Self-reported access to and quality of healthcare for diabetes

do the severely obese experience equal access?

John B Dixon, Jessica L Browne, Toni Rice, Kay Jones, Frans Pouwer, Jane Speight

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

BACKGROUND: Given reported pejorative views that health professionals have about patients who are severely obese, we examined the self-reported views of the quality and availability of diabetes care from the perspective of adults with type 2 diabetes (T2DM), stratified by body mass index (BMI).

METHODS: 1795 respondents to the Diabetes MILES - Australia national survey had T2DM. Of these, 530 (30%) were severely obese (BMI ≥35 kg/m²) and these participants were matched with 530 controls (BMI <35 kg/m²). Data regarding participants' self-reported interactions with health practitioners and services were compared.

RESULTS: Over 70% of participants reported that their general practitioner was the professional they relied on most for diabetes care. There were no between-group differences in patient-reported availability of health services, quality of interaction with health practitioners, resources and support for self-management, or access to almost all diabetes services.

DISCUSSION: Participants who were severely obese did not generally report greater difficulty in accessing diabetes care.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftAustralian family physician
Vol/bind43
Udgave nummer8
Sider (fra-til)552-556
ISSN0300-8495
StatusUdgivet - 2014
Udgivet eksterntJa

Fingeraftryk

Quality of Health Care
Body Mass Index
Health Services Accessibility
Health Resources
General Practitioners
Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Health Services
Health
Surveys and Questionnaires

Citer dette

Dixon, John B ; Browne, Jessica L ; Rice, Toni ; Jones, Kay ; Pouwer, Frans ; Speight, Jane. / Self-reported access to and quality of healthcare for diabetes : do the severely obese experience equal access?. I: Australian family physician. 2014 ; Bind 43, Nr. 8. s. 552-556.
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Self-reported access to and quality of healthcare for diabetes : do the severely obese experience equal access? / Dixon, John B; Browne, Jessica L; Rice, Toni; Jones, Kay; Pouwer, Frans; Speight, Jane.

I: Australian family physician, Bind 43, Nr. 8, 2014, s. 552-556.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Self-reported access to and quality of healthcare for diabetes

T2 - do the severely obese experience equal access?

AU - Dixon, John B

AU - Browne, Jessica L

AU - Rice, Toni

AU - Jones, Kay

AU - Pouwer, Frans

AU - Speight, Jane

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N2 - BACKGROUND: Given reported pejorative views that health professionals have about patients who are severely obese, we examined the self-reported views of the quality and availability of diabetes care from the perspective of adults with type 2 diabetes (T2DM), stratified by body mass index (BMI).METHODS: 1795 respondents to the Diabetes MILES - Australia national survey had T2DM. Of these, 530 (30%) were severely obese (BMI ≥35 kg/m²) and these participants were matched with 530 controls (BMI <35 kg/m²). Data regarding participants' self-reported interactions with health practitioners and services were compared.RESULTS: Over 70% of participants reported that their general practitioner was the professional they relied on most for diabetes care. There were no between-group differences in patient-reported availability of health services, quality of interaction with health practitioners, resources and support for self-management, or access to almost all diabetes services.DISCUSSION: Participants who were severely obese did not generally report greater difficulty in accessing diabetes care.

AB - BACKGROUND: Given reported pejorative views that health professionals have about patients who are severely obese, we examined the self-reported views of the quality and availability of diabetes care from the perspective of adults with type 2 diabetes (T2DM), stratified by body mass index (BMI).METHODS: 1795 respondents to the Diabetes MILES - Australia national survey had T2DM. Of these, 530 (30%) were severely obese (BMI ≥35 kg/m²) and these participants were matched with 530 controls (BMI <35 kg/m²). Data regarding participants' self-reported interactions with health practitioners and services were compared.RESULTS: Over 70% of participants reported that their general practitioner was the professional they relied on most for diabetes care. There were no between-group differences in patient-reported availability of health services, quality of interaction with health practitioners, resources and support for self-management, or access to almost all diabetes services.DISCUSSION: Participants who were severely obese did not generally report greater difficulty in accessing diabetes care.

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