Prematurity Reduces Functional Adaptation to Intestinal Resection in Piglets

Lise Aunsholt, Thomas Thymann, Niels Qvist, David Sigalet, Steffen Husby, Per Torp Sangild

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

Background: Necrotizing enterocolitis and congenital gastrointestinal malformations in infants often require intestinal resection, with a subsequent risk of short bowel syndrome (SBS). We hypothesized that immediate intestinal adaptation following resection of the distal intestine with placement of a jejunostomy differs between preterm and term neonates. Methods: Preterm or term piglets were born by cesarean section and fed enterally for 2 days. On day 2, piglets were subjected to 50% distal intestinal resection with placement of a jejunostomy. On the following 4-5 days, piglets received parenteral nutrition with gradually increasing doses of enteral nutrition (bovine colostrum). Intestinal tissue samples were collected at delivery and 2 and 6-7 days after birth for histological examination and assessment of digestive enzyme activities. Results: Preterm and term piglets showed similar increases in intestinal weight and digestive enzyme activities from birth to 2 days. On days 6-7 after birth, the remnant intestine showed a similar density (g/cm) and mucosal mass in term and preterm piglets, but villus height, crypt depth, enzyme activities (sucrase, maltase, dipeptidyl peptidase IV [DPPIV]), and hexose uptake capacity were significantly higher in term piglets (P < .05). Preterm piglets were more prone to develop hypoglycemia, respiratory distress syndrome, dehydration, and circulatory instability after surgery compared with term piglets. Conclusion: Studies on intestinal adaptation after resection are feasible in both preterm and term piglets, but intensive clinical support is required when rearing preterm piglets with SBS. Physiological instability and immaturity of the intestine may explain the fact that immediate adaptation after resection is reduced in preterm vs term neonates.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftJournal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition
Vol/bind39
Udgave nummer6
Sider (fra-til)668-676
ISSN0148-6071
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 2015

Fingeraftryk

Jejunostomy
Intestines
Short Bowel Syndrome
Enzymes
Dipeptidyl Peptidase 4
Necrotizing Enterocolitis
Colostrum
alpha-Glucosidases
Enteral Nutrition
Dehydration
Hypoglycemia
Newborn Infant
Weights and Measures

Citer dette

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title = "Prematurity Reduces Functional Adaptation to Intestinal Resection in Piglets",
abstract = "Background: Necrotizing enterocolitis and congenital gastrointestinal malformations in infants often require intestinal resection, with a subsequent risk of short bowel syndrome (SBS). We hypothesized that immediate intestinal adaptation following resection of the distal intestine with placement of a jejunostomy differs between preterm and term neonates. Methods: Preterm or term piglets were born by cesarean section and fed enterally for 2 days. On day 2, piglets were subjected to 50{\%} distal intestinal resection with placement of a jejunostomy. On the following 4-5 days, piglets received parenteral nutrition with gradually increasing doses of enteral nutrition (bovine colostrum). Intestinal tissue samples were collected at delivery and 2 and 6-7 days after birth for histological examination and assessment of digestive enzyme activities. Results: Preterm and term piglets showed similar increases in intestinal weight and digestive enzyme activities from birth to 2 days. On days 6-7 after birth, the remnant intestine showed a similar density (g/cm) and mucosal mass in term and preterm piglets, but villus height, crypt depth, enzyme activities (sucrase, maltase, dipeptidyl peptidase IV [DPPIV]), and hexose uptake capacity were significantly higher in term piglets (P < .05). Preterm piglets were more prone to develop hypoglycemia, respiratory distress syndrome, dehydration, and circulatory instability after surgery compared with term piglets. Conclusion: Studies on intestinal adaptation after resection are feasible in both preterm and term piglets, but intensive clinical support is required when rearing preterm piglets with SBS. Physiological instability and immaturity of the intestine may explain the fact that immediate adaptation after resection is reduced in preterm vs term neonates.",
author = "Lise Aunsholt and Thomas Thymann and Niels Qvist and David Sigalet and Steffen Husby and Sangild, {Per Torp}",
year = "2015",
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language = "English",
volume = "39",
pages = "668--676",
journal = "Journal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition",
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Prematurity Reduces Functional Adaptation to Intestinal Resection in Piglets. / Aunsholt, Lise; Thymann, Thomas; Qvist, Niels; Sigalet, David; Husby, Steffen; Sangild, Per Torp.

