Qualitative exploration of practices to prevent medication errors in neonatal intensive care units: a focus group study

Rikke Mie Rishoej*, Henriette Lai Nielsen, Stina Maria Strzelec, Jane Fritsdal Refer, Sanne Allermann Beck, Hanne Marie Gramstrup, Henrik Thybo Christesen, Lene Juel Kjeldsen, Jesper Hallas, Anna Birna Almarsdóttir

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Resumé

Background: Medication errors (MEs) in neonates are frequent and associated with increased potential for harm compared with adults. The effect of learning from reported MEs is potentially lacking due to underreporting, lack of feedback and missing actions to improve medication safety. A new approach involving positive recognition of current and future strategies may facilitate greater exploration of how to improve medication safety in neonates. We aimed to explore current and potential future practices to prevent MEs in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). Methods: Focus group interviews of physicians and nurses were conducted at three Danish NICUs. Participants were included if they had at least 1 month of working experience and provided direct patient care. A semistructured interview guide involving three questions was used: (a) how do you feel about discussing prevention of MEs? (b) how do you currently prevent MEs from occurring? and (c) how can we become better at preventing MEs in the future? Content analysis was used to identify themes in the interviews. Results: Participants commented that MEs still occur and that action must be taken to improve medication safety. Current practices to prevent MEs involved technology, procedures, education, skills and hospital pharmacy services. Potential future practices to prevent MEs included customizing the computerized physician order entry systems to support optimal prescribing, standardizing the double-check process, training of calculation skills and teamwork and increased use of hospital pharmacy services. Conclusions: Several current and potential future practices to reduce MEs in NICUs were identified, highlighting the complexity of MEs. Our findings support an interdisciplinary multifaceted intervention involving both technical and nontechnical elements to improve medication safety in NICUs.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftTherapeutic Advances in Drug Safety
Vol/bind9
Udgave nummer7
Sider (fra-til)343-353
ISSN2042-0986
DOI
StatusUdgivet - jul. 2018

Fingeraftryk

Neonatal Intensive Care Units
Focus Groups
Hospital Pharmacy Services
Safety
Interviews
Medical Order Entry Systems
Newborn Infant
Nurses
Physicians
Education

Citer dette

Rishoej, R. M., Lai Nielsen, H., Strzelec, S. M., Fritsdal Refer, J., Allermann Beck, S., Gramstrup, H. M., ... Almarsdóttir, A. B. (2018). Qualitative exploration of practices to prevent medication errors in neonatal intensive care units: a focus group study. Therapeutic Advances in Drug Safety, 9(7), 343-353. https://doi.org/10.1177/2042098618771541
Rishoej, Rikke Mie ; Lai Nielsen, Henriette ; Strzelec, Stina Maria ; Fritsdal Refer, Jane ; Allermann Beck, Sanne ; Gramstrup, Hanne Marie ; Thybo Christesen, Henrik ; Juel Kjeldsen, Lene ; Hallas, Jesper ; Almarsdóttir, Anna Birna. / Qualitative exploration of practices to prevent medication errors in neonatal intensive care units : a focus group study. I: Therapeutic Advances in Drug Safety. 2018 ; Bind 9, Nr. 7. s. 343-353.
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title = "Qualitative exploration of practices to prevent medication errors in neonatal intensive care units: a focus group study",
abstract = "Background: Medication errors (MEs) in neonates are frequent and associated with increased potential for harm compared with adults. The effect of learning from reported MEs is potentially lacking due to underreporting, lack of feedback and missing actions to improve medication safety. A new approach involving positive recognition of current and future strategies may facilitate greater exploration of how to improve medication safety in neonates. We aimed to explore current and potential future practices to prevent MEs in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). Methods: Focus group interviews of physicians and nurses were conducted at three Danish NICUs. Participants were included if they had at least 1 month of working experience and provided direct patient care. A semistructured interview guide involving three questions was used: (a) how do you feel about discussing prevention of MEs? (b) how do you currently prevent MEs from occurring? and (c) how can we become better at preventing MEs in the future? Content analysis was used to identify themes in the interviews. Results: Participants commented that MEs still occur and that action must be taken to improve medication safety. Current practices to prevent MEs involved technology, procedures, education, skills and hospital pharmacy services. Potential future practices to prevent MEs included customizing the computerized physician order entry systems to support optimal prescribing, standardizing the double-check process, training of calculation skills and teamwork and increased use of hospital pharmacy services. Conclusions: Several current and potential future practices to reduce MEs in NICUs were identified, highlighting the complexity of MEs. Our findings support an interdisciplinary multifaceted intervention involving both technical and nontechnical elements to improve medication safety in NICUs.",
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author = "Rishoej, {Rikke Mie} and {Lai Nielsen}, Henriette and Strzelec, {Stina Maria} and {Fritsdal Refer}, Jane and {Allermann Beck}, Sanne and Gramstrup, {Hanne Marie} and {Thybo Christesen}, Henrik and {Juel Kjeldsen}, Lene and Jesper Hallas and Almarsd{\'o}ttir, {Anna Birna}",
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Rishoej, RM, Lai Nielsen, H, Strzelec, SM, Fritsdal Refer, J, Allermann Beck, S, Gramstrup, HM, Thybo Christesen, H, Juel Kjeldsen, L, Hallas, J & Almarsdóttir, AB 2018, 'Qualitative exploration of practices to prevent medication errors in neonatal intensive care units: a focus group study', Therapeutic Advances in Drug Safety, bind 9, nr. 7, s. 343-353. https://doi.org/10.1177/2042098618771541

