Should infant girls receive micronutrient supplements?

Christine Stabell Benn, Sofia Lantz, Ane Fisker, Mathias Jul Jørgensen, Peter Aaby

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

BACKGROUND: We have proposed the hypothesis that the combination of vitamin A supplementation and diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis (DTP) vaccination may be associated with increased mortality in girls. Recent zinc/folic acid (FA) and iron supplementation trials did not find any beneficial effects on mortality. We reviewed the studies for evidence of a negative interaction between zinc/folic acid/iron and DTP vaccination in girls.

METHODS: Based on the published papers, we calculated age- and sex-specific mortality estimates. No vaccination status data were provided.

RESULTS: Both zinc/FA and iron seemed to have a sex- and age-differential effect, the effect being less beneficial in the youngest girls who are most likely to have DTP vaccine as their most recent vaccination.

CONCLUSIONS: Like vitamin A, zinc/FA and iron may not benefit the youngest girls. The question is whether this is inherent in girls or due to an interaction with some environmental factor like DTP.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftInternational Journal of Epidemiology
Vol/bind38
Udgave nummer2
Sider (fra-til)586-90
Antal sider5
ISSN0300-5771
DOI
StatusUdgivet - apr. 2009

Fingeraftryk

Micronutrients
Diphtheria
Zinc
Whooping Cough
Iron
Diphtheria-Tetanus-Pertussis Vaccine

Citer dette

Benn, Christine Stabell ; Lantz, Sofia ; Fisker, Ane ; Jørgensen, Mathias Jul ; Aaby, Peter. / Should infant girls receive micronutrient supplements?. I: International Journal of Epidemiology. 2009 ; Bind 38, Nr. 2. s. 586-90.
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title = "Should infant girls receive micronutrient supplements?",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: We have proposed the hypothesis that the combination of vitamin A supplementation and diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis (DTP) vaccination may be associated with increased mortality in girls. Recent zinc/folic acid (FA) and iron supplementation trials did not find any beneficial effects on mortality. We reviewed the studies for evidence of a negative interaction between zinc/folic acid/iron and DTP vaccination in girls.METHODS: Based on the published papers, we calculated age- and sex-specific mortality estimates. No vaccination status data were provided.RESULTS: Both zinc/FA and iron seemed to have a sex- and age-differential effect, the effect being less beneficial in the youngest girls who are most likely to have DTP vaccine as their most recent vaccination.CONCLUSIONS: Like vitamin A, zinc/FA and iron may not benefit the youngest girls. The question is whether this is inherent in girls or due to an interaction with some environmental factor like DTP.",
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Should infant girls receive micronutrient supplements? / Benn, Christine Stabell; Lantz, Sofia; Fisker, Ane; Jørgensen, Mathias Jul; Aaby, Peter.

I: International Journal of Epidemiology, Bind 38, Nr. 2, 04.2009, s. 586-90.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Should infant girls receive micronutrient supplements?

AU - Benn, Christine Stabell

AU - Lantz, Sofia

AU - Fisker, Ane

AU - Jørgensen, Mathias Jul

AU - Aaby, Peter

PY - 2009/4

Y1 - 2009/4

N2 - BACKGROUND: We have proposed the hypothesis that the combination of vitamin A supplementation and diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis (DTP) vaccination may be associated with increased mortality in girls. Recent zinc/folic acid (FA) and iron supplementation trials did not find any beneficial effects on mortality. We reviewed the studies for evidence of a negative interaction between zinc/folic acid/iron and DTP vaccination in girls.METHODS: Based on the published papers, we calculated age- and sex-specific mortality estimates. No vaccination status data were provided.RESULTS: Both zinc/FA and iron seemed to have a sex- and age-differential effect, the effect being less beneficial in the youngest girls who are most likely to have DTP vaccine as their most recent vaccination.CONCLUSIONS: Like vitamin A, zinc/FA and iron may not benefit the youngest girls. The question is whether this is inherent in girls or due to an interaction with some environmental factor like DTP.

AB - BACKGROUND: We have proposed the hypothesis that the combination of vitamin A supplementation and diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis (DTP) vaccination may be associated with increased mortality in girls. Recent zinc/folic acid (FA) and iron supplementation trials did not find any beneficial effects on mortality. We reviewed the studies for evidence of a negative interaction between zinc/folic acid/iron and DTP vaccination in girls.METHODS: Based on the published papers, we calculated age- and sex-specific mortality estimates. No vaccination status data were provided.RESULTS: Both zinc/FA and iron seemed to have a sex- and age-differential effect, the effect being less beneficial in the youngest girls who are most likely to have DTP vaccine as their most recent vaccination.CONCLUSIONS: Like vitamin A, zinc/FA and iron may not benefit the youngest girls. The question is whether this is inherent in girls or due to an interaction with some environmental factor like DTP.

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KW - Child Mortality

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KW - Diphtheria-Tetanus-Pertussis Vaccine

KW - Drug Interactions

KW - Female

KW - Humans

KW - Infant

KW - Infant Mortality

KW - Iron

KW - Male

KW - Micronutrients

KW - Sex Factors

KW - Vitamin A

KW - Zinc

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KW - Review

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JO - International Journal of Epidemiology

JF - International Journal of Epidemiology

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