I: Journal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition, Bind 39, Nr. 6, 2015, s. 668-676 .

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Prematurity Reduces Functional Adaptation to Intestinal Resection in Piglets

AU - Aunsholt, Lise

AU - Thymann, Thomas

AU - Qvist, Niels

AU - Sigalet, David

AU - Husby, Steffen

AU - Sangild, Per Torp

PY - 2015

Y1 - 2015

N2 - Background: Necrotizing enterocolitis and congenital gastrointestinal malformations in infants often require intestinal resection, with a subsequent risk of short bowel syndrome (SBS). We hypothesized that immediate intestinal adaptation following resection of the distal intestine with placement of a jejunostomy differs between preterm and term neonates. Methods: Preterm or term piglets were born by cesarean section and fed enterally for 2 days. On day 2, piglets were subjected to 50% distal intestinal resection with placement of a jejunostomy. On the following 4-5 days, piglets received parenteral nutrition with gradually increasing doses of enteral nutrition (bovine colostrum). Intestinal tissue samples were collected at delivery and 2 and 6-7 days after birth for histological examination and assessment of digestive enzyme activities. Results: Preterm and term piglets showed similar increases in intestinal weight and digestive enzyme activities from birth to 2 days. On days 6-7 after birth, the remnant intestine showed a similar density (g/cm) and mucosal mass in term and preterm piglets, but villus height, crypt depth, enzyme activities (sucrase, maltase, dipeptidyl peptidase IV [DPPIV]), and hexose uptake capacity were significantly higher in term piglets (P < .05). Preterm piglets were more prone to develop hypoglycemia, respiratory distress syndrome, dehydration, and circulatory instability after surgery compared with term piglets. Conclusion: Studies on intestinal adaptation after resection are feasible in both preterm and term piglets, but intensive clinical support is required when rearing preterm piglets with SBS. Physiological instability and immaturity of the intestine may explain the fact that immediate adaptation after resection is reduced in preterm vs term neonates.

AB - Background: Necrotizing enterocolitis and congenital gastrointestinal malformations in infants often require intestinal resection, with a subsequent risk of short bowel syndrome (SBS). We hypothesized that immediate intestinal adaptation following resection of the distal intestine with placement of a jejunostomy differs between preterm and term neonates. Methods: Preterm or term piglets were born by cesarean section and fed enterally for 2 days. On day 2, piglets were subjected to 50% distal intestinal resection with placement of a jejunostomy. On the following 4-5 days, piglets received parenteral nutrition with gradually increasing doses of enteral nutrition (bovine colostrum). Intestinal tissue samples were collected at delivery and 2 and 6-7 days after birth for histological examination and assessment of digestive enzyme activities. Results: Preterm and term piglets showed similar increases in intestinal weight and digestive enzyme activities from birth to 2 days. On days 6-7 after birth, the remnant intestine showed a similar density (g/cm) and mucosal mass in term and preterm piglets, but villus height, crypt depth, enzyme activities (sucrase, maltase, dipeptidyl peptidase IV [DPPIV]), and hexose uptake capacity were significantly higher in term piglets (P < .05). Preterm piglets were more prone to develop hypoglycemia, respiratory distress syndrome, dehydration, and circulatory instability after surgery compared with term piglets. Conclusion: Studies on intestinal adaptation after resection are feasible in both preterm and term piglets, but intensive clinical support is required when rearing preterm piglets with SBS. Physiological instability and immaturity of the intestine may explain the fact that immediate adaptation after resection is reduced in preterm vs term neonates.

U2 - 10.1177/0148607114528714

DO - 10.1177/0148607114528714

M3 - Journal article

VL - 39

SP - 668

EP - 676

JO - Journal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition

JF - Journal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition

SN - 0148-6071

IS - 6

ER -