Predator-induced changes in metabolism cannot explain the growth/predation risk tradeoff

Uli Steiner, Josh Van Buskirk

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

Defence against predators is usually accompanied by declining rates of growth or development. The classical growth/predation risk tradeoff assumes reduced activity as the cause of these declines. However, in many cases these costs cannot be explained by reduced foraging effort or enhanced allocation to defensive structures under predation risk. Here, we tested for a physiological origin of defence costs by measuring oxygen consumption in tadpoles (Rana temporaria) exposed to predation risk over short and long periods of time. The short term reaction was an increase in oxygen consumption, consistent with the "fight-or-flight" response observed in many organisms. The long term reaction showed the opposite pattern: tadpoles reduced oxygen consumption after three weeks exposure to predators, which would act to reduce the growth cost of predator defence. The results point to an instantaneous and reversible stress response to predation risk. This suggests that the tradeoff between avoiding predators and growing rapidly is not caused by changes in metabolic rate, and must be sought in other behavioural or physiological processes.
OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftP L o S One
Vol/bind4
Udgave nummer7
Sider (fra-til)e6160
ISSN1932-6203
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 2009

Fingeraftryk

Metabolism
Oxygen Consumption
predation
oxygen consumption
predators
metabolism
Growth
Oxygen
tadpoles
Rana temporaria
Physiological Phenomena
Costs
Growth and Development
stress response
flight
foraging
organisms

Citer dette

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Predator-induced changes in metabolism cannot explain the growth/predation risk tradeoff. / Steiner, Uli; Van Buskirk, Josh.

I: P L o S One, Bind 4, Nr. 7, 2009, s. e6160.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Predator-induced changes in metabolism cannot explain the growth/predation risk tradeoff

AU - Steiner, Uli

AU - Van Buskirk, Josh

PY - 2009

Y1 - 2009

N2 - Defence against predators is usually accompanied by declining rates of growth or development. The classical growth/predation risk tradeoff assumes reduced activity as the cause of these declines. However, in many cases these costs cannot be explained by reduced foraging effort or enhanced allocation to defensive structures under predation risk. Here, we tested for a physiological origin of defence costs by measuring oxygen consumption in tadpoles (Rana temporaria) exposed to predation risk over short and long periods of time. The short term reaction was an increase in oxygen consumption, consistent with the "fight-or-flight" response observed in many organisms. The long term reaction showed the opposite pattern: tadpoles reduced oxygen consumption after three weeks exposure to predators, which would act to reduce the growth cost of predator defence. The results point to an instantaneous and reversible stress response to predation risk. This suggests that the tradeoff between avoiding predators and growing rapidly is not caused by changes in metabolic rate, and must be sought in other behavioural or physiological processes.

AB - Defence against predators is usually accompanied by declining rates of growth or development. The classical growth/predation risk tradeoff assumes reduced activity as the cause of these declines. However, in many cases these costs cannot be explained by reduced foraging effort or enhanced allocation to defensive structures under predation risk. Here, we tested for a physiological origin of defence costs by measuring oxygen consumption in tadpoles (Rana temporaria) exposed to predation risk over short and long periods of time. The short term reaction was an increase in oxygen consumption, consistent with the "fight-or-flight" response observed in many organisms. The long term reaction showed the opposite pattern: tadpoles reduced oxygen consumption after three weeks exposure to predators, which would act to reduce the growth cost of predator defence. The results point to an instantaneous and reversible stress response to predation risk. This suggests that the tradeoff between avoiding predators and growing rapidly is not caused by changes in metabolic rate, and must be sought in other behavioural or physiological processes.

KW - Animals

KW - Larva

KW - Oxygen Consumption

KW - Predatory Behavior

KW - Rana temporaria

U2 - 10.1371/journal.pone.0006160

DO - 10.1371/journal.pone.0006160

M3 - Journal article

VL - 4

SP - e6160

JO - P L o S One

JF - P L o S One

SN - 1932-6203

IS - 7

ER -