Religious values of physicians affect their clinical practice: A meta-analysis of individual participant data from 7 countries

Alex Kappel Kørup*, Jens Søndergaard, Giancarlo Lucchetti, Parameshwaran Ramakrishnan, Klaus Baumann, Eunmi Lee, Eckhard Frick, Arndt Büssing, Nada A Alyousefi, Azimatul Karimah, Esther Schouten, Inga Wermuth, Niels Christian Hvidt

*Kontaktforfatter for dette arbejde

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

25 Downloads (Pure)

Resumé

BACKGROUND:
Observational studies indicate that religious values of physicians influence clinical practice. The aim of this study was to test prior hypotheses of prevalence of this influence using a meta-analysis design.

METHODS:
Based on a systematic literature search we performed individual participant data meta-analysis (IPDMA) on data based on 2 preselected questionnaires. Ten samples from 7 countries remained after exclusion (n = 3342). IPDMA was performed using a random-effects model with 2 summary measures: the mean value of the scale "Religiosity of Health Professionals"; and a dichotomized value of the question "My religious beliefs influence my practice of medicine." Also, a sensitivity analysis was performed using a mixed-models design controlling for confounders.

RESULTS:
Mean score of religiosity (95% confidence interval [CI]) was significantly lower in the European subgroup (8.46 [6.96-9.96]) compared with the Asian samples India (10.46 [9.82-10.21]) and Indonesia (12.52 [12.19-12.84]), whereas Brazil (9.76 [9.54-9.99]) and USA (10.02 [9.82-10.21]) were placed in between. The proportion of the European physicians who agreed to the statement "My religious beliefs influence my practice of medicine" (95% CI) was 42% (26%-59%) compared with Brazil (36% [29%-43%]), USA (57% [54%-60%]), India (58% [52%-63%]), and Indonesia (91% [84%-95%]).

CONCLUSIONS:
Although large cross-cultural variations existed in the samples, 50% of physicians reported to be influenced by their religious beliefs. Religiosity and influence of religious beliefs were most pronounced in India, Indonesia, and a European faith-based hospital. Education regimes of current and future physicians should encompass this influence, and help physicians learn how their personal values influence their clinical practice.
OriginalsprogEngelsk
Artikelnummere17265
TidsskriftMedicine
Vol/bind98
Udgave nummer38
ISSN0025-7974
DOI
StatusUdgivet - sep. 2019

Fingeraftryk

Meta-Analysis
Religion
Indonesia
Physicians
Medicine
Confidence Intervals
Education
Health

Citer dette

Kørup, Alex Kappel ; Søndergaard, Jens ; Lucchetti, Giancarlo ; Ramakrishnan, Parameshwaran ; Baumann, Klaus ; Lee, Eunmi ; Frick, Eckhard ; Büssing, Arndt ; Alyousefi, Nada A ; Karimah, Azimatul ; Schouten, Esther ; Wermuth, Inga ; Hvidt, Niels Christian. / Religious values of physicians affect their clinical practice : A meta-analysis of individual participant data from 7 countries. I: Medicine. 2019 ; Bind 98, Nr. 38.
@article{5b13db6d6d5f49c7b19220c7699a7313,
title = "Religious values of physicians affect their clinical practice: A meta-analysis of individual participant data from 7 countries",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: Observational studies indicate that religious values of physicians influence clinical practice. The aim of this study was to test prior hypotheses of prevalence of this influence using a meta-analysis design.METHODS: Based on a systematic literature search we performed individual participant data meta-analysis (IPDMA) on data based on 2 preselected questionnaires. Ten samples from 7 countries remained after exclusion (n = 3342). IPDMA was performed using a random-effects model with 2 summary measures: the mean value of the scale {"}Religiosity of Health Professionals{"}; and a dichotomized value of the question {"}My religious beliefs influence my practice of medicine.{"} Also, a sensitivity analysis was performed using a mixed-models design controlling for confounders.RESULTS: Mean score of religiosity (95{\%} confidence interval [CI]) was significantly lower in the European subgroup (8.46 [6.96-9.96]) compared with the Asian samples India (10.46 [9.82-10.21]) and Indonesia (12.52 [12.19-12.84]), whereas Brazil (9.76 [9.54-9.99]) and USA (10.02 [9.82-10.21]) were placed in between. The proportion of the European physicians who agreed to the statement {"}My religious beliefs influence my practice of medicine{"} (95{\%} CI) was 42{\%} (26{\%}-59{\%}) compared with Brazil (36{\%} [29{\%}-43{\%}]), USA (57{\%} [54{\%}-60{\%}]), India (58{\%} [52{\%}-63{\%}]), and Indonesia (91{\%} [84{\%}-95{\%}]).CONCLUSIONS: Although large cross-cultural variations existed in the samples, 50{\%} of physicians reported to be influenced by their religious beliefs. Religiosity and influence of religious beliefs were most pronounced in India, Indonesia, and a European faith-based hospital. Education regimes of current and future physicians should encompass this influence, and help physicians learn how their personal values influence their clinical practice.",
keywords = "medical ethics, meta-analysis, physicians, religion, value neutrality",
author = "K{\o}rup, {Alex Kappel} and Jens S{\o}ndergaard and Giancarlo Lucchetti and Parameshwaran Ramakrishnan and Klaus Baumann and Eunmi Lee and Eckhard Frick and Arndt B{\"u}ssing and Alyousefi, {Nada A} and Azimatul Karimah and Esther Schouten and Inga Wermuth and Hvidt, {Niels Christian}",
year = "2019",
month = "9",
doi = "10.1097/MD.0000000000017265",
language = "English",
volume = "98",
journal = "Medicine",
issn = "0025-7974",
publisher = "Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc.",
number = "38",

