Progress and Feminist Literary Criticism

The "New Eras" of Nadine Gordimer

Publikation: Bidrag til bog/antologi/rapport/konference-proceedingBidrag til bog/antologiForskningpeer review

Resumé

It has often been suggested that reading Nadine Gordimer’s novels and stories chronologically allows the reader to track the development of her opposition to apartheid, and feminist critics have tended to read her depictions of women as out of step with this increasing radicalism of her antiracism. This chapter argues that there are moments in Gordimer’s fiction which self-consciously associate literariness and the act of writing with the disruption of teleological models of political progress – that is, the texts challenge the interpretative frames which have been used to read them. Through this it asks whether the particular qualities of literary writing might contribute to our understanding of those uneasy political histories (like that, perhaps, of feminist English Studies itself) in which predictable development is disrupted.
OriginalsprogEngelsk
TitelInfluence and Inheritance in Feminist English Studies
RedaktørerEmily J. Hogg, Clara Jones
Udgivelses stedHoundmills, Basingstoke
ForlagPalgrave Macmillan
Publikationsdato2015
Sider49-65
Kapitel4
ISBN (Trykt)978-1-137-49750-5
ISBN (Elektronisk)978-1-349-50512-8
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 2015
Udgivet eksterntJa

Fingeraftryk

Literary Criticism
Literary Writing
Radicalism
English Studies
Political History
Disruption
Apartheid
Reader
Fiction
Novel
Anti-racism
Literariness

Citer dette

Hogg, E. J. (2015). Progress and Feminist Literary Criticism: The "New Eras" of Nadine Gordimer. I E. J. Hogg, & C. Jones (red.), Influence and Inheritance in Feminist English Studies (s. 49-65). Houndmills, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan. https://doi.org/10.1057/9781137497505.0001
Hogg, Emily J. / Progress and Feminist Literary Criticism : The "New Eras" of Nadine Gordimer. Influence and Inheritance in Feminist English Studies. red. / Emily J. Hogg ; Clara Jones. Houndmills, Basingstoke : Palgrave Macmillan, 2015. s. 49-65
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Hogg, EJ 2015, Progress and Feminist Literary Criticism: The "New Eras" of Nadine Gordimer. i EJ Hogg & C Jones (red), Influence and Inheritance in Feminist English Studies. Palgrave Macmillan, Houndmills, Basingstoke, s. 49-65. https://doi.org/10.1057/9781137497505.0001

Progress and Feminist Literary Criticism : The "New Eras" of Nadine Gordimer. / Hogg, Emily J.

Influence and Inheritance in Feminist English Studies. red. / Emily J. Hogg; Clara Jones. Houndmills, Basingstoke : Palgrave Macmillan, 2015. s. 49-65.

Publikation: Bidrag til bog/antologi/rapport/konference-proceedingBidrag til bog/antologiForskningpeer review

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Hogg EJ. Progress and Feminist Literary Criticism: The "New Eras" of Nadine Gordimer. I Hogg EJ, Jones C, red., Influence and Inheritance in Feminist English Studies. Houndmills, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan. 2015. s. 49-65 https://doi.org/10.1057/9781137497505.0001