Smoking Cessation Intervention After Ischemic Stroke or Transient Ischemic Attack. A Randomized Controlled Pilot Trial

Nicole Brunner Frandsen, Margit Sørensen, Tanja Kirstine Hyldahl, Rikke Mitzi Henriksen, Søren Bak

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

BACKGROUND: Smoking cessation is widely recommended for secondary stroke prevention. However, little is known about the efficacy of smoking cessation intervention after stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA). METHODS: Ninety-four smokers under age 76, admitted with ischemic stroke or TIA were randomized to minimal smoking cessation intervention or intensive smoking cessation intervention. All patients attended a 30-min individual counseling by the study nurse. Patients randomized to intensive smoking cessation intervention also participated in a 5-session outpatient smoking cessation program by an authorized smoking cessation instructor, a 30-min outpatient visit after 6 weeks, and 5 telephone counseling sessions by the study nurse. Free samples of nicotine replacement therapy were offered as part of the intensive smoking cessation program. Smoking cessation rates at 6 months were determined by self-report and verified by measurement of exhaled carbon monoxide (CO). Fewer patients than expected were recruited, which renders this report a pilot study. RESULTS: The 6-month self-reported smoking cessation rate was 37.8% in the minimal intervention group and 42.9% in the intensive intervention group. Smoking cessation rates verified by exhaled CO levels in the minimal intervention group and the intensive intervention group were 28.9% and 32.7%, respectively. No difference was found between the two groups (χ(2) = 0.16, p = .69).Conclusions:Overall smoking cessation rates were moderate and comparable to the results from other studies. Intensive smoking cessation intervention was not superior to short smoking cessation intervention. Thus, other factors than intensity of smoking cessation intervention might influence the smoking cessation rates after stroke or TIA.
OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftNicotine & Tobacco Research
Vol/bind14
Udgave nummer4
Sider (fra-til)443-7
Antal sider5
ISSN1462-2203
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 2012

Fingeraftryk

Transient Ischemic Attack
Smoking Cessation
Randomized Controlled Trials
Counseling
Outpatients
Nurses
Nicotine
Self Report

Citer dette

Brunner Frandsen, Nicole ; Sørensen, Margit ; Hyldahl, Tanja Kirstine ; Henriksen, Rikke Mitzi ; Bak, Søren. / Smoking Cessation Intervention After Ischemic Stroke or Transient Ischemic Attack. A Randomized Controlled Pilot Trial. I: Nicotine & Tobacco Research. 2012 ; Bind 14, Nr. 4. s. 443-7.
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abstract = "BACKGROUND: Smoking cessation is widely recommended for secondary stroke prevention. However, little is known about the efficacy of smoking cessation intervention after stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA). METHODS: Ninety-four smokers under age 76, admitted with ischemic stroke or TIA were randomized to minimal smoking cessation intervention or intensive smoking cessation intervention. All patients attended a 30-min individual counseling by the study nurse. Patients randomized to intensive smoking cessation intervention also participated in a 5-session outpatient smoking cessation program by an authorized smoking cessation instructor, a 30-min outpatient visit after 6 weeks, and 5 telephone counseling sessions by the study nurse. Free samples of nicotine replacement therapy were offered as part of the intensive smoking cessation program. Smoking cessation rates at 6 months were determined by self-report and verified by measurement of exhaled carbon monoxide (CO). Fewer patients than expected were recruited, which renders this report a pilot study. RESULTS: The 6-month self-reported smoking cessation rate was 37.8{\%} in the minimal intervention group and 42.9{\%} in the intensive intervention group. Smoking cessation rates verified by exhaled CO levels in the minimal intervention group and the intensive intervention group were 28.9{\%} and 32.7{\%}, respectively. No difference was found between the two groups (χ(2) = 0.16, p = .69).Conclusions:Overall smoking cessation rates were moderate and comparable to the results from other studies. Intensive smoking cessation intervention was not superior to short smoking cessation intervention. Thus, other factors than intensity of smoking cessation intervention might influence the smoking cessation rates after stroke or TIA.",
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Smoking Cessation Intervention After Ischemic Stroke or Transient Ischemic Attack. A Randomized Controlled Pilot Trial. / Brunner Frandsen, Nicole; Sørensen, Margit; Hyldahl, Tanja Kirstine; Henriksen, Rikke Mitzi; Bak, Søren.

