Risk factors for hospitalization due to community-acquired sepsis - a population-based case-control study

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

BACKGROUND: The aim of the study was to estimate risk factors for hospitalization due to sepsis and to determine whether these risk factors vary by age and gender.

METHODS: We performed a population-based case-control study of all adult patients admitted to a medical ED from September 2010 to August 2011. Controls were sampled within the hospital catchment-area. All potential cases were manually validated using a structured protocol. Vital signs and laboratory values measured at arrival were registered to define systemic inflammatory response syndrome and organ dysfunction. Multivariable logistic regression was used to elucidate which predefined risk factors were associated with an increased or decreased risk hospitalization due to sepsis.

RESULTS: A total of 1713 patients were admitted with sepsis of any severity. The median age was 72 years (interquartile range: 57-81 years) and 793 (46.3%) were male. 621 (36.3%) patients were admitted with sepsis, 1071 (62.5%) with severe sepsis and 21 (1.2%) with septic shock. Episodes with sepsis of any severity were associated with older age (85+ years adjusted OR 6.02 [95%CI: 5.09-7.12]), immunosuppression (4.41 [3.83-5.09]), alcoholism-related conditions (2.90 [2.41-3.50]), and certain comorbidities: psychotic disorder (1.90 [1.58-2.27]), neurological (1.98 [1.73-2.26]), respiratory (3.58 [3.16-4.06]), cardiovascular (1.62 [1.41-1.85]), diabetes (1.82 [1.57-2.12]), cancer (1.44 [1.22-1.68]), gastrointestinal (1.71 [1.44-2.05]) and renal (1.46 [1.13-1.89]). The strength of the observed associations for comorbid factors was strongest among younger individuals.

CONCLUSIONS: Hospitalization due to sepsis of any severity was associated with several independent risk factors, including age and comorbid factors.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftPLOS ONE
Vol/bind10
Udgave nummer4
Sider (fra-til)e0124838
ISSN1932-6203
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 2015

Fingeraftryk

sepsis (infection)
case-control studies
Case-Control Studies
risk factors
Population
Medical problems
Catchments
septic shock
Logistics
Vital Signs
Age Factors
risk reduction
immunosuppression
alcohol abuse
Septic Shock
Alcoholism
diabetes
Comorbidity
inflammation
Logistic Models

Citer dette

@article{cbc72d603bd84cc18310fb8f225d6f6e,
title = "Risk factors for hospitalization due to community-acquired sepsis - a population-based case-control study",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: The aim of the study was to estimate risk factors for hospitalization due to sepsis and to determine whether these risk factors vary by age and gender.METHODS: We performed a population-based case-control study of all adult patients admitted to a medical ED from September 2010 to August 2011. Controls were sampled within the hospital catchment-area. All potential cases were manually validated using a structured protocol. Vital signs and laboratory values measured at arrival were registered to define systemic inflammatory response syndrome and organ dysfunction. Multivariable logistic regression was used to elucidate which predefined risk factors were associated with an increased or decreased risk hospitalization due to sepsis.RESULTS: A total of 1713 patients were admitted with sepsis of any severity. The median age was 72 years (interquartile range: 57-81 years) and 793 (46.3{\%}) were male. 621 (36.3{\%}) patients were admitted with sepsis, 1071 (62.5{\%}) with severe sepsis and 21 (1.2{\%}) with septic shock. Episodes with sepsis of any severity were associated with older age (85+ years adjusted OR 6.02 [95{\%}CI: 5.09-7.12]), immunosuppression (4.41 [3.83-5.09]), alcoholism-related conditions (2.90 [2.41-3.50]), and certain comorbidities: psychotic disorder (1.90 [1.58-2.27]), neurological (1.98 [1.73-2.26]), respiratory (3.58 [3.16-4.06]), cardiovascular (1.62 [1.41-1.85]), diabetes (1.82 [1.57-2.12]), cancer (1.44 [1.22-1.68]), gastrointestinal (1.71 [1.44-2.05]) and renal (1.46 [1.13-1.89]). The strength of the observed associations for comorbid factors was strongest among younger individuals.CONCLUSIONS: Hospitalization due to sepsis of any severity was associated with several independent risk factors, including age and comorbid factors.",
author = "Henriksen, {Daniel Pilsgaard} and Anton Potteg{\aa}rd and Laursen, {Christian B} and Jensen, {Th{\o}ger Gorm} and Jesper Hallas and Court Pedersen and Lassen, {Annmarie Touborg}",
year = "2015",
doi = "10.1371/journal.pone.0124838",
language = "English",
volume = "10",
pages = "e0124838",
journal = "P L o S One",
issn = "1932-6203",
publisher = "Public Library of Science",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Risk factors for hospitalization due to community-acquired sepsis - a population-based case-control study

