Prolonged activation of virus-specific CD8+T cells after acute B19 infection.

Adiba Isa, Victoria Kasprowicz, Oscar Norbeck, Andrew Loughry, Katie Jeffery, Kristina Broliden, Paul Klenerman, Thomas Tolfvenstam, Paul Bowness

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

Udgivelsesdato: 2005-Dec
OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftPLoS Medicine
Vol/bind2
Udgave nummer12
Sider (fra-til)e343
ISSN1549-1277
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 1. dec. 2005

Fingeraftryk

Virus Activation
Perforin
Erythema Infectiosum
Human Parvovirus B19
Fetal Death
Joint Diseases
Cytomegalovirus Infections
Virus Diseases
Down-Regulation
Peptides

Citer dette

Isa, A., Kasprowicz, V., Norbeck, O., Loughry, A., Jeffery, K., Broliden, K., ... Bowness, P. (2005). Prolonged activation of virus-specific CD8+T cells after acute B19 infection. PLoS Medicine, 2(12), e343. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pmed.0020343
Isa, Adiba ; Kasprowicz, Victoria ; Norbeck, Oscar ; Loughry, Andrew ; Jeffery, Katie ; Broliden, Kristina ; Klenerman, Paul ; Tolfvenstam, Thomas ; Bowness, Paul. / Prolonged activation of virus-specific CD8+T cells after acute B19 infection. I: PLoS Medicine. 2005 ; Bind 2, Nr. 12. s. e343.
@article{f6a0e8403d1911dda26c000ea68e967b,
title = "Prolonged activation of virus-specific CD8+T cells after acute B19 infection.",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: Human parvovirus B19 (B19) is a ubiquitous and clinically significant pathogen, causing erythema infectiosum, arthropathy, transient aplastic crisis, and intrauterine fetal death. The phenotype of CD8+ T cells in acute B19 infection has not been studied previously. METHODS AND FINDINGS: The number and phenotype of B19-specific CD8+ T cell responses during and after acute adult infection was studied using HLA-peptide multimeric complexes. Surprisingly, these responses increased in magnitude over the first year post-infection despite resolution of clinical symptoms and control of viraemia, with T cell populations specific for individual epitopes comprising up to 4{\%} of CD8+ T cells. B19-specific T cells developed and maintained an activated CD38+ phenotype, with strong expression of perforin and CD57 and downregulation of CD28 and CD27. These cells possessed strong effector function and intact proliferative capacity. Individuals tested many years after infection exhibited lower frequencies of B19-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes, typically 0.05{\%}-0.5{\%} of CD8+ T cells, which were perforin, CD38, and CCR7 low. CONCLUSION: This is the first example to our knowledge of an {"}acute{"} human viral infection inducing a persistent activated CD8+ T cell response. The likely explanation--analogous to that for cytomegalovirus infection--is that this persistent response is due to low-level antigen exposure. CD8+ T cells may contribute to the long-term control of this significant pathogen and should be considered during vaccine development.",
keywords = "Acute Disease, Antigens, CD27, Antigens, CD28, Antigens, CD38, Antigens, CD57, CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes, Down-Regulation, Erythema Infectiosum, Humans, Parvovirus B19, Human, Phenotype",
author = "Adiba Isa and Victoria Kasprowicz and Oscar Norbeck and Andrew Loughry and Katie Jeffery and Kristina Broliden and Paul Klenerman and Thomas Tolfvenstam and Paul Bowness",
year = "2005",
month = "12",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1371/journal.pmed.0020343",
language = "English",
volume = "2",
pages = "e343",
journal = "PLoS Medicine",
issn = "1549-1277",
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Isa, A, Kasprowicz, V, Norbeck, O, Loughry, A, Jeffery, K, Broliden, K, Klenerman, P, Tolfvenstam, T & Bowness, P 2005, 'Prolonged activation of virus-specific CD8+T cells after acute B19 infection.', PLoS Medicine, bind 2, nr. 12, s. e343. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pmed.0020343

Prolonged activation of virus-specific CD8+T cells after acute B19 infection. / Isa, Adiba; Kasprowicz, Victoria; Norbeck, Oscar; Loughry, Andrew; Jeffery, Katie; Broliden, Kristina; Klenerman, Paul; Tolfvenstam, Thomas; Bowness, Paul.

