Religiousness and lifestyle among Europeans in SHARE

Linda Juel Ahrenfeldt*, Sören Möller, N C Hvidt, R Lindahl-Jacobsen

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Resumé

OBJECTIVES: Religiousness is associated with longevity and better physical health, which may be due to lifestyle choices. Here, we examine associations between religiousness and health, explained by lifestyle.
STUDY DESIGN: This is a longitudinal study.
METHODS: Data came from 23,864 people aged 50 and above included in the Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe in 2004-2005 and followed up during 11 years.
RESULTS: Praying and taking part in a religious organization were associated with lower odds of smoking [odds ratio (OR) = 0.82, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.73, 0.92 and 0.61, 95% CI: 0.53, 0.70], alcohol consumption (OR = 0.71, 95% CI: 0.64, 0.78 and OR = 0.76, 95% CI: 0.67, 0.85), physical inactivity (OR = 0.88, 95% CI: 0.79, 0.98 and OR = 0.54, 95% CI: 0.48, 0.61), and doing no vigorous physical activity (OR = 0.92, 95% CI: 0.85, 0.98 and OR = 0.63, 95% CI: 0.58, 0.68). Furthermore, religious organizational involvement lowered the odds of sleep problems (OR = 0.83, 95% CI: 0.76, 0.91), whereas being religiously educated lowered the odds of high body weight (OR = 0.87, 95% CI: 0.79, 0.96). The more religious (people who prayed, took part in a religious organization and were religiously educated) had lower odds of smoking, alcohol consumption, physical inactivity, and sleep problems than other respondents, and compared with people who only prayed, they had lower odds of smoking, physical inactivity, and sleep problems. People who only prayed had lower odds of alcohol consumption but higher odds of sleep problems than the non-religious.
CONCLUSIONS: This study confirms that the positive relations between religiousness and health to an important degree can be explained by lifestyle.
OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftPublic Health
Vol/bind165
Sider (fra-til)74-81
ISSN0033-3506
DOI
StatusUdgivet - dec. 2018

Fingeraftryk

Confidence Intervals
Odds Ratio
Alcohol Drinking
Smoking
Health
Retirement
Health Surveys
Longitudinal Studies

Citer dette

@article{3734f1fbfb2a40b4ae04b6d21c51e727,
title = "Religiousness and lifestyle among Europeans in SHARE",
abstract = "OBJECTIVES: Religiousness is associated with longevity and better physical health, which may be due to lifestyle choices. Here, we examine associations between religiousness and health, explained by lifestyle.STUDY DESIGN: This is a longitudinal study.METHODS: Data came from 23,864 people aged 50 and above included in the Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe in 2004-2005 and followed up during 11 years.RESULTS: Praying and taking part in a religious organization were associated with lower odds of smoking [odds ratio (OR) = 0.82, 95{\%} confidence interval (CI): 0.73, 0.92 and 0.61, 95{\%} CI: 0.53, 0.70], alcohol consumption (OR = 0.71, 95{\%} CI: 0.64, 0.78 and OR = 0.76, 95{\%} CI: 0.67, 0.85), physical inactivity (OR = 0.88, 95{\%} CI: 0.79, 0.98 and OR = 0.54, 95{\%} CI: 0.48, 0.61), and doing no vigorous physical activity (OR = 0.92, 95{\%} CI: 0.85, 0.98 and OR = 0.63, 95{\%} CI: 0.58, 0.68). Furthermore, religious organizational involvement lowered the odds of sleep problems (OR = 0.83, 95{\%} CI: 0.76, 0.91), whereas being religiously educated lowered the odds of high body weight (OR = 0.87, 95{\%} CI: 0.79, 0.96). The more religious (people who prayed, took part in a religious organization and were religiously educated) had lower odds of smoking, alcohol consumption, physical inactivity, and sleep problems than other respondents, and compared with people who only prayed, they had lower odds of smoking, physical inactivity, and sleep problems. People who only prayed had lower odds of alcohol consumption but higher odds of sleep problems than the non-religious.CONCLUSIONS: This study confirms that the positive relations between religiousness and health to an important degree can be explained by lifestyle.",
keywords = "Alcohol consumption, Body Weight, Physical activity, Religiousness, Sleep problems, Smoking, Body weight, Life Style, Europe, Humans, Middle Aged, Religion, Male, Health Surveys, Female, Aged, Longitudinal Studies",
author = "Ahrenfeldt, {Linda Juel} and S{\"o}ren M{\"o}ller and Hvidt, {N C} and R Lindahl-Jacobsen",
note = "Copyright {\circledC} 2018 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.",
year = "2018",
month = "12",
doi = "10.1016/j.puhe.2018.09.009",
language = "English",
volume = "165",
pages = "74--81",
journal = "Public Health",
issn = "0033-3506",
publisher = "W.B.Saunders Co. Ltd.",

}

Religiousness and lifestyle among Europeans in SHARE. / Ahrenfeldt, Linda Juel; Möller, Sören; Hvidt, N C; Lindahl-Jacobsen, R.

