Prevalence and prognosis of acutely ill patients with organ failure at arrival to hospital

A systematic review

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftReviewForskningpeer review

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Resumé

Introduction Patients in an emergency department are diverse. Some are more seriously ill than others and some even arrive in multi-organ failure. Knowledge of the prevalence of organ failure and its prognosis in unselected patients is important from a diagnostic, hospital planning, and from a quality evaluation point of view, but is not reported systematically. Objectives To analyse the prevalence and prognosis of new onset organ failure in unselected acute patients at arrival to hospital. Methods A systematic review of studies of prevalence and prognosis of acutely ill patients with organ failure at arrival to hospital. We searched PubMed, Cochrane Library, Embase and Cinahl, and read references in included studies. Two authors decided independently on study eligibility and extracted data. Results were summarised qualitatively. Results Four studies were included with a total of 678,960 patients. The number of different organ failures reported in the studies ranged from one to six, and the settings were emergency departments and wards. The definitions of organ failure varied between studies. The prevalence of organ failure was 7%, 14%, 14%, and 23%, and in-hospital mortality was 5%, 11% and 15% respectively. The relative risk of in-hospital mortality for patients with organ failure compared to patients without organ failure varied from 2.58 to 8.65. Numbers of organ failures per 1,000 visits varied from 71 to 256. Conclusion The results of this review indicate that clinicians have good reasons to be alert when a patient arrives to the emergency department; as a state of organ failure seems both frequent and highly severe. However, most studies identified were performed in patients after a diagnosis was established, and only very few studies were performed in unselected patients.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
Artikelnummere0206610
TidsskriftPLOS ONE
Vol/bind13
Udgave nummer11
Antal sider13
ISSN1932-6203
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 1. nov. 2018

Fingeraftryk

systematic review
prognosis
Hospital Emergency Service
Hospital Mortality
Hospital Planning
Planning
relative risk
PubMed
Libraries
Cross-Sectional Studies
planning

Citer dette

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title = "Prevalence and prognosis of acutely ill patients with organ failure at arrival to hospital: A systematic review",
abstract = "Introduction Patients in an emergency department are diverse. Some are more seriously ill than others and some even arrive in multi-organ failure. Knowledge of the prevalence of organ failure and its prognosis in unselected patients is important from a diagnostic, hospital planning, and from a quality evaluation point of view, but is not reported systematically. Objectives To analyse the prevalence and prognosis of new onset organ failure in unselected acute patients at arrival to hospital. Methods A systematic review of studies of prevalence and prognosis of acutely ill patients with organ failure at arrival to hospital. We searched PubMed, Cochrane Library, Embase and Cinahl, and read references in included studies. Two authors decided independently on study eligibility and extracted data. Results were summarised qualitatively. Results Four studies were included with a total of 678,960 patients. The number of different organ failures reported in the studies ranged from one to six, and the settings were emergency departments and wards. The definitions of organ failure varied between studies. The prevalence of organ failure was 7{\%}, 14{\%}, 14{\%}, and 23{\%}, and in-hospital mortality was 5{\%}, 11{\%} and 15{\%} respectively. The relative risk of in-hospital mortality for patients with organ failure compared to patients without organ failure varied from 2.58 to 8.65. Numbers of organ failures per 1,000 visits varied from 71 to 256. Conclusion The results of this review indicate that clinicians have good reasons to be alert when a patient arrives to the emergency department; as a state of organ failure seems both frequent and highly severe. However, most studies identified were performed in patients after a diagnosis was established, and only very few studies were performed in unselected patients.",
author = "Pedersen, {Peter Bank} and Asbj{\o}rn Hrobjartsson and Nielsen, {Daniel Lykke} and Henriksen, {Daniel Pilsgaard} and Mikkel Brabrand and Lassen, {Annmarie Touborg}",
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Prevalence and prognosis of acutely ill patients with organ failure at arrival to hospital : A systematic review. / Pedersen, Peter Bank; Hrobjartsson, Asbjørn; Nielsen, Daniel Lykke; Henriksen, Daniel Pilsgaard; Brabrand, Mikkel; Lassen, Annmarie Touborg.

