Prevalence and potential risk factors for gastrointestinal parasitic infections in children in urban Bissau, Guinea-Bissau

Sebastian von Huth, Poul-Erik Kofoed, Uffe Holmskov*

*Kontaktforfatter for dette arbejde

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

BACKGROUND: Gastrointestinal (GI) parasitic infections cause significant morbidity and mortality in tropical and subtropical countries. We aimed to investigate the prevalence of GI parasitic infections in children from Bissau, Guinea-Bissau and to identify the possible risk factors for these infections.

METHODS: We performed an observational study on two comparable cohorts of children 2-15 y of age: one study covering health care-seeking children (n=748) and one study covering children from the background population (n=851). A total of 1274 faecal samples from the two cohorts were investigated for parasites by microscopy and the risk factors for infection were identified by logistic regression.

RESULTS: Intestinal parasitic infections were found in 54.8% of health care-seeking children and 55.5% of children from the background population. Helminth infections were more common among health care-seeking children and were mainly due to hookworms. Pathogenic protozoa included Entamoeba histolytica/dispar and Giardia lamblia. The risk factors for infections included increasing age, household crowding and poor sanitation and water supply.

CONCLUSIONS: We found a high prevalence of intestinal parasites among both health care-seeking children and children from the background population. Compared with previous studies, we found a decreasing prevalence of intestinal helminths. This study further identifies potential risk factors for infections, including inadequate sanitation and water supply.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftTransactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene
Vol/bind113
Udgave nummer9
Sider (fra-til)545-554
ISSN0035-9203
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 6. sep. 2019

Fingeraftryk

Guinea-Bissau
Parasitic Diseases
Delivery of Health Care
Sanitation
Water Supply
Helminths
Parasites
Population
Giardia lamblia
Entamoeba histolytica
Crowding
Microscopy
Logistic Models

Citer dette

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title = "Prevalence and potential risk factors for gastrointestinal parasitic infections in children in urban Bissau, Guinea-Bissau",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: Gastrointestinal (GI) parasitic infections cause significant morbidity and mortality in tropical and subtropical countries. We aimed to investigate the prevalence of GI parasitic infections in children from Bissau, Guinea-Bissau and to identify the possible risk factors for these infections.METHODS: We performed an observational study on two comparable cohorts of children 2-15 y of age: one study covering health care-seeking children (n=748) and one study covering children from the background population (n=851). A total of 1274 faecal samples from the two cohorts were investigated for parasites by microscopy and the risk factors for infection were identified by logistic regression.RESULTS: Intestinal parasitic infections were found in 54.8{\%} of health care-seeking children and 55.5{\%} of children from the background population. Helminth infections were more common among health care-seeking children and were mainly due to hookworms. Pathogenic protozoa included Entamoeba histolytica/dispar and Giardia lamblia. The risk factors for infections included increasing age, household crowding and poor sanitation and water supply.CONCLUSIONS: We found a high prevalence of intestinal parasites among both health care-seeking children and children from the background population. Compared with previous studies, we found a decreasing prevalence of intestinal helminths. This study further identifies potential risk factors for infections, including inadequate sanitation and water supply.",
keywords = "Guinea-Bissau, helminthiasis, neglected diseases, parasitic diseases, parasitology, protozoan infections",
author = "{von Huth}, Sebastian and Poul-Erik Kofoed and Uffe Holmskov",
note = "{\circledC} The Author(s) 2019. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.",
year = "2019",
month = "9",
day = "6",
doi = "10.1093/trstmh/trz032",
language = "English",
volume = "113",
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Prevalence and potential risk factors for gastrointestinal parasitic infections in children in urban Bissau, Guinea-Bissau. / von Huth, Sebastian; Kofoed, Poul-Erik; Holmskov, Uffe.

I: Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, Bind 113, Nr. 9, 06.09.2019, s. 545-554.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Prevalence and potential risk factors for gastrointestinal parasitic infections in children in urban Bissau, Guinea-Bissau

AU - von Huth, Sebastian

AU - Kofoed, Poul-Erik

AU - Holmskov, Uffe

N1 - © The Author(s) 2019. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

PY - 2019/9/6

Y1 - 2019/9/6

N2 - BACKGROUND: Gastrointestinal (GI) parasitic infections cause significant morbidity and mortality in tropical and subtropical countries. We aimed to investigate the prevalence of GI parasitic infections in children from Bissau, Guinea-Bissau and to identify the possible risk factors for these infections.METHODS: We performed an observational study on two comparable cohorts of children 2-15 y of age: one study covering health care-seeking children (n=748) and one study covering children from the background population (n=851). A total of 1274 faecal samples from the two cohorts were investigated for parasites by microscopy and the risk factors for infection were identified by logistic regression.RESULTS: Intestinal parasitic infections were found in 54.8% of health care-seeking children and 55.5% of children from the background population. Helminth infections were more common among health care-seeking children and were mainly due to hookworms. Pathogenic protozoa included Entamoeba histolytica/dispar and Giardia lamblia. The risk factors for infections included increasing age, household crowding and poor sanitation and water supply.CONCLUSIONS: We found a high prevalence of intestinal parasites among both health care-seeking children and children from the background population. Compared with previous studies, we found a decreasing prevalence of intestinal helminths. This study further identifies potential risk factors for infections, including inadequate sanitation and water supply.

AB - BACKGROUND: Gastrointestinal (GI) parasitic infections cause significant morbidity and mortality in tropical and subtropical countries. We aimed to investigate the prevalence of GI parasitic infections in children from Bissau, Guinea-Bissau and to identify the possible risk factors for these infections.METHODS: We performed an observational study on two comparable cohorts of children 2-15 y of age: one study covering health care-seeking children (n=748) and one study covering children from the background population (n=851). A total of 1274 faecal samples from the two cohorts were investigated for parasites by microscopy and the risk factors for infection were identified by logistic regression.RESULTS: Intestinal parasitic infections were found in 54.8% of health care-seeking children and 55.5% of children from the background population. Helminth infections were more common among health care-seeking children and were mainly due to hookworms. Pathogenic protozoa included Entamoeba histolytica/dispar and Giardia lamblia. The risk factors for infections included increasing age, household crowding and poor sanitation and water supply.CONCLUSIONS: We found a high prevalence of intestinal parasites among both health care-seeking children and children from the background population. Compared with previous studies, we found a decreasing prevalence of intestinal helminths. This study further identifies potential risk factors for infections, including inadequate sanitation and water supply.

KW - Guinea-Bissau

KW - helminthiasis

KW - neglected diseases

KW - parasitic diseases

KW - parasitology

KW - protozoan infections

U2 - 10.1093/trstmh/trz032

DO - 10.1093/trstmh/trz032

M3 - Journal article

VL - 113

SP - 545

EP - 554

JO - Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene

JF - Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene

SN - 0035-9203

IS - 9

ER -