Prevalence of impaired glucose tolerance and other types of dysglycaemia among young twins and singletons in Guinea-Bissau

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BACKGROUND: Twins may be at increased risk of dysglycaemic disorders due to adverse fetal conditions. Data from Africa regarding this association is limited. We studied impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and other types of dysglycemia among twins and singletons in Guinea-Bissau.

METHODS: The study was conducted from February 2011 until March 2012 at the Bandim Health Project, a health and demographic surveillance system site in the capital Bissau. Twins (n = 209) and singletons (n = 182) were recruited from a previously established cohort. Oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTT) were performed, along with anthropometrics and collection of clinical and dietary data.

RESULTS: Median age was 16.6 and 14.2 years between twins and singletons, respectively (P = 0.08). Mean birth weight was 2410 vs. 3090 g, respectively (P < 0.001). Twins had higher median fasting- and two hour capillary plasma glucose, 5.4(3.2-8.2) vs. 5.0(3.2-11.5) mmol/L (P < 0.001) and 6.8(3.4-11.3) vs. 6.2(3.2-12.1) mmol/L (P < 0.001), respectively, compared to singletons. The prevalence of IGT was 2.5 % (5/209) vs. 3.5 % (6/182) (RR = 0.73, 95 % CI: 0.20-2.64). 12 % (25/209) of twins had impaired fasting glucose (IFG), compared to 3.5 % (6/182) of singletons (3.63, 1.53-8.62). Dysglycemia (IGT and/or IFG or overt diabetes) was found in 17 % (35/209) vs. 9 % (16/182) (1.90, 1.08-3.37), respectively.

CONCLUSIONS: Twins had higher glucose levels in both the fasting and postprandial state. This may indicate a detrimental effect of the twin fetal environment on glucose metabolism later in life, a result contrary to Scandinavian register studies. The IGT burden was low in this young age group and the risk was similar in twins and singletons.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
Artikelnummer46
TidsskriftBMC Endocrine Disorders
Vol/bind16
Udgave nummer1
Antal sider10
ISSN1472-6823
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 2016

Fingeraftryk

Guinea-Bissau
Glucose Intolerance
Fasting
Health
Glucose Tolerance Test
Age Groups

Citer dette

@article{f8496b2c79084038b443549400e0b705,
title = "Prevalence of impaired glucose tolerance and other types of dysglycaemia among young twins and singletons in Guinea-Bissau",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: Twins may be at increased risk of dysglycaemic disorders due to adverse fetal conditions. Data from Africa regarding this association is limited. We studied impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and other types of dysglycemia among twins and singletons in Guinea-Bissau.METHODS: The study was conducted from February 2011 until March 2012 at the Bandim Health Project, a health and demographic surveillance system site in the capital Bissau. Twins (n = 209) and singletons (n = 182) were recruited from a previously established cohort. Oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTT) were performed, along with anthropometrics and collection of clinical and dietary data.RESULTS: Median age was 16.6 and 14.2 years between twins and singletons, respectively (P = 0.08). Mean birth weight was 2410 vs. 3090 g, respectively (P < 0.001). Twins had higher median fasting- and two hour capillary plasma glucose, 5.4(3.2-8.2) vs. 5.0(3.2-11.5) mmol/L (P < 0.001) and 6.8(3.4-11.3) vs. 6.2(3.2-12.1) mmol/L (P < 0.001), respectively, compared to singletons. The prevalence of IGT was 2.5 {\%} (5/209) vs. 3.5 {\%} (6/182) (RR = 0.73, 95 {\%} CI: 0.20-2.64). 12 {\%} (25/209) of twins had impaired fasting glucose (IFG), compared to 3.5 {\%} (6/182) of singletons (3.63, 1.53-8.62). Dysglycemia (IGT and/or IFG or overt diabetes) was found in 17 {\%} (35/209) vs. 9 {\%} (16/182) (1.90, 1.08-3.37), respectively.CONCLUSIONS: Twins had higher glucose levels in both the fasting and postprandial state. This may indicate a detrimental effect of the twin fetal environment on glucose metabolism later in life, a result contrary to Scandinavian register studies. The IGT burden was low in this young age group and the risk was similar in twins and singletons.",
keywords = "Journal Article",
author = "{Egegaard Hennild}, Ditte and Morten Bjerregaard-Andersen and Joaqu{\'i}m, {Luis Carlos} and Kaare Christensen and Morten Sodemann and Henning Beck-Nielsen and Jensen, {Dorte M{\o}ller}",
year = "2016",
doi = "10.1186/s12902-016-0126-6",
language = "English",
volume = "16",
journal = "B M C Endocrine Disorders",
issn = "1472-6823",
publisher = "BioMed Central",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Prevalence of impaired glucose tolerance and other types of dysglycaemia among young twins and singletons in Guinea-Bissau

