Prolonged parenteral nutrition after neonatal gastrointestinal surgery

a Danish experience

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskning

Resumé

INTRODUCTION: Long-term treatment with parenteral nutrition (PN) may be essential for survival in infants after neonatal gastrointestinal surgery. It seemed well indicated in a population-based study to estimate the need for long-term PN and to characterize the infants that received TPN with regard to diagnosis and clinical course.

METHODOLOGY: This study reviews the clinical course of infants with gastrointestinal disease (gastroschisis, intestinal atresia, omphalocele, volvulus, Hirschsprung's disease and necrotizing enterocolitis) with a prolonged need for parenteral nutrition in the Western part of Denmark over a period of 11 1/2 years.

RESULTS: A total of 21 patients with need for PN for 55 days or more due to gastrointestinal disease were registered with a cumulative hospital stay of 4462 days. The study showed a low incidence of long-term PN due to gastro-intestinal surgical illness with an incidence of approx 6.1 per 10(5) births per year. Gastroschisis and intestinal atresia were the most common primary diagnoses. Two groups of patients were identified: 1) six infants with short gut syndrome caused by major resections or atresia of the small intestine (less than 50 cm intestine) and 2) a larger group (n = 15) with no or only minor resection of the small bowel. The former group had a significantly longer hospital stay and a longer need for PN. The incidence of short bowel syndrome including six infants was 1.7 per 10(5) births per year.

CONCLUSIONS: Prolonged need for PN in infants operated for gastrointestinal disease was registered at a low frequency in the Western part of Denmark, most frequently caused by gastroschisis and intestinal atresia. The clinical course was characterized by repetitive problems of catheter replacements and septic episodes. The mortality due to conditions related to the gastrointestinal disease was 14% (3/21).

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftDanish medical bulletin
Vol/bind49
Udgave nummer3
Sider (fra-til)244-247
ISSN0907-8916
StatusUdgivet - 2002

Fingeraftryk

Gastrointestinal Diseases
Intestinal Atresia
Gastroschisis
Denmark
Length of Stay
Incidence
Short Bowel Syndrome
Umbilical Hernia
Intestinal Volvulus
Hirschsprung Disease
Necrotizing Enterocolitis
Intestines
Catheters
Population

Citer dette

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title = "Prolonged parenteral nutrition after neonatal gastrointestinal surgery: a Danish experience",
abstract = "INTRODUCTION: Long-term treatment with parenteral nutrition (PN) may be essential for survival in infants after neonatal gastrointestinal surgery. It seemed well indicated in a population-based study to estimate the need for long-term PN and to characterize the infants that received TPN with regard to diagnosis and clinical course.METHODOLOGY: This study reviews the clinical course of infants with gastrointestinal disease (gastroschisis, intestinal atresia, omphalocele, volvulus, Hirschsprung's disease and necrotizing enterocolitis) with a prolonged need for parenteral nutrition in the Western part of Denmark over a period of 11 1/2 years.RESULTS: A total of 21 patients with need for PN for 55 days or more due to gastrointestinal disease were registered with a cumulative hospital stay of 4462 days. The study showed a low incidence of long-term PN due to gastro-intestinal surgical illness with an incidence of approx 6.1 per 10(5) births per year. Gastroschisis and intestinal atresia were the most common primary diagnoses. Two groups of patients were identified: 1) six infants with short gut syndrome caused by major resections or atresia of the small intestine (less than 50 cm intestine) and 2) a larger group (n = 15) with no or only minor resection of the small bowel. The former group had a significantly longer hospital stay and a longer need for PN. The incidence of short bowel syndrome including six infants was 1.7 per 10(5) births per year.CONCLUSIONS: Prolonged need for PN in infants operated for gastrointestinal disease was registered at a low frequency in the Western part of Denmark, most frequently caused by gastroschisis and intestinal atresia. The clinical course was characterized by repetitive problems of catheter replacements and septic episodes. The mortality due to conditions related to the gastrointestinal disease was 14{\%} (3/21).",
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Prolonged parenteral nutrition after neonatal gastrointestinal surgery : a Danish experience. / Estmann , Anne; Qvist, Niels; Husby, Steffen.

