Response of fermentation and sulfate reduction to experimental temperature changes in temperate and Arctic marine sediments

Niko Finke, Bo Barker Jørgensen

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

Udgivelsesdato: 2008-Aug
OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftISME Journal
Vol/bind2
Udgave nummer8
Sider (fra-til)815-829
Antal sider14
ISSN1751-7362
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 1. aug. 2008

Fingeraftryk

Geologic Sediments
marine sediments
Fermentation
marine sediment
fermentation
Arctic region
sulfates
sulfate
fatty acid
Volatile Fatty Acids
sediment
volatile fatty acids
sediments
temperature
incubation
North Sea
methanogenesis
sulfate-reducing bacterium
hydrolysis
acetate

Citer dette

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title = "Response of fermentation and sulfate reduction to experimental temperature changes in temperate and Arctic marine sediments",
abstract = "Anaerobic degradation of organic material generally proceeds through a sequence of steps, including polymer hydrolysis, fermentation and respiration or methanogenesis. The intermediates, such as volatile fatty acids (VFA) or H(2), are generally maintained at low concentration, showing a close coupling of the terminal oxidation to fermentation. We exposed marine sediments to extreme temperature perturbations to study the nature and robustness of this coupling. Bacterial sulfate reduction and its dependence on fermentation were studied experimentally over a broad temperature range of -0.3 to 40 degrees C in sediments from temperate and permanently cold environments. In an Arctic sediment from Svalbard, the apparent optimum temperature for sulfate reduction decreased with prolonged incubation, whereas sulfate reduction rates increased. In a temperate sediment from the North Sea, the apparent optimum temperature was higher and did not change with incubation time. Up to a critical temperature, the concentrations of VFA remained low, <3 microM for acetate and <1 microM for the other VFA, the H(2) concentration showed thermodynamic control by sulfate-reducing bacteria, revealing a close coupling of fermentation and sulfate reduction. Above the critical temperature, the concentrations of VFA and H(2) increased transiently by 100-1000-fold. According to the different in situ temperatures of the samples, the critical temperature was lower for sediments from the Arctic than from the North Sea. The H(2) concentrations decreased again upon prolonged incubation to values typical for sulfate-depleted methanogenic sediments. This suggests that fermentative bacteria and methanogenic archaea in both sediments tolerated higher temperatures than the sulfate-reducing community.",
keywords = "Archaea, Bacteria, Fatty Acids, Volatile, Fermentation, Geologic Sediments, Hydrogen, Methane, North Sea, Oxidation-Reduction, Sulfates, Svalbard, Temperature, Time Factors",
author = "Niko Finke and J{\o}rgensen, {Bo Barker}",
year = "2008",
month = "8",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1038/ISMEJ.2008.20",
language = "English",
volume = "2",
pages = "815--829",
journal = "I S M E Journal",
issn = "1751-7362",
publisher = "Nature Publishing Group",
number = "8",

}

Response of fermentation and sulfate reduction to experimental temperature changes in temperate and Arctic marine sediments. / Finke, Niko; Jørgensen, Bo Barker.

I: ISME Journal, Bind 2, Nr. 8, 01.08.2008, s. 815-829.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Response of fermentation and sulfate reduction to experimental temperature changes in temperate and Arctic marine sediments

AU - Finke, Niko

AU - Jørgensen, Bo Barker

PY - 2008/8/1

Y1 - 2008/8/1

N2 - Anaerobic degradation of organic material generally proceeds through a sequence of steps, including polymer hydrolysis, fermentation and respiration or methanogenesis. The intermediates, such as volatile fatty acids (VFA) or H(2), are generally maintained at low concentration, showing a close coupling of the terminal oxidation to fermentation. We exposed marine sediments to extreme temperature perturbations to study the nature and robustness of this coupling. Bacterial sulfate reduction and its dependence on fermentation were studied experimentally over a broad temperature range of -0.3 to 40 degrees C in sediments from temperate and permanently cold environments. In an Arctic sediment from Svalbard, the apparent optimum temperature for sulfate reduction decreased with prolonged incubation, whereas sulfate reduction rates increased. In a temperate sediment from the North Sea, the apparent optimum temperature was higher and did not change with incubation time. Up to a critical temperature, the concentrations of VFA remained low, <3 microM for acetate and <1 microM for the other VFA, the H(2) concentration showed thermodynamic control by sulfate-reducing bacteria, revealing a close coupling of fermentation and sulfate reduction. Above the critical temperature, the concentrations of VFA and H(2) increased transiently by 100-1000-fold. According to the different in situ temperatures of the samples, the critical temperature was lower for sediments from the Arctic than from the North Sea. The H(2) concentrations decreased again upon prolonged incubation to values typical for sulfate-depleted methanogenic sediments. This suggests that fermentative bacteria and methanogenic archaea in both sediments tolerated higher temperatures than the sulfate-reducing community.

AB - Anaerobic degradation of organic material generally proceeds through a sequence of steps, including polymer hydrolysis, fermentation and respiration or methanogenesis. The intermediates, such as volatile fatty acids (VFA) or H(2), are generally maintained at low concentration, showing a close coupling of the terminal oxidation to fermentation. We exposed marine sediments to extreme temperature perturbations to study the nature and robustness of this coupling. Bacterial sulfate reduction and its dependence on fermentation were studied experimentally over a broad temperature range of -0.3 to 40 degrees C in sediments from temperate and permanently cold environments. In an Arctic sediment from Svalbard, the apparent optimum temperature for sulfate reduction decreased with prolonged incubation, whereas sulfate reduction rates increased. In a temperate sediment from the North Sea, the apparent optimum temperature was higher and did not change with incubation time. Up to a critical temperature, the concentrations of VFA remained low, <3 microM for acetate and <1 microM for the other VFA, the H(2) concentration showed thermodynamic control by sulfate-reducing bacteria, revealing a close coupling of fermentation and sulfate reduction. Above the critical temperature, the concentrations of VFA and H(2) increased transiently by 100-1000-fold. According to the different in situ temperatures of the samples, the critical temperature was lower for sediments from the Arctic than from the North Sea. The H(2) concentrations decreased again upon prolonged incubation to values typical for sulfate-depleted methanogenic sediments. This suggests that fermentative bacteria and methanogenic archaea in both sediments tolerated higher temperatures than the sulfate-reducing community.

KW - Archaea

KW - Bacteria

KW - Fatty Acids, Volatile

KW - Fermentation

KW - Geologic Sediments

KW - Hydrogen

KW - Methane

KW - North Sea

KW - Oxidation-Reduction

KW - Sulfates

KW - Svalbard

KW - Temperature

KW - Time Factors

U2 - 10.1038/ISMEJ.2008.20

DO - 10.1038/ISMEJ.2008.20

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 18309360

VL - 2

SP - 815

EP - 829

JO - I S M E Journal

JF - I S M E Journal

SN - 1751-7362

IS - 8

ER -