Qualitative exploration of practices to prevent medication errors in neonatal intensive care units : a focus group study. / Rishoej, Rikke Mie; Lai Nielsen, Henriette; Strzelec, Stina Maria; Fritsdal Refer, Jane; Allermann Beck, Sanne; Gramstrup, Hanne Marie; Thybo Christesen, Henrik; Juel Kjeldsen, Lene; Hallas, Jesper; Almarsdóttir, Anna Birna.

I: Therapeutic Advances in Drug Safety, Bind 9, Nr. 7, 07.2018, s. 343-353.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Qualitative exploration of practices to prevent medication errors in neonatal intensive care units

T2 - a focus group study

AU - Rishoej, Rikke Mie

AU - Lai Nielsen, Henriette

AU - Strzelec, Stina Maria

AU - Fritsdal Refer, Jane

AU - Allermann Beck, Sanne

AU - Gramstrup, Hanne Marie

AU - Thybo Christesen, Henrik

AU - Juel Kjeldsen, Lene

AU - Hallas, Jesper

AU - Almarsdóttir, Anna Birna

PY - 2018/7

Y1 - 2018/7

N2 - Background: Medication errors (MEs) in neonates are frequent and associated with increased potential for harm compared with adults. The effect of learning from reported MEs is potentially lacking due to underreporting, lack of feedback and missing actions to improve medication safety. A new approach involving positive recognition of current and future strategies may facilitate greater exploration of how to improve medication safety in neonates. We aimed to explore current and potential future practices to prevent MEs in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). Methods: Focus group interviews of physicians and nurses were conducted at three Danish NICUs. Participants were included if they had at least 1 month of working experience and provided direct patient care. A semistructured interview guide involving three questions was used: (a) how do you feel about discussing prevention of MEs? (b) how do you currently prevent MEs from occurring? and (c) how can we become better at preventing MEs in the future? Content analysis was used to identify themes in the interviews. Results: Participants commented that MEs still occur and that action must be taken to improve medication safety. Current practices to prevent MEs involved technology, procedures, education, skills and hospital pharmacy services. Potential future practices to prevent MEs included customizing the computerized physician order entry systems to support optimal prescribing, standardizing the double-check process, training of calculation skills and teamwork and increased use of hospital pharmacy services. Conclusions: Several current and potential future practices to reduce MEs in NICUs were identified, highlighting the complexity of MEs. Our findings support an interdisciplinary multifaceted intervention involving both technical and nontechnical elements to improve medication safety in NICUs.

AB - Background: Medication errors (MEs) in neonates are frequent and associated with increased potential for harm compared with adults. The effect of learning from reported MEs is potentially lacking due to underreporting, lack of feedback and missing actions to improve medication safety. A new approach involving positive recognition of current and future strategies may facilitate greater exploration of how to improve medication safety in neonates. We aimed to explore current and potential future practices to prevent MEs in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). Methods: Focus group interviews of physicians and nurses were conducted at three Danish NICUs. Participants were included if they had at least 1 month of working experience and provided direct patient care. A semistructured interview guide involving three questions was used: (a) how do you feel about discussing prevention of MEs? (b) how do you currently prevent MEs from occurring? and (c) how can we become better at preventing MEs in the future? Content analysis was used to identify themes in the interviews. Results: Participants commented that MEs still occur and that action must be taken to improve medication safety. Current practices to prevent MEs involved technology, procedures, education, skills and hospital pharmacy services. Potential future practices to prevent MEs included customizing the computerized physician order entry systems to support optimal prescribing, standardizing the double-check process, training of calculation skills and teamwork and increased use of hospital pharmacy services. Conclusions: Several current and potential future practices to reduce MEs in NICUs were identified, highlighting the complexity of MEs. Our findings support an interdisciplinary multifaceted intervention involving both technical and nontechnical elements to improve medication safety in NICUs.

KW - hospital

KW - medication errors

KW - paediatrics

KW - prevention strategies

U2 - 10.1177/2042098618771541

DO - 10.1177/2042098618771541

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 30034776

AN - SCOPUS:85046632860

VL - 9

SP - 343

EP - 353

JO - Therapeutic Advances in Drug Safety

JF - Therapeutic Advances in Drug Safety

SN - 2042-0986

IS - 7

ER -