Quality of life in childhood, adolescence and adult food allergy

Patient and parent perspectives

A Stensgaard, C Bindslev-Jensen, D Nielsen, Maria Munch Storsveen, A DunnGalvin

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

BACKGROUND: Studies of children with food allergy typically only include the mother and have not investigated the relationship between the amount of allergen needed to elicit a clinical reaction (threshold) and health-related quality of life (HRQL). Our aims were (i) to compare self-reported and parent-reported HRQL in different age groups, (ii) to evaluate the impact of severity of allergic reaction and threshold on HRQL, and (iii) to investigate factors associated with patient-reported and parent-reported HRQL.

METHODS: Age-appropriate Food Allergy Quality of Life Questionnaires (FAQLQ) were completed by 73 children, 49 adolescents and 29 adults with peanut, hazelnut or egg allergy. Parents (197 mothers, 120 fathers) assessed their child's HRQL using the FAQLQ-Parent form. Clinical data and threshold values were obtained from a hospital database. Significant factors for HRQL were investigated using univariate and multivariate regression.

RESULTS: Female patients reported greater impact of food allergy on HRQL than males did. Egg and hazelnut thresholds did not affect HRQL, but lower peanut threshold was associated with worse HRQL. Both parents scored their child's HRQL better than the child's own assessment, but whereas mother-reported HRQL was significantly affected by limitations in the child's social life, father-reported HRQL was affected by limitations in the family's social life. Severity of allergic reaction did not contribute significantly to HRQL.

CONCLUSION: The risk of accidental allergen ingestion and limitations in social life are associated with worse HRQL. Fathers provide a unique perspective and should have a greater opportunity to contribute to food allergy research.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftClinical and Experimental Allergy
Vol/bind47
Udgave nummer4
Sider (fra-til)530–539
ISSN0954-7894
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 2017

Fingeraftryk

Food Hypersensitivity
Quality of Life
Fathers
Corylus
Mothers
Allergens
Hypersensitivity
Egg Hypersensitivity
Parents
Peanut Hypersensitivity

Citer dette

@article{121aae6b244e4b68bb9049b549ff849c,
title = "Quality of life in childhood, adolescence and adult food allergy: Patient and parent perspectives",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: Studies of children with food allergy typically only include the mother and have not investigated the relationship between the amount of allergen needed to elicit a clinical reaction (threshold) and health-related quality of life (HRQL). Our aims were (i) to compare self-reported and parent-reported HRQL in different age groups, (ii) to evaluate the impact of severity of allergic reaction and threshold on HRQL, and (iii) to investigate factors associated with patient-reported and parent-reported HRQL.METHODS: Age-appropriate Food Allergy Quality of Life Questionnaires (FAQLQ) were completed by 73 children, 49 adolescents and 29 adults with peanut, hazelnut or egg allergy. Parents (197 mothers, 120 fathers) assessed their child's HRQL using the FAQLQ-Parent form. Clinical data and threshold values were obtained from a hospital database. Significant factors for HRQL were investigated using univariate and multivariate regression.RESULTS: Female patients reported greater impact of food allergy on HRQL than males did. Egg and hazelnut thresholds did not affect HRQL, but lower peanut threshold was associated with worse HRQL. Both parents scored their child's HRQL better than the child's own assessment, but whereas mother-reported HRQL was significantly affected by limitations in the child's social life, father-reported HRQL was affected by limitations in the family's social life. Severity of allergic reaction did not contribute significantly to HRQL.CONCLUSION: The risk of accidental allergen ingestion and limitations in social life are associated with worse HRQL. Fathers provide a unique perspective and should have a greater opportunity to contribute to food allergy research.",
author = "A Stensgaard and C Bindslev-Jensen and D Nielsen and Storsveen, {Maria Munch} and A DunnGalvin",
note = "{\circledC} 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.",
year = "2017",
doi = "10.1111/cea.12849",
language = "English",
volume = "47",
pages = "530–539",
journal = "Clinical and Experimental Allergy",
issn = "0954-7894",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "4",

}

Quality of life in childhood, adolescence and adult food allergy : Patient and parent perspectives. / Stensgaard, A; Bindslev-Jensen, C; Nielsen, D; Storsveen, Maria Munch; DunnGalvin, A.