AU - Egegaard Hennild, Ditte

AU - Bjerregaard-Andersen, Morten

AU - Joaquím, Luis Carlos

AU - Christensen, Kaare

AU - Sodemann, Morten

AU - Beck-Nielsen, Henning

AU - Jensen, Dorte Møller

PY - 2016

Y1 - 2016

N2 - BACKGROUND: Twins may be at increased risk of dysglycaemic disorders due to adverse fetal conditions. Data from Africa regarding this association is limited. We studied impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and other types of dysglycemia among twins and singletons in Guinea-Bissau.METHODS: The study was conducted from February 2011 until March 2012 at the Bandim Health Project, a health and demographic surveillance system site in the capital Bissau. Twins (n = 209) and singletons (n = 182) were recruited from a previously established cohort. Oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTT) were performed, along with anthropometrics and collection of clinical and dietary data.RESULTS: Median age was 16.6 and 14.2 years between twins and singletons, respectively (P = 0.08). Mean birth weight was 2410 vs. 3090 g, respectively (P < 0.001). Twins had higher median fasting- and two hour capillary plasma glucose, 5.4(3.2-8.2) vs. 5.0(3.2-11.5) mmol/L (P < 0.001) and 6.8(3.4-11.3) vs. 6.2(3.2-12.1) mmol/L (P < 0.001), respectively, compared to singletons. The prevalence of IGT was 2.5 % (5/209) vs. 3.5 % (6/182) (RR = 0.73, 95 % CI: 0.20-2.64). 12 % (25/209) of twins had impaired fasting glucose (IFG), compared to 3.5 % (6/182) of singletons (3.63, 1.53-8.62). Dysglycemia (IGT and/or IFG or overt diabetes) was found in 17 % (35/209) vs. 9 % (16/182) (1.90, 1.08-3.37), respectively.CONCLUSIONS: Twins had higher glucose levels in both the fasting and postprandial state. This may indicate a detrimental effect of the twin fetal environment on glucose metabolism later in life, a result contrary to Scandinavian register studies. The IGT burden was low in this young age group and the risk was similar in twins and singletons.

AB - BACKGROUND: Twins may be at increased risk of dysglycaemic disorders due to adverse fetal conditions. Data from Africa regarding this association is limited. We studied impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and other types of dysglycemia among twins and singletons in Guinea-Bissau.METHODS: The study was conducted from February 2011 until March 2012 at the Bandim Health Project, a health and demographic surveillance system site in the capital Bissau. Twins (n = 209) and singletons (n = 182) were recruited from a previously established cohort. Oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTT) were performed, along with anthropometrics and collection of clinical and dietary data.RESULTS: Median age was 16.6 and 14.2 years between twins and singletons, respectively (P = 0.08). Mean birth weight was 2410 vs. 3090 g, respectively (P < 0.001). Twins had higher median fasting- and two hour capillary plasma glucose, 5.4(3.2-8.2) vs. 5.0(3.2-11.5) mmol/L (P < 0.001) and 6.8(3.4-11.3) vs. 6.2(3.2-12.1) mmol/L (P < 0.001), respectively, compared to singletons. The prevalence of IGT was 2.5 % (5/209) vs. 3.5 % (6/182) (RR = 0.73, 95 % CI: 0.20-2.64). 12 % (25/209) of twins had impaired fasting glucose (IFG), compared to 3.5 % (6/182) of singletons (3.63, 1.53-8.62). Dysglycemia (IGT and/or IFG or overt diabetes) was found in 17 % (35/209) vs. 9 % (16/182) (1.90, 1.08-3.37), respectively.CONCLUSIONS: Twins had higher glucose levels in both the fasting and postprandial state. This may indicate a detrimental effect of the twin fetal environment on glucose metabolism later in life, a result contrary to Scandinavian register studies. The IGT burden was low in this young age group and the risk was similar in twins and singletons.

KW - Journal Article

U2 - 10.1186/s12902-016-0126-6

DO - 10.1186/s12902-016-0126-6

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 27491662

VL - 16

JO - B M C Endocrine Disorders

JF - B M C Endocrine Disorders

SN - 1472-6823

IS - 1

M1 - 46

ER -