SearCh for humourIstic and Extravagant acroNyms and Thoroughly Inappropriate names For Important Clinical trials (SCIENTIFIC): qualitative and quantitative systematic study

Anton Pottegård, M. B. Haastrup, T. B. Stage, Morten Rix Hansen, Kasper Søltoft Larsen, P. M. Meegaard, L. H. Meegaard, H. Horneberg, Charlotte Gils, D. Dideriksen, L. Aagaard, A. B. Almarsdottir, J. Hallas, P. Damkier

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

OBJECTIVES: To describe the development of acronym use across five major medical specialties and to evaluate the technical and aesthetic quality of the acronyms. DESIGN: Acronyms obtained through a literature search of Pubmed.gov followed by a standardised assessment of acronym quality (BEAUTY and CHEATING criteria). PARTICIPANTS: Randomised controlled trials within psychiatry, rheumatology, pulmonary medicine, endocrinology, and cardiology published between 2000 and 2012. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Prevalence proportion of acronyms and composite quality score for acronyms over time. RESULTS: 14,965 publications were identified, of which 18.3% (n=2737) contained an acronym in the title. Acronym use was more common among cardiological studies than among the other four medical specialties (40% v 8-15% in 2012, P
OriginalsprogEngelsk
Artikelnummerg7092
TidsskriftB M J
Vol/bind349
Antal sider11
ISSN0959-8146
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 2014

Citer dette

@article{b382319050b4401f85636f070b8279da,
title = "SearCh for humourIstic and Extravagant acroNyms and Thoroughly Inappropriate names For Important Clinical trials (SCIENTIFIC): qualitative and quantitative systematic study",
abstract = "OBJECTIVES: To describe the development of acronym use across five major medical specialties and to evaluate the technical and aesthetic quality of the acronyms. DESIGN: Acronyms obtained through a literature search of Pubmed.gov followed by a standardised assessment of acronym quality (BEAUTY and CHEATING criteria). PARTICIPANTS: Randomised controlled trials within psychiatry, rheumatology, pulmonary medicine, endocrinology, and cardiology published between 2000 and 2012. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Prevalence proportion of acronyms and composite quality score for acronyms over time. RESULTS: 14,965 publications were identified, of which 18.3{\%} (n=2737) contained an acronym in the title. Acronym use was more common among cardiological studies than among the other four medical specialties (40{\%} v 8-15{\%} in 2012, P",
author = "Anton Potteg{\aa}rd and Haastrup, {M. B.} and Stage, {T. B.} and Hansen, {Morten Rix} and Larsen, {Kasper S{\o}ltoft} and Meegaard, {P. M.} and Meegaard, {L. H.} and H. Horneberg and Charlotte Gils and D. Dideriksen and L. Aagaard and Almarsdottir, {A. B.} and J. Hallas and P. Damkier",
year = "2014",
doi = "10.1136/bmj.g7092",
language = "English",
volume = "349",
journal = "B M J",
issn = "0959-8146",
publisher = "BMJ Group",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - SearCh for humourIstic and Extravagant acroNyms and Thoroughly Inappropriate names For Important Clinical trials (SCIENTIFIC)

T2 - qualitative and quantitative systematic study

AU - Pottegård, Anton

AU - Haastrup, M. B.

AU - Stage, T. B.

AU - Hansen, Morten Rix

AU - Larsen, Kasper Søltoft

AU - Meegaard, P. M.

AU - Meegaard, L. H.

AU - Horneberg, H.

AU - Gils, Charlotte

AU - Dideriksen, D.

AU - Aagaard, L.

AU - Almarsdottir, A. B.

AU - Hallas, J.

AU - Damkier, P.

PY - 2014

Y1 - 2014

N2 - OBJECTIVES: To describe the development of acronym use across five major medical specialties and to evaluate the technical and aesthetic quality of the acronyms. DESIGN: Acronyms obtained through a literature search of Pubmed.gov followed by a standardised assessment of acronym quality (BEAUTY and CHEATING criteria). PARTICIPANTS: Randomised controlled trials within psychiatry, rheumatology, pulmonary medicine, endocrinology, and cardiology published between 2000 and 2012. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Prevalence proportion of acronyms and composite quality score for acronyms over time. RESULTS: 14,965 publications were identified, of which 18.3% (n=2737) contained an acronym in the title. Acronym use was more common among cardiological studies than among the other four medical specialties (40% v 8-15% in 2012, P

AB - OBJECTIVES: To describe the development of acronym use across five major medical specialties and to evaluate the technical and aesthetic quality of the acronyms. DESIGN: Acronyms obtained through a literature search of Pubmed.gov followed by a standardised assessment of acronym quality (BEAUTY and CHEATING criteria). PARTICIPANTS: Randomised controlled trials within psychiatry, rheumatology, pulmonary medicine, endocrinology, and cardiology published between 2000 and 2012. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Prevalence proportion of acronyms and composite quality score for acronyms over time. RESULTS: 14,965 publications were identified, of which 18.3% (n=2737) contained an acronym in the title. Acronym use was more common among cardiological studies than among the other four medical specialties (40% v 8-15% in 2012, P

U2 - 10.1136/bmj.g7092

DO - 10.1136/bmj.g7092

M3 - Journal article

VL - 349

JO - B M J

JF - B M J

SN - 0959-8146

M1 - g7092

ER -