Priority classes and weighted constrained equal awards rules for the claims problem

Karol Szwagrzak

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

We revisit the “claims problem” (O'Neill, 1982), where a group of individuals have claims on a resource but there is not enough of it to honor all of the claims. We characterize the rules satisfying three well-known invariance axioms: consistency, composition up, and claims truncation invariance. They are priority-augmented versions of the standard weighted constrained equal awards rules, also known as weighted gains methods (Moulin, 2000): individuals are sorted into priority classes; the resource is distributed among the individuals in the first priority class using a weighted constrained equal awards rule; if some of the resource is left over, then it is distributed among the individuals in the second priority class, again using a weighted constrained equal awards rule; the distribution carries on in this way until the resource is exhausted. Our characterization extends to a generalized version of the claims problem where there are multiple divisible and indivisible resources and individuals have claims on each of these.
OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftJournal of Economic Theory
Vol/bind160
Sider (fra-til)36-55
ISSN0022-0531
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 2015

Fingeraftryk

Claims problems
Constrained equal awards rule
Resources
Invariance
Axioms

Citer dette

@article{d5062e11757341929dcdaa118f41e9ba,
title = "Priority classes and weighted constrained equal awards rules for the claims problem",
abstract = "We revisit the “claims problem” (O'Neill, 1982), where a group of individuals have claims on a resource but there is not enough of it to honor all of the claims. We characterize the rules satisfying three well-known invariance axioms: consistency, composition up, and claims truncation invariance. They are priority-augmented versions of the standard weighted constrained equal awards rules, also known as weighted gains methods (Moulin, 2000): individuals are sorted into priority classes; the resource is distributed among the individuals in the first priority class using a weighted constrained equal awards rule; if some of the resource is left over, then it is distributed among the individuals in the second priority class, again using a weighted constrained equal awards rule; the distribution carries on in this way until the resource is exhausted. Our characterization extends to a generalized version of the claims problem where there are multiple divisible and indivisible resources and individuals have claims on each of these.",
author = "Karol Szwagrzak",
year = "2015",
doi = "10.1016/j.jet.2015.08.008",
language = "English",
volume = "160",
pages = "36--55",
journal = "Journal of Economic Theory",
issn = "0022-0531",
publisher = "Heinemann",

}

Priority classes and weighted constrained equal awards rules for the claims problem. / Szwagrzak, Karol.

I: Journal of Economic Theory, Bind 160, 2015, s. 36-55.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Priority classes and weighted constrained equal awards rules for the claims problem

AU - Szwagrzak, Karol

PY - 2015

Y1 - 2015

N2 - We revisit the “claims problem” (O'Neill, 1982), where a group of individuals have claims on a resource but there is not enough of it to honor all of the claims. We characterize the rules satisfying three well-known invariance axioms: consistency, composition up, and claims truncation invariance. They are priority-augmented versions of the standard weighted constrained equal awards rules, also known as weighted gains methods (Moulin, 2000): individuals are sorted into priority classes; the resource is distributed among the individuals in the first priority class using a weighted constrained equal awards rule; if some of the resource is left over, then it is distributed among the individuals in the second priority class, again using a weighted constrained equal awards rule; the distribution carries on in this way until the resource is exhausted. Our characterization extends to a generalized version of the claims problem where there are multiple divisible and indivisible resources and individuals have claims on each of these.

AB - We revisit the “claims problem” (O'Neill, 1982), where a group of individuals have claims on a resource but there is not enough of it to honor all of the claims. We characterize the rules satisfying three well-known invariance axioms: consistency, composition up, and claims truncation invariance. They are priority-augmented versions of the standard weighted constrained equal awards rules, also known as weighted gains methods (Moulin, 2000): individuals are sorted into priority classes; the resource is distributed among the individuals in the first priority class using a weighted constrained equal awards rule; if some of the resource is left over, then it is distributed among the individuals in the second priority class, again using a weighted constrained equal awards rule; the distribution carries on in this way until the resource is exhausted. Our characterization extends to a generalized version of the claims problem where there are multiple divisible and indivisible resources and individuals have claims on each of these.

U2 - 10.1016/j.jet.2015.08.008

DO - 10.1016/j.jet.2015.08.008

M3 - Journal article

VL - 160

SP - 36

EP - 55

JO - Journal of Economic Theory

JF - Journal of Economic Theory

SN - 0022-0531

ER -