I: Danish medical bulletin, Bind 49, Nr. 3, 2002, s. 244-247.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskning

TY - JOUR

T1 - Prolonged parenteral nutrition after neonatal gastrointestinal surgery

T2 - a Danish experience

AU - Estmann , Anne

AU - Qvist, Niels

AU - Husby, Steffen

PY - 2002

Y1 - 2002

N2 - INTRODUCTION: Long-term treatment with parenteral nutrition (PN) may be essential for survival in infants after neonatal gastrointestinal surgery. It seemed well indicated in a population-based study to estimate the need for long-term PN and to characterize the infants that received TPN with regard to diagnosis and clinical course.METHODOLOGY: This study reviews the clinical course of infants with gastrointestinal disease (gastroschisis, intestinal atresia, omphalocele, volvulus, Hirschsprung's disease and necrotizing enterocolitis) with a prolonged need for parenteral nutrition in the Western part of Denmark over a period of 11 1/2 years.RESULTS: A total of 21 patients with need for PN for 55 days or more due to gastrointestinal disease were registered with a cumulative hospital stay of 4462 days. The study showed a low incidence of long-term PN due to gastro-intestinal surgical illness with an incidence of approx 6.1 per 10(5) births per year. Gastroschisis and intestinal atresia were the most common primary diagnoses. Two groups of patients were identified: 1) six infants with short gut syndrome caused by major resections or atresia of the small intestine (less than 50 cm intestine) and 2) a larger group (n = 15) with no or only minor resection of the small bowel. The former group had a significantly longer hospital stay and a longer need for PN. The incidence of short bowel syndrome including six infants was 1.7 per 10(5) births per year.CONCLUSIONS: Prolonged need for PN in infants operated for gastrointestinal disease was registered at a low frequency in the Western part of Denmark, most frequently caused by gastroschisis and intestinal atresia. The clinical course was characterized by repetitive problems of catheter replacements and septic episodes. The mortality due to conditions related to the gastrointestinal disease was 14% (3/21).

AB - INTRODUCTION: Long-term treatment with parenteral nutrition (PN) may be essential for survival in infants after neonatal gastrointestinal surgery. It seemed well indicated in a population-based study to estimate the need for long-term PN and to characterize the infants that received TPN with regard to diagnosis and clinical course.METHODOLOGY: This study reviews the clinical course of infants with gastrointestinal disease (gastroschisis, intestinal atresia, omphalocele, volvulus, Hirschsprung's disease and necrotizing enterocolitis) with a prolonged need for parenteral nutrition in the Western part of Denmark over a period of 11 1/2 years.RESULTS: A total of 21 patients with need for PN for 55 days or more due to gastrointestinal disease were registered with a cumulative hospital stay of 4462 days. The study showed a low incidence of long-term PN due to gastro-intestinal surgical illness with an incidence of approx 6.1 per 10(5) births per year. Gastroschisis and intestinal atresia were the most common primary diagnoses. Two groups of patients were identified: 1) six infants with short gut syndrome caused by major resections or atresia of the small intestine (less than 50 cm intestine) and 2) a larger group (n = 15) with no or only minor resection of the small bowel. The former group had a significantly longer hospital stay and a longer need for PN. The incidence of short bowel syndrome including six infants was 1.7 per 10(5) births per year.CONCLUSIONS: Prolonged need for PN in infants operated for gastrointestinal disease was registered at a low frequency in the Western part of Denmark, most frequently caused by gastroschisis and intestinal atresia. The clinical course was characterized by repetitive problems of catheter replacements and septic episodes. The mortality due to conditions related to the gastrointestinal disease was 14% (3/21).

KW - Digestive System Surgical Procedures

KW - Humans

KW - Infant, Newborn

KW - Parenteral Nutrition

KW - Postoperative Care

KW - Postoperative Complications

KW - Reoperation

KW - Retrospective Studies

M3 - Journal article

VL - 49

SP - 244

EP - 247

JO - Danish Medical Journal

JF - Danish Medical Journal

SN - 1603-9629

IS - 3

ER -