Religiosity and Health-Related Risk Behaviours in a Secular Culture: Is there a Correlation?

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Resumé

In the present study, we examine the correlation between religiosity and health-related risk behaviours among citizens aged 29-60 based on a cross-sectional survey in Denmark, known for its more secular culture. Health-related risk behaviours such as smoking and alcohol intake are known to increase the risk of developing one or more chronic or life-threatening diseases. In this study religiosity, in a random sample of Danes, seems to be associated with healthier lifestyle, such as a healthier dietary pattern and less smoking, as is found in more religious cultures. Our study suggests that religious practice among Danish citizens seems to be correlated with health behaviours and that healthcare professionals should pay more attention to the connection between religiosity and health.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftJournal of Religion and Health
ISSN0022-4197
DOI
StatusE-pub ahead of print - 27. sep. 2019

Fingeraftryk

Risk-Taking
Health
Smoking
Health Behavior
Denmark
Cross-Sectional Studies
Alcohols
Delivery of Health Care
Religiosity

Citer dette

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abstract = "In the present study, we examine the correlation between religiosity and health-related risk behaviours among citizens aged 29-60 based on a cross-sectional survey in Denmark, known for its more secular culture. Health-related risk behaviours such as smoking and alcohol intake are known to increase the risk of developing one or more chronic or life-threatening diseases. In this study religiosity, in a random sample of Danes, seems to be associated with healthier lifestyle, such as a healthier dietary pattern and less smoking, as is found in more religious cultures. Our study suggests that religious practice among Danish citizens seems to be correlated with health behaviours and that healthcare professionals should pay more attention to the connection between religiosity and health.",
author = "Svensson, {Nanna Herning} and Hvidt, {Niels Christian} and Nissen, {Susanne Pagh} and Storsveen, {Maria Munch} and {Assing Hvidt}, Elisabeth and Jens S{\o}ndergaard and Trine Thilsing",
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AU - Svensson, Nanna Herning

AU - Hvidt, Niels Christian

AU - Nissen, Susanne Pagh

AU - Storsveen, Maria Munch

AU - Assing Hvidt, Elisabeth

AU - Søndergaard, Jens

AU - Thilsing, Trine

PY - 2019/9/27

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AB - In the present study, we examine the correlation between religiosity and health-related risk behaviours among citizens aged 29-60 based on a cross-sectional survey in Denmark, known for its more secular culture. Health-related risk behaviours such as smoking and alcohol intake are known to increase the risk of developing one or more chronic or life-threatening diseases. In this study religiosity, in a random sample of Danes, seems to be associated with healthier lifestyle, such as a healthier dietary pattern and less smoking, as is found in more religious cultures. Our study suggests that religious practice among Danish citizens seems to be correlated with health behaviours and that healthcare professionals should pay more attention to the connection between religiosity and health.

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JO - Journal of Religion and Health

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SN - 0022-4197

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