual that we recaptured from the wild 1 year after initial learning and found long-term memory of the trained association. Our study adds to the understanding of learning, information transfer, and long-term memory in wild-living animals.
OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftCanadian Journal of Zoology
Vol/bind92
Udgave nummer2
Sider (fra-til)129-139
ISSN0008-4301
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 2014

Bibliografisk note

ISI Document Delivery No.: AA4PE Times Cited: 4 Cited Reference Count: 59 Clarin, Theresa M. A. Borissov, Ivailo Page, Rachel A. Ratcliffe, John M. Siemers, Bjoern M. International Max Planck Research School (IMPRS) for Organismal Biology; Max Planck Institute for Ornithology We thank K. Koselj for considerable help with the statistical analysis of our data. M. Crawley also provided helpful advice, during his GLIM course at Imperial College London. We thank the participants of the scientific writing workshop held in Balmaha, Scotland, especially B. Helm, for constructive criticism of an earlier draft of the manuscript. We are grateful to two reviewers for their insightful comments on the manuscript. We thank K. Koselj and M. Clarin for the same, and the Tabachka Bat Research Station Team 2011 and 2012 for logistical support. We thank M. Clarin for help designing and constructing the feeding boxes. T. C. was supported by the International Max Planck Research School (IMPRS) for Organismal Biology and this research was funded by the Max Planck Institute for Ornithology. Our greatest thanks go to the late Bjorn Siemers, head of the Sensory Ecology Group in Seewiesen, Germany, for his support, friendship, and unending inspiration. 4 CANADIAN SCIENCE PUBLISHING, NRC RESEARCH PRESS OTTAWA CAN J ZOOL

Emneord

  • social learning information transfer long-term memory foraging interspecific learning Myotis myotis greater mouse-eared bat Myotis oxygnathus lesser mouse-eared bat FEMALE BECHSTEINS BATS SPEAR-NOSED BATS MYOTIS-MYOTIS PREDATOR RECOGNITION CULTURAL TRANSMISSION HABITAT SELECTION FEEDING-BEHAVIOR WILD POPULATION FIELD CRICKET BLYTHII

Citer dette

Clarin, T. M. A., Borissov, I., Page, R. A., Ratcliffe, J. M., & Siemers, B. M. (2014). Social learning within and across species: information transfer in mouse-eared bats. Canadian Journal of Zoology, 92(2), 129-139. https://doi.org/10.1139/cjz-2013-0211
Clarin, T. M. A. ; Borissov, I. ; Page, R. A. ; Ratcliffe, J. M. ; Siemers, B. M. / Social learning within and across species: information transfer in mouse-eared bats. I: Canadian Journal of Zoology. 2014 ; Bind 92, Nr. 2. s. 129-139.
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Clarin, TMA, Borissov, I, Page, RA, Ratcliffe, JM & Siemers, BM 2014, 'Social learning within and across species: information transfer in mouse-eared bats', Canadian Journal of Zoology, bind 92, nr. 2, s. 129-139. https://doi.org/10.1139/cjz-2013-0211

Social learning within and across species: information transfer in mouse-eared bats. / Clarin, T. M. A.; Borissov, I.; Page, R. A.; Ratcliffe, J. M.; Siemers, B. M.

I: Canadian Journal of Zoology, Bind 92, Nr. 2, 2014, s. 129-139.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Social learning within and across species: information transfer in mouse-eared bats

AU - Clarin, T. M. A.

AU - Borissov, I.

AU - Page, R. A.

AU - Ratcliffe, J. M.

AU - Siemers, B. M.

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PY - 2014

Y1 - 2014

N2 - Social learning describes information transfer between individuals through observation or direct interaction. Bats can live and forage in large groups, sometimes comprising several species, and are thus well suited for investigations of both intraspecific and interspecific information transfer. Although social learning has been documented within several bat species, it has not been shown to occur between species. Furthermore, it is not fully understood what level of interaction between individuals is necessary for social learning in bats. We address these questions by comparing the efficiency of observation versus interaction in intraspecific social learning and by considering interspecific social learning in sympatric bat species. Observers learned from demonstrators to identify food sources using a light cue. We show that intraspecific social learning exists in the greater mouse-eared bat (Myotis myotis (Borkhausen, 1797)) and that direct interaction with a demonstrator more efficiently leads to information transfer than observational learning alone. We also found evidence for interspecific information transfer from M. myotis to the lesser mouse-eared bat (Myotis oxygnathus Monticelli, 1885). Additionally, we opportunistically retested one individual that we recaptured from the wild 1 year after initial learning and found long-term memory of the trained association. Our study adds to the understanding of learning, information transfer, and long-term memory in wild-living animals.

AB - Social learning describes information transfer between individuals through observation or direct interaction. Bats can live and forage in large groups, sometimes comprising several species, and are thus well suited for investigations of both intraspecific and interspecific information transfer. Although social learning has been documented within several bat species, it has not been shown to occur between species. Furthermore, it is not fully understood what level of interaction between individuals is necessary for social learning in bats. We address these questions by comparing the efficiency of observation versus interaction in intraspecific social learning and by considering interspecific social learning in sympatric bat species. Observers learned from demonstrators to identify food sources using a light cue. We show that intraspecific social learning exists in the greater mouse-eared bat (Myotis myotis (Borkhausen, 1797)) and that direct interaction with a demonstrator more efficiently leads to information transfer than observational learning alone. We also found evidence for interspecific information transfer from M. myotis to the lesser mouse-eared bat (Myotis oxygnathus Monticelli, 1885). Additionally, we opportunistically retested one individual that we recaptured from the wild 1 year after initial learning and found long-term memory of the trained association. Our study adds to the understanding of learning, information transfer, and long-term memory in wild-living animals.

KW - social learning information transfer long-term memory foraging interspecific learning Myotis myotis greater mouse-eared bat Myotis oxygnathus lesser mouse-eared bat FEMALE BECHSTEINS BATS SPEAR-NOSED BATS MYOTIS-MYOTIS PREDATOR RECOGNITION CULTURAL TRANSM

U2 - 10.1139/cjz-2013-0211

DO - 10.1139/cjz-2013-0211

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VL - 92

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EP - 139

JO - Canadian Journal of Zoology

JF - Canadian Journal of Zoology

SN - 0008-4301

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