I: PLOS ONE, Bind 13, Nr. 11, e0206610, 01.11.2018.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftReviewForskningpeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Prevalence and prognosis of acutely ill patients with organ failure at arrival to hospital

T2 - A systematic review

AU - Pedersen, Peter Bank

AU - Hrobjartsson, Asbjørn

AU - Nielsen, Daniel Lykke

AU - Henriksen, Daniel Pilsgaard

AU - Brabrand, Mikkel

AU - Lassen, Annmarie Touborg

PY - 2018/11/1

Y1 - 2018/11/1

N2 - Introduction Patients in an emergency department are diverse. Some are more seriously ill than others and some even arrive in multi-organ failure. Knowledge of the prevalence of organ failure and its prognosis in unselected patients is important from a diagnostic, hospital planning, and from a quality evaluation point of view, but is not reported systematically. Objectives To analyse the prevalence and prognosis of new onset organ failure in unselected acute patients at arrival to hospital. Methods A systematic review of studies of prevalence and prognosis of acutely ill patients with organ failure at arrival to hospital. We searched PubMed, Cochrane Library, Embase and Cinahl, and read references in included studies. Two authors decided independently on study eligibility and extracted data. Results were summarised qualitatively. Results Four studies were included with a total of 678,960 patients. The number of different organ failures reported in the studies ranged from one to six, and the settings were emergency departments and wards. The definitions of organ failure varied between studies. The prevalence of organ failure was 7%, 14%, 14%, and 23%, and in-hospital mortality was 5%, 11% and 15% respectively. The relative risk of in-hospital mortality for patients with organ failure compared to patients without organ failure varied from 2.58 to 8.65. Numbers of organ failures per 1,000 visits varied from 71 to 256. Conclusion The results of this review indicate that clinicians have good reasons to be alert when a patient arrives to the emergency department; as a state of organ failure seems both frequent and highly severe. However, most studies identified were performed in patients after a diagnosis was established, and only very few studies were performed in unselected patients.

AB - Introduction Patients in an emergency department are diverse. Some are more seriously ill than others and some even arrive in multi-organ failure. Knowledge of the prevalence of organ failure and its prognosis in unselected patients is important from a diagnostic, hospital planning, and from a quality evaluation point of view, but is not reported systematically. Objectives To analyse the prevalence and prognosis of new onset organ failure in unselected acute patients at arrival to hospital. Methods A systematic review of studies of prevalence and prognosis of acutely ill patients with organ failure at arrival to hospital. We searched PubMed, Cochrane Library, Embase and Cinahl, and read references in included studies. Two authors decided independently on study eligibility and extracted data. Results were summarised qualitatively. Results Four studies were included with a total of 678,960 patients. The number of different organ failures reported in the studies ranged from one to six, and the settings were emergency departments and wards. The definitions of organ failure varied between studies. The prevalence of organ failure was 7%, 14%, 14%, and 23%, and in-hospital mortality was 5%, 11% and 15% respectively. The relative risk of in-hospital mortality for patients with organ failure compared to patients without organ failure varied from 2.58 to 8.65. Numbers of organ failures per 1,000 visits varied from 71 to 256. Conclusion The results of this review indicate that clinicians have good reasons to be alert when a patient arrives to the emergency department; as a state of organ failure seems both frequent and highly severe. However, most studies identified were performed in patients after a diagnosis was established, and only very few studies were performed in unselected patients.

U2 - 10.1371/journal.pone.0206610

DO - 10.1371/journal.pone.0206610

M3 - Review

VL - 13

JO - P L o S One

JF - P L o S One

SN - 1932-6203

IS - 11

M1 - e0206610

ER -