AU - Henriksen, Daniel Pilsgaard

AU - Pottegård, Anton

AU - Laursen, Christian B

AU - Jensen, Thøger Gorm

AU - Hallas, Jesper

AU - Pedersen, Court

AU - Lassen, Annmarie Touborg

PY - 2015

Y1 - 2015

N2 - BACKGROUND: The aim of the study was to estimate risk factors for hospitalization due to sepsis and to determine whether these risk factors vary by age and gender.METHODS: We performed a population-based case-control study of all adult patients admitted to a medical ED from September 2010 to August 2011. Controls were sampled within the hospital catchment-area. All potential cases were manually validated using a structured protocol. Vital signs and laboratory values measured at arrival were registered to define systemic inflammatory response syndrome and organ dysfunction. Multivariable logistic regression was used to elucidate which predefined risk factors were associated with an increased or decreased risk hospitalization due to sepsis.RESULTS: A total of 1713 patients were admitted with sepsis of any severity. The median age was 72 years (interquartile range: 57-81 years) and 793 (46.3%) were male. 621 (36.3%) patients were admitted with sepsis, 1071 (62.5%) with severe sepsis and 21 (1.2%) with septic shock. Episodes with sepsis of any severity were associated with older age (85+ years adjusted OR 6.02 [95%CI: 5.09-7.12]), immunosuppression (4.41 [3.83-5.09]), alcoholism-related conditions (2.90 [2.41-3.50]), and certain comorbidities: psychotic disorder (1.90 [1.58-2.27]), neurological (1.98 [1.73-2.26]), respiratory (3.58 [3.16-4.06]), cardiovascular (1.62 [1.41-1.85]), diabetes (1.82 [1.57-2.12]), cancer (1.44 [1.22-1.68]), gastrointestinal (1.71 [1.44-2.05]) and renal (1.46 [1.13-1.89]). The strength of the observed associations for comorbid factors was strongest among younger individuals.CONCLUSIONS: Hospitalization due to sepsis of any severity was associated with several independent risk factors, including age and comorbid factors.

AB - BACKGROUND: The aim of the study was to estimate risk factors for hospitalization due to sepsis and to determine whether these risk factors vary by age and gender.METHODS: We performed a population-based case-control study of all adult patients admitted to a medical ED from September 2010 to August 2011. Controls were sampled within the hospital catchment-area. All potential cases were manually validated using a structured protocol. Vital signs and laboratory values measured at arrival were registered to define systemic inflammatory response syndrome and organ dysfunction. Multivariable logistic regression was used to elucidate which predefined risk factors were associated with an increased or decreased risk hospitalization due to sepsis.RESULTS: A total of 1713 patients were admitted with sepsis of any severity. The median age was 72 years (interquartile range: 57-81 years) and 793 (46.3%) were male. 621 (36.3%) patients were admitted with sepsis, 1071 (62.5%) with severe sepsis and 21 (1.2%) with septic shock. Episodes with sepsis of any severity were associated with older age (85+ years adjusted OR 6.02 [95%CI: 5.09-7.12]), immunosuppression (4.41 [3.83-5.09]), alcoholism-related conditions (2.90 [2.41-3.50]), and certain comorbidities: psychotic disorder (1.90 [1.58-2.27]), neurological (1.98 [1.73-2.26]), respiratory (3.58 [3.16-4.06]), cardiovascular (1.62 [1.41-1.85]), diabetes (1.82 [1.57-2.12]), cancer (1.44 [1.22-1.68]), gastrointestinal (1.71 [1.44-2.05]) and renal (1.46 [1.13-1.89]). The strength of the observed associations for comorbid factors was strongest among younger individuals.CONCLUSIONS: Hospitalization due to sepsis of any severity was associated with several independent risk factors, including age and comorbid factors.

U2 - 10.1371/journal.pone.0124838

DO - 10.1371/journal.pone.0124838

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 25898024

VL - 10

SP - e0124838

JO - P L o S One

JF - P L o S One

SN - 1932-6203

IS - 4

ER -