Severe obesity and diabetes self-care attitudes, behaviours and burden

implications for weight management from a matched case-controlled study. Results from Diabetes MILES--Australia

John B Dixon, Jessica L Browne, K G Mosely, T L Rice, K M Jones, F Pouwer, Jane Speight

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

AIMS: To investigate whether diabetes self-care attitudes, behaviours and perceived burden, particularly related to weight management, diet and physical activity, differ between adults with Type 2 diabetes who are severely obese and matched non-severely obese control subjects.

METHODS: The 1795 respondents to the Diabetes MILES--Australia national survey had Type 2 diabetes and reported height and weight data, enabling BMI calculation: 530 (30%) were severely obese (BMI ≥ 35 kg/m(2); median BMI = 41.6 kg/m(2)) and these were matched with 530 control subjects (BMI < 35 kg/m(2); median BMI = 28.2 kg/m(2)). Diabetes self-care behaviours, attitudes and burden were measured with the Diabetes Self-Care Inventory-Revised. Within-group and between-group trends were examined.

RESULTS: The group with BMI ≥ 35 kg/m(2) was less likely to achieve healthy diet and exercise targets, placed less importance on diet and exercise recommendations, and found the burden of diet and exercise recommendations to be greater than the group with BMI < 35 kg/m(2). The group with BMI ≥ 35 kg/m(2) was more likely to be actively trying to lose weight, but found weight control a greater burden. These issues accentuated with increasing obesity and were greatest in those with BMI > 45 kg/m(2). There were no between-group differences in other aspects of diabetes self-care: self-monitoring of blood glucose, use of medications and smoking. Moderate-to-severe symptoms of depression were independently associated with reduced likelihood of healthy diet and physical activity, and with greater burden associated with diet, physical activity and weight management.

CONCLUSIONS: Severely obese people with diabetes demonstrated self-care attitudes, behaviours and burdens that infer barriers to weight loss. However, other important diabetes self-care behaviours are supported equally by severely obese and non-severely obese individuals.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftDiabetic Medicine Online
Vol/bind31
Udgave nummer2
Sider (fra-til)232-240
ISSN1464-5491
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 2014
Udgivet eksterntJa

Fingeraftryk

Morbid Obesity
Weights and Measures
Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Blood Glucose Self-Monitoring
Diet
Smoking
Depression
Surveys and Questionnaires

Citer dette

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title = "Severe obesity and diabetes self-care attitudes, behaviours and burden: implications for weight management from a matched case-controlled study. Results from Diabetes MILES--Australia",
abstract = "AIMS: To investigate whether diabetes self-care attitudes, behaviours and perceived burden, particularly related to weight management, diet and physical activity, differ between adults with Type 2 diabetes who are severely obese and matched non-severely obese control subjects.METHODS: The 1795 respondents to the Diabetes MILES--Australia national survey had Type 2 diabetes and reported height and weight data, enabling BMI calculation: 530 (30{\%}) were severely obese (BMI ≥ 35 kg/m(2); median BMI = 41.6 kg/m(2)) and these were matched with 530 control subjects (BMI < 35 kg/m(2); median BMI = 28.2 kg/m(2)). Diabetes self-care behaviours, attitudes and burden were measured with the Diabetes Self-Care Inventory-Revised. Within-group and between-group trends were examined.RESULTS: The group with BMI ≥ 35 kg/m(2) was less likely to achieve healthy diet and exercise targets, placed less importance on diet and exercise recommendations, and found the burden of diet and exercise recommendations to be greater than the group with BMI < 35 kg/m(2). The group with BMI ≥ 35 kg/m(2) was more likely to be actively trying to lose weight, but found weight control a greater burden. These issues accentuated with increasing obesity and were greatest in those with BMI > 45 kg/m(2). There were no between-group differences in other aspects of diabetes self-care: self-monitoring of blood glucose, use of medications and smoking. Moderate-to-severe symptoms of depression were independently associated with reduced likelihood of healthy diet and physical activity, and with greater burden associated with diet, physical activity and weight management.CONCLUSIONS: Severely obese people with diabetes demonstrated self-care attitudes, behaviours and burdens that infer barriers to weight loss. However, other important diabetes self-care behaviours are supported equally by severely obese and non-severely obese individuals.",
keywords = "Adult, Aged, Attitude to Health, Australia, Behavior, Case-Control Studies, Cost of Illness, Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2, Female, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Obesity, Morbid, Perception, Self Care, Weight Reduction Programs, Journal Article, Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't",
author = "Dixon, {John B} and Browne, {Jessica L} and Mosely, {K G} and Rice, {T L} and Jones, {K M} and F Pouwer and Jane Speight",
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journal = "Diabetic Medicine Online",
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Severe obesity and diabetes self-care attitudes, behaviours and burden : implications for weight management from a matched case-controlled study. Results from Diabetes MILES--Australia. / Dixon, John B; Browne, Jessica L; Mosely, K G; Rice, T L; Jones, K M; Pouwer, F; Speight, Jane.

