Prevalence and antibiotic sensitivity of Danish versus other European bacterial isolates from intensive care and hematology/oncology units

A Fomsgaard, Niels Høiby, H M Friis, B Gahrn-Hansen, H J Kolmos, P Schouenborg, B. Korsager, M. Tvede, E Gutschik, A. Bremmelgaard

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

The prevalence and antibiotic sensitivity patterns of bacteria collected consecutively from medical and surgical intensive care units (ICUs) and from hematology/oncology units in nine hospitals in Denmark were determined and compared to data collected simultaneously in 12 other European countries. Bacterial isolates from 794 Danish patients were tested and compared to 8,625 isolates from European patients. The minimal inhibitory concentrations of eight different antibiotics were determined using a microdilution plate. Similar to findings in European countries, the most common source of bacterial isolates in Danish units was the respiratory tract (49%), followed by blood (18%), urinary tract (14%) and surgical wounds (10%). Staphylococcus aureus was the most prevalent respiratory organism in Danish units, whereas Enterobacteriaceae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa dominated in other countries. In blood, Escherichia coli was most prevalent in Denmark while coagulase-negative staphylococci were predominant in other countries. Urinary tract isolates were dominated by Escherichia coli in both Denmark and the other countries, but Enterococcus faecalis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were more frequently isolated in the other countries. Staphylococcus aureus was the most frequent wound isolate in Denmark, while Enterobacteriaceae other than Escherichia coli dominated in other European countries. Thus, in Denmark Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus, followed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Klebsiella spp. (from ICUs) or Enterococcus spp. and Klebsiella spp. (from hematology/oncology units), are the most prominent pathogens in these units today. Indicator organisms of antibiotic consumption (Pseudomonas aeruginosa and methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci and Staphylococcus aureus) were more frequent in other European countries than Denmark. In general the Danish isolates were more sensitive to antibiotics than the European isolates.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftEuropean journal of clinical microbiology & infectious diseases : official publication of the European Society of Clinical Microbiology
Vol/bind14
Udgave nummer4
Sider (fra-til)275-81
Antal sider7
ISSN0934-9723
StatusUdgivet - apr. 1995

Fingeraftryk

Hematology
Denmark
Pseudomonas aeruginosa
Coagulase
Urinary Tract
Intensive Care Units
Methicillin Resistance
Respiratory System
Wounds and Injuries

Citer dette

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title = "Prevalence and antibiotic sensitivity of Danish versus other European bacterial isolates from intensive care and hematology/oncology units",
abstract = "The prevalence and antibiotic sensitivity patterns of bacteria collected consecutively from medical and surgical intensive care units (ICUs) and from hematology/oncology units in nine hospitals in Denmark were determined and compared to data collected simultaneously in 12 other European countries. Bacterial isolates from 794 Danish patients were tested and compared to 8,625 isolates from European patients. The minimal inhibitory concentrations of eight different antibiotics were determined using a microdilution plate. Similar to findings in European countries, the most common source of bacterial isolates in Danish units was the respiratory tract (49{\%}), followed by blood (18{\%}), urinary tract (14{\%}) and surgical wounds (10{\%}). Staphylococcus aureus was the most prevalent respiratory organism in Danish units, whereas Enterobacteriaceae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa dominated in other countries. In blood, Escherichia coli was most prevalent in Denmark while coagulase-negative staphylococci were predominant in other countries. Urinary tract isolates were dominated by Escherichia coli in both Denmark and the other countries, but Enterococcus faecalis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were more frequently isolated in the other countries. Staphylococcus aureus was the most frequent wound isolate in Denmark, while Enterobacteriaceae other than Escherichia coli dominated in other European countries. Thus, in Denmark Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus, followed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Klebsiella spp. (from ICUs) or Enterococcus spp. and Klebsiella spp. (from hematology/oncology units), are the most prominent pathogens in these units today. Indicator organisms of antibiotic consumption (Pseudomonas aeruginosa and methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci and Staphylococcus aureus) were more frequent in other European countries than Denmark. In general the Danish isolates were more sensitive to antibiotics than the European isolates.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)",
keywords = "Anti-Bacterial Agents, Bacterial Infections, Cross Infection, Denmark, Drug Resistance, Microbial, Drug Utilization, Europe, Gram-Negative Bacteria, Gram-Positive Bacteria, Hematology, Hospital Departments, Humans, Intensive Care Units, Microbial Sensitivity Tests, Oncology Service, Hospital, Prevalence, Comparative Study, Journal Article, Multicenter Study, Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't",
author = "A Fomsgaard and Niels H{\o}iby and Friis, {H M} and B Gahrn-Hansen and Kolmos, {H J} and P Schouenborg and B. Korsager and M. Tvede and E Gutschik and A. Bremmelgaard",
year = "1995",
month = "4",
language = "English",
volume = "14",
pages = "275--81",
journal = "European Journal of Clinical Microbiology & Infectious Diseases",
issn = "0934-9723",
publisher = "Heinemann",
number = "4",

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Prevalence and antibiotic sensitivity of Danish versus other European bacterial isolates from intensive care and hematology/oncology units. / Fomsgaard, A; Høiby, Niels; Friis, H M; Gahrn-Hansen, B; Kolmos, H J; Schouenborg, P; Korsager, B.; Tvede, M.; Gutschik, E; Bremmelgaard, A.

