Remission of encephalopathy with status epilepticus (ESES) during sleep renormalizes regulation of slow wave sleep

Bigna K. Bölsterli*, Elena Gardella, Elena Pavlidis, Flavia M. Wehrle, Carlo A. Tassinari, Reto Huber, Guido Rubboli

*Kontaktforfatter for dette arbejde

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

Objective: In previous studies, we showed an altered overnight decrease of non–rapid-eye-movement (NREM) sleep slow waves in children with encephalopathy related to status epilepticus during sleep (ESES). Here, we test the hypothesis that these alterations renormalize after remission of ESES. Because overnight decrease of slow waves has been linked to brain recovery and cognition, we investigate whether cognitive outcome is related to overnight changes of slow waves. Methods: We performed a retrospective analysis of longitudinal overnight electroencephalography (EEG) in 10 patients with idiopathic ESES. Automated slow wave detection and calculation of slope of slow waves during the first and last hour of NREM sleep were employed. Intraindividual comparisons were undertaken of the slope during active phase and after remission of ESES, and between patients after remission of ESES and healthy controls. Explorative analysis of the relationship between slow wave slope and cognitive outcome was performed. Results: The slope of slow waves did not decrease significantly across the night during active ESES, particularly at the spike focus. After remission of ESES, the slope decreased significantly overnight. Compared to controls, there was no difference in overnight slope decrease. Association between slope and neuropsychological outcome showed best cognitive outcome after remission in those children (n = 3) who showed some degree of slope decline during active ESES. Significance: This study provides evidence that alterations of overnight changes of NREM-sleep slow waves during active ESES are reversible when ESES resolves, and that the severity of neuropsychological compromise might be related to the extent of slow wave impairment during ESES. Our findings suggest that analysis of slow waves might serve as a prognostic factor regarding cognitive outcome. ESES may serve as disease model of pathologic slow wave sleep and our results might be expanded to epilepsies with spike wave activation in slow wave sleep not only in children but also in adults.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftEpilepsia
Vol/bind58
Udgave nummer11
Sider (fra-til)1892-1901
ISSN0013-9580
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 2017

Fingeraftryk

Eye Movements
Cognition
Electroencephalography

Citer dette

Bölsterli, B. K., Gardella, E., Pavlidis, E., Wehrle, F. M., Tassinari, C. A., Huber, R., & Rubboli, G. (2017). Remission of encephalopathy with status epilepticus (ESES) during sleep renormalizes regulation of slow wave sleep. Epilepsia, 58(11), 1892-1901. https://doi.org/10.1111/epi.13910
Bölsterli, Bigna K. ; Gardella, Elena ; Pavlidis, Elena ; Wehrle, Flavia M. ; Tassinari, Carlo A. ; Huber, Reto ; Rubboli, Guido. / Remission of encephalopathy with status epilepticus (ESES) during sleep renormalizes regulation of slow wave sleep. I: Epilepsia. 2017 ; Bind 58, Nr. 11. s. 1892-1901.
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title = "Remission of encephalopathy with status epilepticus (ESES) during sleep renormalizes regulation of slow wave sleep",
abstract = "Objective: In previous studies, we showed an altered overnight decrease of non–rapid-eye-movement (NREM) sleep slow waves in children with encephalopathy related to status epilepticus during sleep (ESES). Here, we test the hypothesis that these alterations renormalize after remission of ESES. Because overnight decrease of slow waves has been linked to brain recovery and cognition, we investigate whether cognitive outcome is related to overnight changes of slow waves. Methods: We performed a retrospective analysis of longitudinal overnight electroencephalography (EEG) in 10 patients with idiopathic ESES. Automated slow wave detection and calculation of slope of slow waves during the first and last hour of NREM sleep were employed. Intraindividual comparisons were undertaken of the slope during active phase and after remission of ESES, and between patients after remission of ESES and healthy controls. Explorative analysis of the relationship between slow wave slope and cognitive outcome was performed. Results: The slope of slow waves did not decrease significantly across the night during active ESES, particularly at the spike focus. After remission of ESES, the slope decreased significantly overnight. Compared to controls, there was no difference in overnight slope decrease. Association between slope and neuropsychological outcome showed best cognitive outcome after remission in those children (n = 3) who showed some degree of slope decline during active ESES. Significance: This study provides evidence that alterations of overnight changes of NREM-sleep slow waves during active ESES are reversible when ESES resolves, and that the severity of neuropsychological compromise might be related to the extent of slow wave impairment during ESES. Our findings suggest that analysis of slow waves might serve as a prognostic factor regarding cognitive outcome. ESES may serve as disease model of pathologic slow wave sleep and our results might be expanded to epilepsies with spike wave activation in slow wave sleep not only in children but also in adults.",
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year = "2017",
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volume = "58",
pages = "1892--1901",
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Bölsterli, BK, Gardella, E, Pavlidis, E, Wehrle, FM, Tassinari, CA, Huber, R & Rubboli, G 2017, 'Remission of encephalopathy with status epilepticus (ESES) during sleep renormalizes regulation of slow wave sleep', Epilepsia, bind 58, nr. 11, s. 1892-1901. https://doi.org/10.1111/epi.13910

Remission of encephalopathy with status epilepticus (ESES) during sleep renormalizes regulation of slow wave sleep. / Bölsterli, Bigna K.; Gardella, Elena; Pavlidis, Elena; Wehrle, Flavia M.; Tassinari, Carlo A.; Huber, Reto; Rubboli, Guido.

