Renin release

Frank Schweda, Ulla Friis, Charlotte Wagner, Ole Skøtt, Armin Kurtz

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftReviewForskning

Resumé

 
Udgivelsesdato: 2007-Oct
OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftPhysiology
Vol/bind22
Udgave nummer5
Sider (fra-til)310-319
Antal sider9
ISSN1548-9213
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 1. okt. 2007

Fingeraftryk

Renin
Salts
Epithelioid Cells
Renin-Angiotensin System
Homeostasis
Kidney

Citer dette

Schweda, F., Friis, U., Wagner, C., Skøtt, O., & Kurtz, A. (2007). Renin release. Physiology, 22(5), 310-319. https://doi.org/10.1152/physiol.00024.2007
Schweda, Frank ; Friis, Ulla ; Wagner, Charlotte ; Skøtt, Ole ; Kurtz, Armin. / Renin release. I: Physiology. 2007 ; Bind 22, Nr. 5. s. 310-319.
@article{1d2ab0d0d8cb11dc860c000ea68e967b,
title = "Renin release",
abstract = "The aspartyl-protease renin is the key regulator of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, which is critically involved in salt, volume, and blood pressure homeostasis of the body. Renin is mainly produced and released into circulation by the so-called juxtaglomerular epithelioid cells, located in the walls of renal afferent arterioles at the entrance of the glomerular capillary network. It has been known for a long time that renin synthesis and secretion are stimulated by the sympathetic nerves and the prostaglandins and are inhibited in negative feedback loops by angiotensin II, high blood pressure, salt, and volume overload. In contrast, the events controlling the function of renin-secreting cells at the organ and cellular level are markedly less clear and remain mysterious in certain aspects. The unravelling of these mysteries has led to new and interesting insights into the process of renin release.",
keywords = "Animals, Cyclic AMP, Humans, Juxtaglomerular Apparatus, Kidney, Paracrine Communication, Protein Processing, Post-Translational, Renin, Secretory Vesicles, Signal Transduction",
author = "Frank Schweda and Ulla Friis and Charlotte Wagner and Ole Sk{\o}tt and Armin Kurtz",
year = "2007",
month = "10",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1152/physiol.00024.2007",
language = "English",
volume = "22",
pages = "310--319",
journal = "Physiology",
issn = "1548-9213",
publisher = "American Physiological Society",
number = "5",

}

Schweda, F, Friis, U, Wagner, C, Skøtt, O & Kurtz, A 2007, 'Renin release', Physiology, bind 22, nr. 5, s. 310-319. https://doi.org/10.1152/physiol.00024.2007

Renin release. / Schweda, Frank; Friis, Ulla; Wagner, Charlotte; Skøtt, Ole; Kurtz, Armin.

I: Physiology, Bind 22, Nr. 5, 01.10.2007, s. 310-319.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftReviewForskning

TY - JOUR

T1 - Renin release

AU - Schweda, Frank

AU - Friis, Ulla

AU - Wagner, Charlotte

AU - Skøtt, Ole

AU - Kurtz, Armin

PY - 2007/10/1

Y1 - 2007/10/1

N2 - The aspartyl-protease renin is the key regulator of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, which is critically involved in salt, volume, and blood pressure homeostasis of the body. Renin is mainly produced and released into circulation by the so-called juxtaglomerular epithelioid cells, located in the walls of renal afferent arterioles at the entrance of the glomerular capillary network. It has been known for a long time that renin synthesis and secretion are stimulated by the sympathetic nerves and the prostaglandins and are inhibited in negative feedback loops by angiotensin II, high blood pressure, salt, and volume overload. In contrast, the events controlling the function of renin-secreting cells at the organ and cellular level are markedly less clear and remain mysterious in certain aspects. The unravelling of these mysteries has led to new and interesting insights into the process of renin release.

AB - The aspartyl-protease renin is the key regulator of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, which is critically involved in salt, volume, and blood pressure homeostasis of the body. Renin is mainly produced and released into circulation by the so-called juxtaglomerular epithelioid cells, located in the walls of renal afferent arterioles at the entrance of the glomerular capillary network. It has been known for a long time that renin synthesis and secretion are stimulated by the sympathetic nerves and the prostaglandins and are inhibited in negative feedback loops by angiotensin II, high blood pressure, salt, and volume overload. In contrast, the events controlling the function of renin-secreting cells at the organ and cellular level are markedly less clear and remain mysterious in certain aspects. The unravelling of these mysteries has led to new and interesting insights into the process of renin release.

KW - Animals

KW - Cyclic AMP

KW - Humans

KW - Juxtaglomerular Apparatus

KW - Kidney

KW - Paracrine Communication

KW - Protein Processing, Post-Translational

KW - Renin

KW - Secretory Vesicles

KW - Signal Transduction

U2 - 10.1152/physiol.00024.2007

DO - 10.1152/physiol.00024.2007

M3 - Review

VL - 22

SP - 310

EP - 319

JO - Physiology

JF - Physiology

SN - 1548-9213

IS - 5

ER -

Schweda F, Friis U, Wagner C, Skøtt O, Kurtz A. Renin release. Physiology. 2007 okt 1;22(5):310-319. https://doi.org/10.1152/physiol.00024.2007