I: Clinical and Experimental Allergy, Bind 47, Nr. 4, 2017, s. 530–539.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Quality of life in childhood, adolescence and adult food allergy

T2 - Patient and parent perspectives

AU - Stensgaard, A

AU - Bindslev-Jensen, C

AU - Nielsen, D

AU - Storsveen, Maria Munch

AU - DunnGalvin, A

N1 - © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

PY - 2017

Y1 - 2017

N2 - BACKGROUND: Studies of children with food allergy typically only include the mother and have not investigated the relationship between the amount of allergen needed to elicit a clinical reaction (threshold) and health-related quality of life (HRQL). Our aims were (i) to compare self-reported and parent-reported HRQL in different age groups, (ii) to evaluate the impact of severity of allergic reaction and threshold on HRQL, and (iii) to investigate factors associated with patient-reported and parent-reported HRQL.METHODS: Age-appropriate Food Allergy Quality of Life Questionnaires (FAQLQ) were completed by 73 children, 49 adolescents and 29 adults with peanut, hazelnut or egg allergy. Parents (197 mothers, 120 fathers) assessed their child's HRQL using the FAQLQ-Parent form. Clinical data and threshold values were obtained from a hospital database. Significant factors for HRQL were investigated using univariate and multivariate regression.RESULTS: Female patients reported greater impact of food allergy on HRQL than males did. Egg and hazelnut thresholds did not affect HRQL, but lower peanut threshold was associated with worse HRQL. Both parents scored their child's HRQL better than the child's own assessment, but whereas mother-reported HRQL was significantly affected by limitations in the child's social life, father-reported HRQL was affected by limitations in the family's social life. Severity of allergic reaction did not contribute significantly to HRQL.CONCLUSION: The risk of accidental allergen ingestion and limitations in social life are associated with worse HRQL. Fathers provide a unique perspective and should have a greater opportunity to contribute to food allergy research.

AB - BACKGROUND: Studies of children with food allergy typically only include the mother and have not investigated the relationship between the amount of allergen needed to elicit a clinical reaction (threshold) and health-related quality of life (HRQL). Our aims were (i) to compare self-reported and parent-reported HRQL in different age groups, (ii) to evaluate the impact of severity of allergic reaction and threshold on HRQL, and (iii) to investigate factors associated with patient-reported and parent-reported HRQL.METHODS: Age-appropriate Food Allergy Quality of Life Questionnaires (FAQLQ) were completed by 73 children, 49 adolescents and 29 adults with peanut, hazelnut or egg allergy. Parents (197 mothers, 120 fathers) assessed their child's HRQL using the FAQLQ-Parent form. Clinical data and threshold values were obtained from a hospital database. Significant factors for HRQL were investigated using univariate and multivariate regression.RESULTS: Female patients reported greater impact of food allergy on HRQL than males did. Egg and hazelnut thresholds did not affect HRQL, but lower peanut threshold was associated with worse HRQL. Both parents scored their child's HRQL better than the child's own assessment, but whereas mother-reported HRQL was significantly affected by limitations in the child's social life, father-reported HRQL was affected by limitations in the family's social life. Severity of allergic reaction did not contribute significantly to HRQL.CONCLUSION: The risk of accidental allergen ingestion and limitations in social life are associated with worse HRQL. Fathers provide a unique perspective and should have a greater opportunity to contribute to food allergy research.

U2 - 10.1111/cea.12849

DO - 10.1111/cea.12849

M3 - Journal article

VL - 47

SP - 530

EP - 539

JO - Clinical and Experimental Allergy

JF - Clinical and Experimental Allergy

SN - 0954-7894

IS - 4

ER -