I: Public Health, Bind 165, 12.2018, s. 74-81.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Religiousness and lifestyle among Europeans in SHARE

AU - Ahrenfeldt, Linda Juel

AU - Möller, Sören

AU - Hvidt, N C

AU - Lindahl-Jacobsen, R

N1 - Copyright © 2018 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

PY - 2018/12

Y1 - 2018/12

N2 - OBJECTIVES: Religiousness is associated with longevity and better physical health, which may be due to lifestyle choices. Here, we examine associations between religiousness and health, explained by lifestyle.STUDY DESIGN: This is a longitudinal study.METHODS: Data came from 23,864 people aged 50 and above included in the Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe in 2004-2005 and followed up during 11 years.RESULTS: Praying and taking part in a religious organization were associated with lower odds of smoking [odds ratio (OR) = 0.82, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.73, 0.92 and 0.61, 95% CI: 0.53, 0.70], alcohol consumption (OR = 0.71, 95% CI: 0.64, 0.78 and OR = 0.76, 95% CI: 0.67, 0.85), physical inactivity (OR = 0.88, 95% CI: 0.79, 0.98 and OR = 0.54, 95% CI: 0.48, 0.61), and doing no vigorous physical activity (OR = 0.92, 95% CI: 0.85, 0.98 and OR = 0.63, 95% CI: 0.58, 0.68). Furthermore, religious organizational involvement lowered the odds of sleep problems (OR = 0.83, 95% CI: 0.76, 0.91), whereas being religiously educated lowered the odds of high body weight (OR = 0.87, 95% CI: 0.79, 0.96). The more religious (people who prayed, took part in a religious organization and were religiously educated) had lower odds of smoking, alcohol consumption, physical inactivity, and sleep problems than other respondents, and compared with people who only prayed, they had lower odds of smoking, physical inactivity, and sleep problems. People who only prayed had lower odds of alcohol consumption but higher odds of sleep problems than the non-religious.CONCLUSIONS: This study confirms that the positive relations between religiousness and health to an important degree can be explained by lifestyle.

AB - OBJECTIVES: Religiousness is associated with longevity and better physical health, which may be due to lifestyle choices. Here, we examine associations between religiousness and health, explained by lifestyle.STUDY DESIGN: This is a longitudinal study.METHODS: Data came from 23,864 people aged 50 and above included in the Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe in 2004-2005 and followed up during 11 years.RESULTS: Praying and taking part in a religious organization were associated with lower odds of smoking [odds ratio (OR) = 0.82, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.73, 0.92 and 0.61, 95% CI: 0.53, 0.70], alcohol consumption (OR = 0.71, 95% CI: 0.64, 0.78 and OR = 0.76, 95% CI: 0.67, 0.85), physical inactivity (OR = 0.88, 95% CI: 0.79, 0.98 and OR = 0.54, 95% CI: 0.48, 0.61), and doing no vigorous physical activity (OR = 0.92, 95% CI: 0.85, 0.98 and OR = 0.63, 95% CI: 0.58, 0.68). Furthermore, religious organizational involvement lowered the odds of sleep problems (OR = 0.83, 95% CI: 0.76, 0.91), whereas being religiously educated lowered the odds of high body weight (OR = 0.87, 95% CI: 0.79, 0.96). The more religious (people who prayed, took part in a religious organization and were religiously educated) had lower odds of smoking, alcohol consumption, physical inactivity, and sleep problems than other respondents, and compared with people who only prayed, they had lower odds of smoking, physical inactivity, and sleep problems. People who only prayed had lower odds of alcohol consumption but higher odds of sleep problems than the non-religious.CONCLUSIONS: This study confirms that the positive relations between religiousness and health to an important degree can be explained by lifestyle.

KW - Alcohol consumption

KW - Body Weight

KW - Physical activity

KW - Religiousness

KW - Sleep problems

KW - Smoking

KW - Body weight

KW - Life Style

KW - Europe

KW - Humans

KW - Middle Aged

KW - Religion

KW - Male

KW - Health Surveys

KW - Female

KW - Aged

KW - Longitudinal Studies

U2 - 10.1016/j.puhe.2018.09.009

DO - 10.1016/j.puhe.2018.09.009

M3 - Journal article

VL - 165

SP - 74

EP - 81

JO - Public Health

JF - Public Health

SN - 0033-3506

ER -