Review of research grant allocation to psychosocial studies in diabetes research

A Jones, Michael Vallis, Debbie Cooke, F Pouwer

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftReviewForskningpeer review

Resumé

AIMS: To estimate and discuss the allocation of diabetes research funds to studies with a psychosocial focus.

METHODS: Annual reports and funded-research databases from approximately the last 5 years (if available) were reviewed from the following representative funding organizations, the American Diabetes Association, the Canadian Diabetes Association, Diabetes Australia, Diabetes UK, the Dutch Diabetes Research Foundation and the European Foundation for the Study of Diabetes, in order to estimate the overall proportion of studies allocated research funding that had a psychosocial focus.

RESULTS: An estimated mean of 8% of funded studies from our sample were found to have a psychosocial focus.

CONCLUSIONS: The proportion of funded studies with a psychosocial focus was small, with an estimated mean ratio of 17:1 observed between funded biomedical and psychosocial studies in diabetes research. While several factors may account for this finding, the observation that 90% of funded studies are biomedical may be partly attributable to the methodological orthodoxy of applying biomedical reductionism to understand and treat disease. A more comprehensive and systemic whole-person approach in diabetes research that resembles more closely the complexity of human beings is needed and may lead to improved care for individuals living with diabetes or at risk of diabetes.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftDiabetic Medicine
Vol/bind33
Udgave nummer12
Sider (fra-til)1673-1676
Antal sider4
ISSN0742-3071
DOI
StatusUdgivet - dec. 2016

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Citer dette

Jones, A ; Vallis, Michael ; Cooke, Debbie ; Pouwer, F. / Review of research grant allocation to psychosocial studies in diabetes research. I: Diabetic Medicine. 2016 ; Bind 33, Nr. 12. s. 1673-1676.
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title = "Review of research grant allocation to psychosocial studies in diabetes research",
abstract = "AIMS: To estimate and discuss the allocation of diabetes research funds to studies with a psychosocial focus.METHODS: Annual reports and funded-research databases from approximately the last 5 years (if available) were reviewed from the following representative funding organizations, the American Diabetes Association, the Canadian Diabetes Association, Diabetes Australia, Diabetes UK, the Dutch Diabetes Research Foundation and the European Foundation for the Study of Diabetes, in order to estimate the overall proportion of studies allocated research funding that had a psychosocial focus.RESULTS: An estimated mean of 8{\%} of funded studies from our sample were found to have a psychosocial focus.CONCLUSIONS: The proportion of funded studies with a psychosocial focus was small, with an estimated mean ratio of 17:1 observed between funded biomedical and psychosocial studies in diabetes research. While several factors may account for this finding, the observation that 90{\%} of funded studies are biomedical may be partly attributable to the methodological orthodoxy of applying biomedical reductionism to understand and treat disease. A more comprehensive and systemic whole-person approach in diabetes research that resembles more closely the complexity of human beings is needed and may lead to improved care for individuals living with diabetes or at risk of diabetes.",
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Review of research grant allocation to psychosocial studies in diabetes research. / Jones, A; Vallis, Michael; Cooke, Debbie; Pouwer, F.

I: Diabetic Medicine, Bind 33, Nr. 12, 12.2016, s. 1673-1676.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftReviewForskningpeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Review of research grant allocation to psychosocial studies in diabetes research

AU - Jones, A

AU - Vallis, Michael

AU - Cooke, Debbie

AU - Pouwer, F

N1 - © 2016 Diabetes UK.

PY - 2016/12

Y1 - 2016/12

N2 - AIMS: To estimate and discuss the allocation of diabetes research funds to studies with a psychosocial focus.METHODS: Annual reports and funded-research databases from approximately the last 5 years (if available) were reviewed from the following representative funding organizations, the American Diabetes Association, the Canadian Diabetes Association, Diabetes Australia, Diabetes UK, the Dutch Diabetes Research Foundation and the European Foundation for the Study of Diabetes, in order to estimate the overall proportion of studies allocated research funding that had a psychosocial focus.RESULTS: An estimated mean of 8% of funded studies from our sample were found to have a psychosocial focus.CONCLUSIONS: The proportion of funded studies with a psychosocial focus was small, with an estimated mean ratio of 17:1 observed between funded biomedical and psychosocial studies in diabetes research. While several factors may account for this finding, the observation that 90% of funded studies are biomedical may be partly attributable to the methodological orthodoxy of applying biomedical reductionism to understand and treat disease. A more comprehensive and systemic whole-person approach in diabetes research that resembles more closely the complexity of human beings is needed and may lead to improved care for individuals living with diabetes or at risk of diabetes.

AB - AIMS: To estimate and discuss the allocation of diabetes research funds to studies with a psychosocial focus.METHODS: Annual reports and funded-research databases from approximately the last 5 years (if available) were reviewed from the following representative funding organizations, the American Diabetes Association, the Canadian Diabetes Association, Diabetes Australia, Diabetes UK, the Dutch Diabetes Research Foundation and the European Foundation for the Study of Diabetes, in order to estimate the overall proportion of studies allocated research funding that had a psychosocial focus.RESULTS: An estimated mean of 8% of funded studies from our sample were found to have a psychosocial focus.CONCLUSIONS: The proportion of funded studies with a psychosocial focus was small, with an estimated mean ratio of 17:1 observed between funded biomedical and psychosocial studies in diabetes research. While several factors may account for this finding, the observation that 90% of funded studies are biomedical may be partly attributable to the methodological orthodoxy of applying biomedical reductionism to understand and treat disease. A more comprehensive and systemic whole-person approach in diabetes research that resembles more closely the complexity of human beings is needed and may lead to improved care for individuals living with diabetes or at risk of diabetes.

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DO - 10.1111/dme.13255

M3 - Review

VL - 33

SP - 1673

EP - 1676

JO - Diabetic Medicine

JF - Diabetic Medicine

SN - 0742-3071

IS - 12

ER -