Should We be More Worried When Our Fathers or Our Mothers Get Admitted to Hospital? Sex Differences in 1-Year Survival After the First Admission to Hospital at Age 50+

Publikation: Konferencebidrag uden forlag/tidsskriftKonferenceabstrakt til konferenceForskningpeer review

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Resumé

Women have lower mortality at all ages and a survival advantage with respect to most causes of death, including acute life-threatening events. We assume the sex differences in survival to be larger after the onset of an acute health condition. Using a 5% random sample of the Danish population, we compare the absolute sex differences in 1-year survival after the first hospital admission at age 50+ with the differentials in the corresponding general and never-hospitalized population at age 50—69 during the years 1977—2011 in Denmark. We find the male excess mortality after an admission to hospital to be on average 5.5 times higher than in the corresponding general population, and 6.9 times higher than in the never-hospitalized population. Our study establishes a link between the widening of sex differentials in survival as health deteriorates and points towards higher sex differences in survival in populations with lower health status.
OriginalsprogEngelsk
Publikationsdato15. dec. 2016
Antal sider4
StatusUdgivet - 15. dec. 2016
BegivenhedPopulation Association of America 2017 - Hilton Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA
Varighed: 24. apr. 201729. maj 2017
http://www.populationassociation.org/sidebar/annual-meeting/

Konference

KonferencePopulation Association of America 2017
LokationHilton Chicago
LandUSA
ByChicago, IL
Periode24/04/201729/05/2017
Internetadresse

Fingeraftryk

Fathers
Sex Characteristics
Mothers
Population
Health
Denmark
Cause of Death

Citer dette

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title = "Should We be More Worried When Our Fathers or Our Mothers Get Admitted to Hospital? Sex Differences in 1-Year Survival After the First Admission to Hospital at Age 50+",
abstract = "Women have lower mortality at all ages and a survival advantage with respect to most causes of death, including acute life-threatening events. We assume the sex differences in survival to be larger after the onset of an acute health condition. Using a 5{\%} random sample of the Danish population, we compare the absolute sex differences in 1-year survival after the first hospital admission at age 50+ with the differentials in the corresponding general and never-hospitalized population at age 50—69 during the years 1977—2011 in Denmark. We find the male excess mortality after an admission to hospital to be on average 5.5 times higher than in the corresponding general population, and 6.9 times higher than in the never-hospitalized population. Our study establishes a link between the widening of sex differentials in survival as health deteriorates and points towards higher sex differences in survival in populations with lower health status.",
author = "Andreas H{\"o}hn and Rune Lindahl-Jacobsen and Roland Rau and Anna Oksuzyan and Kaare Christensen",
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day = "15",
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Should We be More Worried When Our Fathers or Our Mothers Get Admitted to Hospital? Sex Differences in 1-Year Survival After the First Admission to Hospital at Age 50+. / Höhn, Andreas; Lindahl-Jacobsen, Rune; Rau, Roland; Oksuzyan, Anna; Christensen, Kaare.

2016. Abstract fra Population Association of America 2017, Chicago, IL, USA.

Publikation: Konferencebidrag uden forlag/tidsskriftKonferenceabstrakt til konferenceForskningpeer review

TY - ABST

T1 - Should We be More Worried When Our Fathers or Our Mothers Get Admitted to Hospital? Sex Differences in 1-Year Survival After the First Admission to Hospital at Age 50+

AU - Höhn, Andreas

AU - Lindahl-Jacobsen, Rune

AU - Rau, Roland

AU - Oksuzyan, Anna

AU - Christensen, Kaare

PY - 2016/12/15

Y1 - 2016/12/15

N2 - Women have lower mortality at all ages and a survival advantage with respect to most causes of death, including acute life-threatening events. We assume the sex differences in survival to be larger after the onset of an acute health condition. Using a 5% random sample of the Danish population, we compare the absolute sex differences in 1-year survival after the first hospital admission at age 50+ with the differentials in the corresponding general and never-hospitalized population at age 50—69 during the years 1977—2011 in Denmark. We find the male excess mortality after an admission to hospital to be on average 5.5 times higher than in the corresponding general population, and 6.9 times higher than in the never-hospitalized population. Our study establishes a link between the widening of sex differentials in survival as health deteriorates and points towards higher sex differences in survival in populations with lower health status.

AB - Women have lower mortality at all ages and a survival advantage with respect to most causes of death, including acute life-threatening events. We assume the sex differences in survival to be larger after the onset of an acute health condition. Using a 5% random sample of the Danish population, we compare the absolute sex differences in 1-year survival after the first hospital admission at age 50+ with the differentials in the corresponding general and never-hospitalized population at age 50—69 during the years 1977—2011 in Denmark. We find the male excess mortality after an admission to hospital to be on average 5.5 times higher than in the corresponding general population, and 6.9 times higher than in the never-hospitalized population. Our study establishes a link between the widening of sex differentials in survival as health deteriorates and points towards higher sex differences in survival in populations with lower health status.

M3 - Conference abstract for conference

ER -