}

Religious values of physicians affect their clinical practice : A meta-analysis of individual participant data from 7 countries. / Kørup, Alex Kappel; Søndergaard, Jens; Lucchetti, Giancarlo; Ramakrishnan, Parameshwaran; Baumann, Klaus; Lee, Eunmi; Frick, Eckhard; Büssing, Arndt; Alyousefi, Nada A; Karimah, Azimatul; Schouten, Esther; Wermuth, Inga; Hvidt, Niels Christian.

I: Medicine, Bind 98, Nr. 38, e17265, 09.2019.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Religious values of physicians affect their clinical practice

T2 - A meta-analysis of individual participant data from 7 countries

AU - Kørup, Alex Kappel

AU - Søndergaard, Jens

AU - Lucchetti, Giancarlo

AU - Ramakrishnan, Parameshwaran

AU - Baumann, Klaus

AU - Lee, Eunmi

AU - Frick, Eckhard

AU - Büssing, Arndt

AU - Alyousefi, Nada A

AU - Karimah, Azimatul

AU - Schouten, Esther

AU - Wermuth, Inga

AU - Hvidt, Niels Christian

PY - 2019/9

Y1 - 2019/9

N2 - BACKGROUND: Observational studies indicate that religious values of physicians influence clinical practice. The aim of this study was to test prior hypotheses of prevalence of this influence using a meta-analysis design.METHODS: Based on a systematic literature search we performed individual participant data meta-analysis (IPDMA) on data based on 2 preselected questionnaires. Ten samples from 7 countries remained after exclusion (n = 3342). IPDMA was performed using a random-effects model with 2 summary measures: the mean value of the scale "Religiosity of Health Professionals"; and a dichotomized value of the question "My religious beliefs influence my practice of medicine." Also, a sensitivity analysis was performed using a mixed-models design controlling for confounders.RESULTS: Mean score of religiosity (95% confidence interval [CI]) was significantly lower in the European subgroup (8.46 [6.96-9.96]) compared with the Asian samples India (10.46 [9.82-10.21]) and Indonesia (12.52 [12.19-12.84]), whereas Brazil (9.76 [9.54-9.99]) and USA (10.02 [9.82-10.21]) were placed in between. The proportion of the European physicians who agreed to the statement "My religious beliefs influence my practice of medicine" (95% CI) was 42% (26%-59%) compared with Brazil (36% [29%-43%]), USA (57% [54%-60%]), India (58% [52%-63%]), and Indonesia (91% [84%-95%]).CONCLUSIONS: Although large cross-cultural variations existed in the samples, 50% of physicians reported to be influenced by their religious beliefs. Religiosity and influence of religious beliefs were most pronounced in India, Indonesia, and a European faith-based hospital. Education regimes of current and future physicians should encompass this influence, and help physicians learn how their personal values influence their clinical practice.

AB - BACKGROUND: Observational studies indicate that religious values of physicians influence clinical practice. The aim of this study was to test prior hypotheses of prevalence of this influence using a meta-analysis design.METHODS: Based on a systematic literature search we performed individual participant data meta-analysis (IPDMA) on data based on 2 preselected questionnaires. Ten samples from 7 countries remained after exclusion (n = 3342). IPDMA was performed using a random-effects model with 2 summary measures: the mean value of the scale "Religiosity of Health Professionals"; and a dichotomized value of the question "My religious beliefs influence my practice of medicine." Also, a sensitivity analysis was performed using a mixed-models design controlling for confounders.RESULTS: Mean score of religiosity (95% confidence interval [CI]) was significantly lower in the European subgroup (8.46 [6.96-9.96]) compared with the Asian samples India (10.46 [9.82-10.21]) and Indonesia (12.52 [12.19-12.84]), whereas Brazil (9.76 [9.54-9.99]) and USA (10.02 [9.82-10.21]) were placed in between. The proportion of the European physicians who agreed to the statement "My religious beliefs influence my practice of medicine" (95% CI) was 42% (26%-59%) compared with Brazil (36% [29%-43%]), USA (57% [54%-60%]), India (58% [52%-63%]), and Indonesia (91% [84%-95%]).CONCLUSIONS: Although large cross-cultural variations existed in the samples, 50% of physicians reported to be influenced by their religious beliefs. Religiosity and influence of religious beliefs were most pronounced in India, Indonesia, and a European faith-based hospital. Education regimes of current and future physicians should encompass this influence, and help physicians learn how their personal values influence their clinical practice.

KW - medical ethics

KW - meta-analysis

KW - physicians

KW - religion

KW - value neutrality

U2 - 10.1097/MD.0000000000017265

DO - 10.1097/MD.0000000000017265

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 31568003

VL - 98

JO - Medicine

JF - Medicine

SN - 0025-7974

IS - 38

M1 - e17265

ER -