I: Nicotine & Tobacco Research, Bind 14, Nr. 4, 2012, s. 443-7.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Smoking Cessation Intervention After Ischemic Stroke or Transient Ischemic Attack. A Randomized Controlled Pilot Trial

AU - Brunner Frandsen, Nicole

AU - Sørensen, Margit

AU - Hyldahl, Tanja Kirstine

AU - Henriksen, Rikke Mitzi

AU - Bak, Søren

PY - 2012

Y1 - 2012

N2 - BACKGROUND: Smoking cessation is widely recommended for secondary stroke prevention. However, little is known about the efficacy of smoking cessation intervention after stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA). METHODS: Ninety-four smokers under age 76, admitted with ischemic stroke or TIA were randomized to minimal smoking cessation intervention or intensive smoking cessation intervention. All patients attended a 30-min individual counseling by the study nurse. Patients randomized to intensive smoking cessation intervention also participated in a 5-session outpatient smoking cessation program by an authorized smoking cessation instructor, a 30-min outpatient visit after 6 weeks, and 5 telephone counseling sessions by the study nurse. Free samples of nicotine replacement therapy were offered as part of the intensive smoking cessation program. Smoking cessation rates at 6 months were determined by self-report and verified by measurement of exhaled carbon monoxide (CO). Fewer patients than expected were recruited, which renders this report a pilot study. RESULTS: The 6-month self-reported smoking cessation rate was 37.8% in the minimal intervention group and 42.9% in the intensive intervention group. Smoking cessation rates verified by exhaled CO levels in the minimal intervention group and the intensive intervention group were 28.9% and 32.7%, respectively. No difference was found between the two groups (χ(2) = 0.16, p = .69).Conclusions:Overall smoking cessation rates were moderate and comparable to the results from other studies. Intensive smoking cessation intervention was not superior to short smoking cessation intervention. Thus, other factors than intensity of smoking cessation intervention might influence the smoking cessation rates after stroke or TIA.

AB - BACKGROUND: Smoking cessation is widely recommended for secondary stroke prevention. However, little is known about the efficacy of smoking cessation intervention after stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA). METHODS: Ninety-four smokers under age 76, admitted with ischemic stroke or TIA were randomized to minimal smoking cessation intervention or intensive smoking cessation intervention. All patients attended a 30-min individual counseling by the study nurse. Patients randomized to intensive smoking cessation intervention also participated in a 5-session outpatient smoking cessation program by an authorized smoking cessation instructor, a 30-min outpatient visit after 6 weeks, and 5 telephone counseling sessions by the study nurse. Free samples of nicotine replacement therapy were offered as part of the intensive smoking cessation program. Smoking cessation rates at 6 months were determined by self-report and verified by measurement of exhaled carbon monoxide (CO). Fewer patients than expected were recruited, which renders this report a pilot study. RESULTS: The 6-month self-reported smoking cessation rate was 37.8% in the minimal intervention group and 42.9% in the intensive intervention group. Smoking cessation rates verified by exhaled CO levels in the minimal intervention group and the intensive intervention group were 28.9% and 32.7%, respectively. No difference was found between the two groups (χ(2) = 0.16, p = .69).Conclusions:Overall smoking cessation rates were moderate and comparable to the results from other studies. Intensive smoking cessation intervention was not superior to short smoking cessation intervention. Thus, other factors than intensity of smoking cessation intervention might influence the smoking cessation rates after stroke or TIA.

U2 - 10.1093/ntr/ntr233

DO - 10.1093/ntr/ntr233

M3 - Journal article

VL - 14

SP - 443

EP - 447

JO - Nicotine & Tobacco Research

JF - Nicotine & Tobacco Research

SN - 1462-2203

IS - 4

ER -