Quantifying syringeal dynamics in vitro using electroglottography

Jeppe H Rasmussen, Christian T Herbst, Coen P H Elemans

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

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Resumé

The complex and elaborate vocalizations uttered by many of the 10,000 extant bird species are considered a major driver in their evolutionary success, warranting study of the underlying mechanisms of vocal production. Additionally, birdsong has developed into a highly productive model system for vocal imitation learning and motor control, where, in contrast to humans, we have experimental access to the entire neuromechanical control loop. In human voice production, complex laryngeal geometry, vocal fold tissue properties, airflow and laryngeal musculature all interact to ultimately control vocal fold kinematics. Quantifying vocal fold kinematics is thus critical to understanding neuromechanical control of voiced sound production, but in vivo imaging of vocal fold kinematics in birds is experimentally challenging. Here, we adapted and tested electroglottography (EGG) as a novel tool for examining vocal fold kinematics in the avian vocal organ, the syrinx. We furthermore imaged and quantified syringeal kinematics in the pigeon (Columba livia) syrinx with unprecedented detail. Our results show that EGG signals predict (1) the relative amount of contact between the avian equivalent of vocal folds and (2) essential parameters describing vibratory kinematics, such as fundamental frequency, and timing of syringeal opening and closing events. As such, EGG provides novel opportunities for measuring syringeal vibratory kinematic parameters in vivo Furthermore, the opportunity for imaging syringeal vibratory kinematics from multiple planar views (horizontal and coronal) simultaneously promotes birds as an excellent model system for studying kinematics and control of voiced sound production in general, including in humans and other mammals.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftThe Journal of Experimental Biology
Vol/bind221
Udgave nummer16
Sider (fra-til)1-12
ISSN0022-0949
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 23. aug. 2018

Fingeraftryk

kinematics
Vocal Cords
fold
syringes
birds
image analysis
bird
In Vitro Techniques
imitation
Columba livia
vocalization
air flow
pigeons
airflow
Mammals
mammal
learning
mammals
geometry

Citer dette

Rasmussen, Jeppe H ; Herbst, Christian T ; Elemans, Coen P H. / Quantifying syringeal dynamics in vitro using electroglottography. I: The Journal of Experimental Biology. 2018 ; Bind 221, Nr. 16. s. 1-12.
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Quantifying syringeal dynamics in vitro using electroglottography. / Rasmussen, Jeppe H; Herbst, Christian T; Elemans, Coen P H.

I: The Journal of Experimental Biology, Bind 221, Nr. 16, 23.08.2018, s. 1-12.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

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T1 - Quantifying syringeal dynamics in vitro using electroglottography

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AU - Elemans, Coen P H

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