Schoolyard Characteristics, Physical Activity, and Sedentary Behavior: Combining GPS and Accelerometry

Dave H H Van Kann, Sanne I de Vries, Jasper Schipperijn, Nanne K de Vries, Maria W J Jansen, Stef P J Kremers

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

BACKGROUND: Physical activity (PA) is decreasing among children, while sedentary behavior (SB) is increasing. Schoolyards seem suitable settings to influence children's PA behavior. This study investigated the associations between schoolyard characteristics and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) and SB of children aged 8-11 years at schoolyards.

METHODS: Twenty primary schools in the Netherlands were involved. A total of 257 children wore an accelerometer and global positioning system (GPS) device for 5 consecutive days to objectively assess their PA levels and presence at the schoolyard, respectively. Accelerometer and GPS data were merged using the personal activity and location measurement system. Multilevel linear regression analyses were used to study correlates of MVPA and SB at schoolyards.

RESULTS: On average, children spent 54 minutes a day at the schoolyard, 9 minutes of which were spent in MVPA and 20 minutes in SB. Boys engaged in MVPA longer than girls at the schoolyard. Fixed equipment, such as high bars and soccer goals, teacher-initiated activities, and the presence of a ball games policy were correlates of more MVPA and less SB.

CONCLUSION: Well-designed schoolyards, including PA-enhancing fixed equipment, a supportive PA climate created by teachers, and supportive schoolyard policies may contribute to increased PA and decreased SB during school recess among school-aged children.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftJournal of School Health
Vol/bind86
Udgave nummer12
Sider (fra-til)913-921
ISSN0022-4391
DOI
StatusUdgivet - dec. 2016

Fingeraftryk

Geographic Information Systems
Exercise
Equipment and Supplies
Physical Activity
Global Positioning System
Soccer
Child Behavior
soccer
Netherlands
teacher
Linear Models
school
Regression Analysis
primary school

Citer dette

Van Kann, D. H. H., de Vries, S. I., Schipperijn, J., de Vries, N. K., Jansen, M. W. J., & Kremers, S. P. J. (2016). Schoolyard Characteristics, Physical Activity, and Sedentary Behavior: Combining GPS and Accelerometry. Journal of School Health, 86(12), 913-921. https://doi.org/10.1111/josh.12459
Van Kann, Dave H H ; de Vries, Sanne I ; Schipperijn, Jasper ; de Vries, Nanne K ; Jansen, Maria W J ; Kremers, Stef P J. / Schoolyard Characteristics, Physical Activity, and Sedentary Behavior : Combining GPS and Accelerometry. I: Journal of School Health. 2016 ; Bind 86, Nr. 12. s. 913-921.
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abstract = "BACKGROUND: Physical activity (PA) is decreasing among children, while sedentary behavior (SB) is increasing. Schoolyards seem suitable settings to influence children's PA behavior. This study investigated the associations between schoolyard characteristics and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) and SB of children aged 8-11 years at schoolyards.METHODS: Twenty primary schools in the Netherlands were involved. A total of 257 children wore an accelerometer and global positioning system (GPS) device for 5 consecutive days to objectively assess their PA levels and presence at the schoolyard, respectively. Accelerometer and GPS data were merged using the personal activity and location measurement system. Multilevel linear regression analyses were used to study correlates of MVPA and SB at schoolyards.RESULTS: On average, children spent 54 minutes a day at the schoolyard, 9 minutes of which were spent in MVPA and 20 minutes in SB. Boys engaged in MVPA longer than girls at the schoolyard. Fixed equipment, such as high bars and soccer goals, teacher-initiated activities, and the presence of a ball games policy were correlates of more MVPA and less SB.CONCLUSION: Well-designed schoolyards, including PA-enhancing fixed equipment, a supportive PA climate created by teachers, and supportive schoolyard policies may contribute to increased PA and decreased SB during school recess among school-aged children.",
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Schoolyard Characteristics, Physical Activity, and Sedentary Behavior : Combining GPS and Accelerometry. / Van Kann, Dave H H; de Vries, Sanne I; Schipperijn, Jasper; de Vries, Nanne K; Jansen, Maria W J; Kremers, Stef P J.

I: Journal of School Health, Bind 86, Nr. 12, 12.2016, s. 913-921.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Schoolyard Characteristics, Physical Activity, and Sedentary Behavior

T2 - Combining GPS and Accelerometry

AU - Van Kann, Dave H H

AU - de Vries, Sanne I

AU - Schipperijn, Jasper

AU - de Vries, Nanne K

AU - Jansen, Maria W J

AU - Kremers, Stef P J

N1 - © 2016, American School Health Association.

PY - 2016/12

Y1 - 2016/12

N2 - BACKGROUND: Physical activity (PA) is decreasing among children, while sedentary behavior (SB) is increasing. Schoolyards seem suitable settings to influence children's PA behavior. This study investigated the associations between schoolyard characteristics and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) and SB of children aged 8-11 years at schoolyards.METHODS: Twenty primary schools in the Netherlands were involved. A total of 257 children wore an accelerometer and global positioning system (GPS) device for 5 consecutive days to objectively assess their PA levels and presence at the schoolyard, respectively. Accelerometer and GPS data were merged using the personal activity and location measurement system. Multilevel linear regression analyses were used to study correlates of MVPA and SB at schoolyards.RESULTS: On average, children spent 54 minutes a day at the schoolyard, 9 minutes of which were spent in MVPA and 20 minutes in SB. Boys engaged in MVPA longer than girls at the schoolyard. Fixed equipment, such as high bars and soccer goals, teacher-initiated activities, and the presence of a ball games policy were correlates of more MVPA and less SB.CONCLUSION: Well-designed schoolyards, including PA-enhancing fixed equipment, a supportive PA climate created by teachers, and supportive schoolyard policies may contribute to increased PA and decreased SB during school recess among school-aged children.

AB - BACKGROUND: Physical activity (PA) is decreasing among children, while sedentary behavior (SB) is increasing. Schoolyards seem suitable settings to influence children's PA behavior. This study investigated the associations between schoolyard characteristics and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) and SB of children aged 8-11 years at schoolyards.METHODS: Twenty primary schools in the Netherlands were involved. A total of 257 children wore an accelerometer and global positioning system (GPS) device for 5 consecutive days to objectively assess their PA levels and presence at the schoolyard, respectively. Accelerometer and GPS data were merged using the personal activity and location measurement system. Multilevel linear regression analyses were used to study correlates of MVPA and SB at schoolyards.RESULTS: On average, children spent 54 minutes a day at the schoolyard, 9 minutes of which were spent in MVPA and 20 minutes in SB. Boys engaged in MVPA longer than girls at the schoolyard. Fixed equipment, such as high bars and soccer goals, teacher-initiated activities, and the presence of a ball games policy were correlates of more MVPA and less SB.CONCLUSION: Well-designed schoolyards, including PA-enhancing fixed equipment, a supportive PA climate created by teachers, and supportive schoolyard policies may contribute to increased PA and decreased SB during school recess among school-aged children.

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VL - 86

SP - 913

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JO - Journal of School Health

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