I: Epilepsia, Bind 58, Nr. 11, 2017, s. 1892-1901.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Remission of encephalopathy with status epilepticus (ESES) during sleep renormalizes regulation of slow wave sleep

AU - Bölsterli, Bigna K.

AU - Gardella, Elena

AU - Pavlidis, Elena

AU - Wehrle, Flavia M.

AU - Tassinari, Carlo A.

AU - Huber, Reto

AU - Rubboli, Guido

PY - 2017

Y1 - 2017

N2 - Objective: In previous studies, we showed an altered overnight decrease of non–rapid-eye-movement (NREM) sleep slow waves in children with encephalopathy related to status epilepticus during sleep (ESES). Here, we test the hypothesis that these alterations renormalize after remission of ESES. Because overnight decrease of slow waves has been linked to brain recovery and cognition, we investigate whether cognitive outcome is related to overnight changes of slow waves. Methods: We performed a retrospective analysis of longitudinal overnight electroencephalography (EEG) in 10 patients with idiopathic ESES. Automated slow wave detection and calculation of slope of slow waves during the first and last hour of NREM sleep were employed. Intraindividual comparisons were undertaken of the slope during active phase and after remission of ESES, and between patients after remission of ESES and healthy controls. Explorative analysis of the relationship between slow wave slope and cognitive outcome was performed. Results: The slope of slow waves did not decrease significantly across the night during active ESES, particularly at the spike focus. After remission of ESES, the slope decreased significantly overnight. Compared to controls, there was no difference in overnight slope decrease. Association between slope and neuropsychological outcome showed best cognitive outcome after remission in those children (n = 3) who showed some degree of slope decline during active ESES. Significance: This study provides evidence that alterations of overnight changes of NREM-sleep slow waves during active ESES are reversible when ESES resolves, and that the severity of neuropsychological compromise might be related to the extent of slow wave impairment during ESES. Our findings suggest that analysis of slow waves might serve as a prognostic factor regarding cognitive outcome. ESES may serve as disease model of pathologic slow wave sleep and our results might be expanded to epilepsies with spike wave activation in slow wave sleep not only in children but also in adults.

AB - Objective: In previous studies, we showed an altered overnight decrease of non–rapid-eye-movement (NREM) sleep slow waves in children with encephalopathy related to status epilepticus during sleep (ESES). Here, we test the hypothesis that these alterations renormalize after remission of ESES. Because overnight decrease of slow waves has been linked to brain recovery and cognition, we investigate whether cognitive outcome is related to overnight changes of slow waves. Methods: We performed a retrospective analysis of longitudinal overnight electroencephalography (EEG) in 10 patients with idiopathic ESES. Automated slow wave detection and calculation of slope of slow waves during the first and last hour of NREM sleep were employed. Intraindividual comparisons were undertaken of the slope during active phase and after remission of ESES, and between patients after remission of ESES and healthy controls. Explorative analysis of the relationship between slow wave slope and cognitive outcome was performed. Results: The slope of slow waves did not decrease significantly across the night during active ESES, particularly at the spike focus. After remission of ESES, the slope decreased significantly overnight. Compared to controls, there was no difference in overnight slope decrease. Association between slope and neuropsychological outcome showed best cognitive outcome after remission in those children (n = 3) who showed some degree of slope decline during active ESES. Significance: This study provides evidence that alterations of overnight changes of NREM-sleep slow waves during active ESES are reversible when ESES resolves, and that the severity of neuropsychological compromise might be related to the extent of slow wave impairment during ESES. Our findings suggest that analysis of slow waves might serve as a prognostic factor regarding cognitive outcome. ESES may serve as disease model of pathologic slow wave sleep and our results might be expanded to epilepsies with spike wave activation in slow wave sleep not only in children but also in adults.

KW - Cognition

KW - Continuous spike and waves during sleep

KW - Epilepsy

KW - Sleep homeostasis

KW - Slow waves sleep

U2 - 10.1111/epi.13910

DO - 10.1111/epi.13910

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 28960278

AN - SCOPUS:85032745289

VL - 58

SP - 1892

EP - 1901

JO - Epilepsia

JF - Epilepsia

SN - 0013-9580

IS - 11

ER -