I: PLoS Medicine, Bind 2, Nr. 12, 01.12.2005, s. e343.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Prolonged activation of virus-specific CD8+T cells after acute B19 infection.

AU - Isa, Adiba

AU - Kasprowicz, Victoria

AU - Norbeck, Oscar

AU - Loughry, Andrew

AU - Jeffery, Katie

AU - Broliden, Kristina

AU - Klenerman, Paul

AU - Tolfvenstam, Thomas

AU - Bowness, Paul

PY - 2005/12/1

Y1 - 2005/12/1

N2 - BACKGROUND: Human parvovirus B19 (B19) is a ubiquitous and clinically significant pathogen, causing erythema infectiosum, arthropathy, transient aplastic crisis, and intrauterine fetal death. The phenotype of CD8+ T cells in acute B19 infection has not been studied previously. METHODS AND FINDINGS: The number and phenotype of B19-specific CD8+ T cell responses during and after acute adult infection was studied using HLA-peptide multimeric complexes. Surprisingly, these responses increased in magnitude over the first year post-infection despite resolution of clinical symptoms and control of viraemia, with T cell populations specific for individual epitopes comprising up to 4% of CD8+ T cells. B19-specific T cells developed and maintained an activated CD38+ phenotype, with strong expression of perforin and CD57 and downregulation of CD28 and CD27. These cells possessed strong effector function and intact proliferative capacity. Individuals tested many years after infection exhibited lower frequencies of B19-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes, typically 0.05%-0.5% of CD8+ T cells, which were perforin, CD38, and CCR7 low. CONCLUSION: This is the first example to our knowledge of an "acute" human viral infection inducing a persistent activated CD8+ T cell response. The likely explanation--analogous to that for cytomegalovirus infection--is that this persistent response is due to low-level antigen exposure. CD8+ T cells may contribute to the long-term control of this significant pathogen and should be considered during vaccine development.

AB - BACKGROUND: Human parvovirus B19 (B19) is a ubiquitous and clinically significant pathogen, causing erythema infectiosum, arthropathy, transient aplastic crisis, and intrauterine fetal death. The phenotype of CD8+ T cells in acute B19 infection has not been studied previously. METHODS AND FINDINGS: The number and phenotype of B19-specific CD8+ T cell responses during and after acute adult infection was studied using HLA-peptide multimeric complexes. Surprisingly, these responses increased in magnitude over the first year post-infection despite resolution of clinical symptoms and control of viraemia, with T cell populations specific for individual epitopes comprising up to 4% of CD8+ T cells. B19-specific T cells developed and maintained an activated CD38+ phenotype, with strong expression of perforin and CD57 and downregulation of CD28 and CD27. These cells possessed strong effector function and intact proliferative capacity. Individuals tested many years after infection exhibited lower frequencies of B19-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes, typically 0.05%-0.5% of CD8+ T cells, which were perforin, CD38, and CCR7 low. CONCLUSION: This is the first example to our knowledge of an "acute" human viral infection inducing a persistent activated CD8+ T cell response. The likely explanation--analogous to that for cytomegalovirus infection--is that this persistent response is due to low-level antigen exposure. CD8+ T cells may contribute to the long-term control of this significant pathogen and should be considered during vaccine development.

KW - Acute Disease

KW - Antigens, CD27

KW - Antigens, CD28

KW - Antigens, CD38

KW - Antigens, CD57

KW - CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes

KW - Down-Regulation

KW - Erythema Infectiosum

KW - Humans

KW - Parvovirus B19, Human

KW - Phenotype

U2 - 10.1371/journal.pmed.0020343

DO - 10.1371/journal.pmed.0020343

M3 - Journal article

VL - 2

SP - e343

JO - PLoS Medicine

JF - PLoS Medicine

SN - 1549-1277

IS - 12

ER -

Isa A, Kasprowicz V, Norbeck O, Loughry A, Jeffery K, Broliden K et al. Prolonged activation of virus-specific CD8+T cells after acute B19 infection. PLoS Medicine. 2005 dec 1;2(12):e343. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pmed.0020343