I: European journal of clinical microbiology & infectious diseases : official publication of the European Society of Clinical Microbiology, Bind 14, Nr. 4, 04.1995, s. 275-81.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Prevalence and antibiotic sensitivity of Danish versus other European bacterial isolates from intensive care and hematology/oncology units

AU - Fomsgaard, A

AU - Høiby, Niels

AU - Friis, H M

AU - Gahrn-Hansen, B

AU - Kolmos, H J

AU - Schouenborg, P

AU - Korsager, B.

AU - Tvede, M.

AU - Gutschik, E

AU - Bremmelgaard, A.

PY - 1995/4

Y1 - 1995/4

N2 - The prevalence and antibiotic sensitivity patterns of bacteria collected consecutively from medical and surgical intensive care units (ICUs) and from hematology/oncology units in nine hospitals in Denmark were determined and compared to data collected simultaneously in 12 other European countries. Bacterial isolates from 794 Danish patients were tested and compared to 8,625 isolates from European patients. The minimal inhibitory concentrations of eight different antibiotics were determined using a microdilution plate. Similar to findings in European countries, the most common source of bacterial isolates in Danish units was the respiratory tract (49%), followed by blood (18%), urinary tract (14%) and surgical wounds (10%). Staphylococcus aureus was the most prevalent respiratory organism in Danish units, whereas Enterobacteriaceae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa dominated in other countries. In blood, Escherichia coli was most prevalent in Denmark while coagulase-negative staphylococci were predominant in other countries. Urinary tract isolates were dominated by Escherichia coli in both Denmark and the other countries, but Enterococcus faecalis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were more frequently isolated in the other countries. Staphylococcus aureus was the most frequent wound isolate in Denmark, while Enterobacteriaceae other than Escherichia coli dominated in other European countries. Thus, in Denmark Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus, followed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Klebsiella spp. (from ICUs) or Enterococcus spp. and Klebsiella spp. (from hematology/oncology units), are the most prominent pathogens in these units today. Indicator organisms of antibiotic consumption (Pseudomonas aeruginosa and methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci and Staphylococcus aureus) were more frequent in other European countries than Denmark. In general the Danish isolates were more sensitive to antibiotics than the European isolates.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

AB - The prevalence and antibiotic sensitivity patterns of bacteria collected consecutively from medical and surgical intensive care units (ICUs) and from hematology/oncology units in nine hospitals in Denmark were determined and compared to data collected simultaneously in 12 other European countries. Bacterial isolates from 794 Danish patients were tested and compared to 8,625 isolates from European patients. The minimal inhibitory concentrations of eight different antibiotics were determined using a microdilution plate. Similar to findings in European countries, the most common source of bacterial isolates in Danish units was the respiratory tract (49%), followed by blood (18%), urinary tract (14%) and surgical wounds (10%). Staphylococcus aureus was the most prevalent respiratory organism in Danish units, whereas Enterobacteriaceae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa dominated in other countries. In blood, Escherichia coli was most prevalent in Denmark while coagulase-negative staphylococci were predominant in other countries. Urinary tract isolates were dominated by Escherichia coli in both Denmark and the other countries, but Enterococcus faecalis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were more frequently isolated in the other countries. Staphylococcus aureus was the most frequent wound isolate in Denmark, while Enterobacteriaceae other than Escherichia coli dominated in other European countries. Thus, in Denmark Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus, followed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Klebsiella spp. (from ICUs) or Enterococcus spp. and Klebsiella spp. (from hematology/oncology units), are the most prominent pathogens in these units today. Indicator organisms of antibiotic consumption (Pseudomonas aeruginosa and methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci and Staphylococcus aureus) were more frequent in other European countries than Denmark. In general the Danish isolates were more sensitive to antibiotics than the European isolates.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

KW - Anti-Bacterial Agents

KW - Bacterial Infections

KW - Cross Infection

KW - Denmark

KW - Drug Resistance, Microbial

KW - Drug Utilization

KW - Europe

KW - Gram-Negative Bacteria

KW - Gram-Positive Bacteria

KW - Hematology

KW - Hospital Departments

KW - Humans

KW - Intensive Care Units

KW - Microbial Sensitivity Tests

KW - Oncology Service, Hospital

KW - Prevalence

KW - Comparative Study

KW - Journal Article

KW - Multicenter Study

KW - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

M3 - Journal article

VL - 14

SP - 275

EP - 281

JO - European Journal of Clinical Microbiology & Infectious Diseases

JF - European Journal of Clinical Microbiology & Infectious Diseases

SN - 0934-9723

IS - 4

ER -