I: Diabetic Medicine Online, Bind 31, Nr. 2, 2014, s. 232-240.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Severe obesity and diabetes self-care attitudes, behaviours and burden

T2 - implications for weight management from a matched case-controlled study. Results from Diabetes MILES--Australia

AU - Dixon, John B

AU - Browne, Jessica L

AU - Mosely, K G

AU - Rice, T L

AU - Jones, K M

AU - Pouwer, F

AU - Speight, Jane

N1 - © 2013 The Authors. Diabetic Medicine © 2013 Diabetes UK.

PY - 2014

Y1 - 2014

N2 - AIMS: To investigate whether diabetes self-care attitudes, behaviours and perceived burden, particularly related to weight management, diet and physical activity, differ between adults with Type 2 diabetes who are severely obese and matched non-severely obese control subjects.METHODS: The 1795 respondents to the Diabetes MILES--Australia national survey had Type 2 diabetes and reported height and weight data, enabling BMI calculation: 530 (30%) were severely obese (BMI ≥ 35 kg/m(2); median BMI = 41.6 kg/m(2)) and these were matched with 530 control subjects (BMI < 35 kg/m(2); median BMI = 28.2 kg/m(2)). Diabetes self-care behaviours, attitudes and burden were measured with the Diabetes Self-Care Inventory-Revised. Within-group and between-group trends were examined.RESULTS: The group with BMI ≥ 35 kg/m(2) was less likely to achieve healthy diet and exercise targets, placed less importance on diet and exercise recommendations, and found the burden of diet and exercise recommendations to be greater than the group with BMI < 35 kg/m(2). The group with BMI ≥ 35 kg/m(2) was more likely to be actively trying to lose weight, but found weight control a greater burden. These issues accentuated with increasing obesity and were greatest in those with BMI > 45 kg/m(2). There were no between-group differences in other aspects of diabetes self-care: self-monitoring of blood glucose, use of medications and smoking. Moderate-to-severe symptoms of depression were independently associated with reduced likelihood of healthy diet and physical activity, and with greater burden associated with diet, physical activity and weight management.CONCLUSIONS: Severely obese people with diabetes demonstrated self-care attitudes, behaviours and burdens that infer barriers to weight loss. However, other important diabetes self-care behaviours are supported equally by severely obese and non-severely obese individuals.

AB - AIMS: To investigate whether diabetes self-care attitudes, behaviours and perceived burden, particularly related to weight management, diet and physical activity, differ between adults with Type 2 diabetes who are severely obese and matched non-severely obese control subjects.METHODS: The 1795 respondents to the Diabetes MILES--Australia national survey had Type 2 diabetes and reported height and weight data, enabling BMI calculation: 530 (30%) were severely obese (BMI ≥ 35 kg/m(2); median BMI = 41.6 kg/m(2)) and these were matched with 530 control subjects (BMI < 35 kg/m(2); median BMI = 28.2 kg/m(2)). Diabetes self-care behaviours, attitudes and burden were measured with the Diabetes Self-Care Inventory-Revised. Within-group and between-group trends were examined.RESULTS: The group with BMI ≥ 35 kg/m(2) was less likely to achieve healthy diet and exercise targets, placed less importance on diet and exercise recommendations, and found the burden of diet and exercise recommendations to be greater than the group with BMI < 35 kg/m(2). The group with BMI ≥ 35 kg/m(2) was more likely to be actively trying to lose weight, but found weight control a greater burden. These issues accentuated with increasing obesity and were greatest in those with BMI > 45 kg/m(2). There were no between-group differences in other aspects of diabetes self-care: self-monitoring of blood glucose, use of medications and smoking. Moderate-to-severe symptoms of depression were independently associated with reduced likelihood of healthy diet and physical activity, and with greater burden associated with diet, physical activity and weight management.CONCLUSIONS: Severely obese people with diabetes demonstrated self-care attitudes, behaviours and burdens that infer barriers to weight loss. However, other important diabetes self-care behaviours are supported equally by severely obese and non-severely obese individuals.

KW - Adult

KW - Aged

KW - Attitude to Health

KW - Australia

KW - Behavior

KW - Case-Control Studies

KW - Cost of Illness

KW - Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2

KW - Female

KW - Humans

KW - Male

KW - Middle Aged

KW - Obesity, Morbid

KW - Perception

KW - Self Care

KW - Weight Reduction Programs

KW - Journal Article

KW - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

U2 - 10.1111/dme.12306

DO - 10.1111/dme.12306

M3 - Journal article

VL - 31

SP - 232

EP - 240

JO - Diabetic Medicine Online

JF - Diabetic Medicine Online

SN - 1464-5491

IS - 2

ER -