Sex differences in treatment-seeking behavior by education and marital status before and after admission to hospital. A register-based cohort study of the Danish population aged 50+.

Publikation: Konferencebidrag uden forlag/tidsskriftKonferenceabstrakt til konferenceForskningpeer review

Resumé

A large body of previous research has shown that men tend to seek medical help less than women, which can lead to delays in diagnosis and treatment, and might explain a portion of the female advantage in survival. Using Danish register data, we identified all individuals aged 50+ who were admitted to hospital between 1999 and 2008. For this population, we identified all contacts with GPs between 1996 and 2011 to quantify the sex differences in treatment-seeking behavior within the 3-year periods before and after hospitalization, and to estimate the impact of the civil and educational status on the sex differentials in treatment-seeking. We found women having consistently more GP contacts across all ages, but a narrowing of the treatment-seeking behavior shortly before and after admission to hospital. We moreover found a gradient of the educational and the marital status, suggesting that groups with higher mortality have more GP contacts.
OriginalsprogDansk
Publikationsdato8. jan. 2018
StatusUdgivet - 8. jan. 2018
BegivenhedPopulation Association of America (PAA) -
Varighed: 25. apr. 201828. apr. 2018

Konference

KonferencePopulation Association of America (PAA)
Periode25/04/201828/04/2018

Citer dette

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title = "Sex differences in treatment-seeking behavior by education and marital status before and after admission to hospital. A register-based cohort study of the Danish population aged 50+.",
abstract = "A large body of previous research has shown that men tend to seek medical help less than women, which can lead to delays in diagnosis and treatment, and might explain a portion of the female advantage in survival. Using Danish register data, we identified all individuals aged 50+ who were admitted to hospital between 1999 and 2008. For this population, we identified all contacts with GPs between 1996 and 2011 to quantify the sex differences in treatment-seeking behavior within the 3-year periods before and after hospitalization, and to estimate the impact of the civil and educational status on the sex differentials in treatment-seeking. We found women having consistently more GP contacts across all ages, but a narrowing of the treatment-seeking behavior shortly before and after admission to hospital. We moreover found a gradient of the educational and the marital status, suggesting that groups with higher mortality have more GP contacts.",
author = "Andreas H{\"o}hn and Rune Lindahl-Jacobsen and Roland Rau and Kaare Christensen and Anna Oksuzyan",
year = "2018",
month = "1",
day = "8",
language = "Dansk",
note = "Population Association of America (PAA) ; Conference date: 25-04-2018 Through 28-04-2018",

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Sex differences in treatment-seeking behavior by education and marital status before and after admission to hospital. A register-based cohort study of the Danish population aged 50+. / Höhn, Andreas; Lindahl-Jacobsen, Rune; Rau, Roland; Christensen, Kaare; Oksuzyan, Anna.

2018. Abstract fra Population Association of America (PAA), .

Publikation: Konferencebidrag uden forlag/tidsskriftKonferenceabstrakt til konferenceForskningpeer review

TY - ABST

T1 - Sex differences in treatment-seeking behavior by education and marital status before and after admission to hospital. A register-based cohort study of the Danish population aged 50+.

AU - Höhn, Andreas

AU - Lindahl-Jacobsen, Rune

AU - Rau, Roland

AU - Christensen, Kaare

AU - Oksuzyan, Anna

PY - 2018/1/8

Y1 - 2018/1/8

N2 - A large body of previous research has shown that men tend to seek medical help less than women, which can lead to delays in diagnosis and treatment, and might explain a portion of the female advantage in survival. Using Danish register data, we identified all individuals aged 50+ who were admitted to hospital between 1999 and 2008. For this population, we identified all contacts with GPs between 1996 and 2011 to quantify the sex differences in treatment-seeking behavior within the 3-year periods before and after hospitalization, and to estimate the impact of the civil and educational status on the sex differentials in treatment-seeking. We found women having consistently more GP contacts across all ages, but a narrowing of the treatment-seeking behavior shortly before and after admission to hospital. We moreover found a gradient of the educational and the marital status, suggesting that groups with higher mortality have more GP contacts.

AB - A large body of previous research has shown that men tend to seek medical help less than women, which can lead to delays in diagnosis and treatment, and might explain a portion of the female advantage in survival. Using Danish register data, we identified all individuals aged 50+ who were admitted to hospital between 1999 and 2008. For this population, we identified all contacts with GPs between 1996 and 2011 to quantify the sex differences in treatment-seeking behavior within the 3-year periods before and after hospitalization, and to estimate the impact of the civil and educational status on the sex differentials in treatment-seeking. We found women having consistently more GP contacts across all ages, but a narrowing of the treatment-seeking behavior shortly before and after admission to hospital. We moreover found a gradient of the educational and the marital status, suggesting that groups with higher mortality have more GP contacts.

M3 - Konferenceabstrakt til konference

ER -